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Tyrolia Free Flex plus 17 - Overkill for me?

post #1 of 23
Thread Starter 
I've just bought a pair of Supershapes and need to buy the bindings. Most commonly suggested are the FF+ 14 and FF+ 17. I've found that the 17's seem to be easier to find (at least on the web) and priced well, too. This looks like a fantastic deal:

http://levelninesports.com/tyrolia-2...old-p-903.html

Anyways, I weigh only 165 lbs. I do ski with a lot of energy and agressiveness, but usually my din is set at 7 or 8 tops. The 17's range from 6-17. Is there any reason not to choose the 17's seeing as how I would be so low on the din scale?

I've also considered the FF+ 11's, but I figure an extra $50 isn't much more to pay if the 17's are that much better.
post #2 of 23
Ideally your DIN setting should be somewhere in the middle of a bindings range and unless you're a true racer or very very agressive the FF14 would suit you better. The FF11 would also be an option. There doesn't seem to be a reason why you should spend extra $ on the FF17 even if it is a good deal.
post #3 of 23
Main difference between FF17 and FF14 is the toe. The FF17 has a more retentive upward release. If you want that, go with the FF17. Otherwise, save the money.
post #4 of 23
Get the FF 17. As long as you are in the DIN range you are fine.

That is a great price on a great binding. (I picked one up from LevelNine.)
post #5 of 23
If you cannot find the FF14 cheaper than 150, go with the FF17, it's a good, solid binding and you are in the range.
post #6 of 23
I cannot believe that it is wise to get a 6-17 DIN binding for somebody who uses DIN 7-8.

I also have the i.Supershape ski and it came with the FF14 binding. Even that seemed like overkill to me (I ski at 7.5-8 DIN). On my previous SL ski I had the FF11 binding with CP13 plate and never had a problem in 4 years of skiing it.
post #7 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by TomB View Post
I cannot believe that it is wise to get a 6-17 DIN binding for somebody who uses DIN 7-8.
A binding is defined by more than just the DIN numbers printed on it...
post #8 of 23
I see no problem setting a 6-17 binding at 7 or 8.
post #9 of 23
The key here is what Voltron said about the toe. IMO the Tyrolia Race Diagonal toe is the only one worth owning in their line up. There's a big difference between the Race Diagonal and the Full Diagonal toes. The Race Diagonal uses a separate stiffer spring to control the upward (diagonal) release modes at the toe. This results in more control of those release angles. If you're an advanced to expert skier you'll want this higher end toe to protect yourself from inadvertant upward releases. Your DIN is a bit low for the binding, but that doesn't mean it won't work and protect you well.
post #10 of 23
Have to disagree with Noodler's take away. I'm 165 and ski hard, and would NEVER consider a 17. I've used 14 or 12 Tyrolias for a while now, never had any problems with inadvertent upward release.

The race diagonal toe is for just that, racing, where a rutted course at speed could generate enough force to eject you if you get back and are trying a recovery. In normal skiing for non-experts, when you get that far back, you're courting a blown ACL, and you better hope your binding lets go!
post #11 of 23
Note:

This year’s RailFlex - RFD 14 has the Race Diagonal (tyrolia’s web site). But, the FF14 does not have the Race Diagonal.
post #12 of 23
Noodler: The key here is what Voltron said about the toe.

I think the key is the high DIN. Just about every credible source says to use a binding in its mid-range for most reliable preformance.

As for the Race Diagonal toe, that must be the last thing a recreational skier wants to have in their binding. It virtually prevents upward release unless the force is huge. How on earth can recreational skiers justify this?
post #13 of 23
Thread Starter 
Wow. There's definitely some differences of opinion on this one. I appreciate all the replies.

As of now, I'm still undecided, and have a some time if anyone else wants to weigh in.
post #14 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by TomB View Post
Noodler: The key here is what Voltron said about the toe.

I think the key is the high DIN. Just about every credible source says to use a binding in its mid-range for most reliable preformance.

As for the Race Diagonal toe, that must be the last thing a recreational skier wants to have in their binding. It virtually prevents upward release unless the force is huge. How on earth can recreational skiers justify this?
He is not going to set it at 17. If the binding could not be set at 7 or 8, why would the scale start at 6?

I am a recreational skier, and am very glad my old Tyrolia binding did not release in an upward direction when I inadvertantly found myself way back, parallel to the ground from the knees back, after recovering from some unexpected air due to a bump I didn't see at speed (note to self: avoid high speeds when you can't see past ice on your goggles). Had the binding released there is a good chance I might have gone off the icy bumpy trail into the trees and been cut in half by one of them. As it was I was able to control my path until such time as I could pull myself back upright.
post #15 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by TomB View Post

As for the Race Diagonal toe, that must be the last thing a recreational skier wants to have in their binding. It virtually prevents upward release unless the force is huge. How on earth can recreational skiers justify this?
They jump off things.


There seems to be some interest in it.
http://forums.epicski.com/showthread.php?t=38696


Edit: Tyrolia put the race diagonal toe on there top freeride binding - Mojo 15. "MOJO, TYROLIA’s first line for Park & Powder." -Tyrolia web site.

I would consider park skiers "recreational". There must be some value to the race diagonal.
post #16 of 23
Wow, I seem to have struck a nerve here unexpectedly. Anyhow I should add that I have had both the Race Diagonal and Full Diagonal toe pieces completely taken apart for servicing. There is a marked increase in the quality of the internal components in the Race Diagonal toe. There's much more metal instead of plastic.

I agree that for a majority of skiers the Full Diagonal toes may be more than sufficient, but the original poster is putting these bindings on "pseudo" race skis (that's pretty much what the Supershapes are) so I'm in the camp that the Race Diagonal bindings would be a better match.
post #17 of 23
StormDay: They jump off things.

Good point, "recreational" would include all those "huckers and jibbers". Those skiers would benefit from such a feature in the binding.

Ghost: He is not going to set it at 17. If the binding could not be set at 7 or 8, why would the scale start at 6?

Maybe it works very well at 7, I don't know. I always thought that bindings should be used in their mid-range because mechanical spring action is most predictable in its mid-range. Maybe I am wrong, but I still cannot see the logic in buying such a high-end binding only to use a fraction of its intended capability.
post #18 of 23
Thread Starter 

Update

Problem solved. Dawgcatching set me up with a great deal on some '06 FF14's.
post #19 of 23
Ah, we can count on dawgcatching to come to the rescue. I hope you enjoy the Supershapes. I have the same setup in fact but I have yet to ski them.
post #20 of 23

Setting overkill?

If your din setting is within the bindings indicated range you are good to go.

One reason to get a 6-14 or a 6-17 vs a 4-12 for a 7-9 din rated skier is to get the beefier, more durable construction usually associted w/ the higher ratings.

Compare the Mojo 15 to the Mojo 11 and you see more metal parts, less plastic and better construction.

IMHO, of course
post #21 of 23
mordern ski bindings will release reliably at all din settings, engineers arn't that stupid, nor are insurance companies
post #22 of 23
I prefer binding where the setting is in the middle third of the range. Maybe they are fully reliable at the lowest possible setting, but I'd rather put more compression on softer springs.

The Head i.Supershape is a true all-mountain ski, but needs a technically adept skier. I know, Head has it on their race ski page, but I don't know of a ski that works better in everything up to a foot of fresh powder. I like mine a LOT. With the 66cm waist, it sure goes from edge to edge quickly. I think the lengths to get are 165 for lighter skiers like Walks or 170 for heavier skiers. I know one ex-national team skier who is about 165# and on the 170s, but he's an exception. I haven't heard of anyone who likes the 175s.


Ken
post #23 of 23
Hmm.... Great deals on FR17s?
Would a person be able to mount up a pair of FR17s on some Volants?
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