EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › Ski Gear Discussion › buying good ski boots....
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

buying good ski boots....

post #1 of 18
Thread Starter 
Hi,

4 years ago I decided to stop skiing: . Why?, Because the boots I have bought were not comfortable. There is a lot of pressure points, and the side of my feet turn red in 15 minutes .

I have bought those boots at a Sport Experts shop. The guy, at the time, told me the pressure points will go away after 4-5 days of skiig because the cushion will mold to my feet. But as you already know, it did not happened. The boots he sold me are Dolomite Epic 55: .

The store refuse to take back the boots, because they were used(5 days). They tried to sell me another pair, but my bank account is not Fort Knox.

After that season, I decided to quit skiing because of the pain. I cannot keep my feet in my boots more than 30 minutes.

Today, I have a new girlfriend who is a hard skiier...and his family too...

So now, I'm looking for ski boots again...oh my oh my...: I don't really know good shop around here in sherbrooke QC, because we have just moved from another city.

I would like to have some comments on what should I do first, where should I go around here, what type of boots should I look for...

here are some infos from me:

Ski: atomic Beta carve 9.17 1m70
fix: tyrolia
weight: 195 lbs
foot: us 8 wide
height: 1m68

thanks!!!!...give me your advice!!!!
post #2 of 18
go to a good boot fitting store and let the pro do the guess work for you. Theyh will make new boots fit you, that is their job

Tremblant should have some good guys or find out where local race teams go.
post #3 of 18
You have been given good advice, there is no other answer to this problem but another pair of boots.

As an aside, it sounds as if your boots may have been bought in too roomy a model or too large a size. This is very common and although it may not be the situation in your case, it is definitely the #1 problem in bootfitting.

Good Luck

SJ
post #4 of 18
Sorry I don't know a good shop in your area, but you need to find one. For most people boots that are the right size and not too big will hurt in spots UNTIL they have been adjusted by a boot fitter. The boot fitter will do things like stretching the shell and liner, maybe remove material here and there, and make all kinds of adjustments. It is my expereince that a few days of skiing are needed to fine tune the fit, and probably you should try to get a little packing in before stretching, but that doesn't mean you won't still have to fix the tight spots. I had to bring my boots back 3 or 4 times for further stretching, skiing in them each time between stretches.
post #5 of 18
Boots are the most important piece of equipment if you ask me. Poorly fit ones make skiing a total drag. Go to a good shop and spend a few hours if you need to. Keep trying on boots until you find a couple that are snug but don't put pressure points on your feet. Put one of each boot on your feet at the same time, and keep them on for a while to see which feels better side by side. This is what I did. Definitely try some different insoles as well. I can't wait to take my new boots out this season. My old ones were starting to really kill my feet.
post #6 of 18
As mntlion said: go to a bootfitter.

The bootfitter will check out your feet and tell yo which brand and model will work with your feet. Buy them, go back to the bootfitter and have them fitted.
It will cost more than you'd planned but you'll ski better than you thought possible - and you if you have any comfort problems, see the boot fitter again and he'll sort it out (usually for free).

The difference between "ski boots" and "professionally-fitted ski boots" is mind-blowing.

Also agree with mntlion - make the trip to Tremblant to get it done.

New to Sherbrooke? I know it pretty well. Spend time in North Hatley and Montreal and you'll be fine!
What broughht you to Sherbrooke - and from where?
post #7 of 18
Each situation is different.

After years of problems, I finally bought foamed boots.

Perfection! (see my review in "Gear Reviews").

But, foam isn't cheap, requires and excellent fitter, and the process hurts a bit.

If you can find a good "regular" (not foam) bootfitter, they seem to solve problems for most. "Regular" never worked for me.
post #8 of 18
Hi Titanexpress-
Lot of good info here. I took a quick look through this site's list of boot-fitting masters (click here). There is one person listed in Montreal and another place in Stowe, VT. Another option is to ask the patrollers and instructors at your local ski hill who they'd recommend. It probably won't take long to find a consensus opinion!
You might have to drive a bit to get to somplace good, but getting boots fit correctly makes everything else soooo much easier. Good luck with your search!
post #9 of 18
I would think that it would be easier to go to Plymouth, NH from Sherbrooke (rather than Stowe or Tremblant). There's a Master Bootfitter listed in the previously linked thread in Plymouth. If I recall correctly, he doesn't sell boots, but there are lots of places around there to get boots (near Loon Mtn).
post #10 of 18
Thread Starter 
thanks all for your advice...

I have found a place in Magog, near Sherbrooke, with a GREAT bootfitter!!!

The place is Ski Velo Vincent Renaud. The guy there is called Jimmy. And I tell you, this guy knows boots!!! The bootfitting is including in the price when you buy a new pair. And they gurarantee there work or your moneu back or they will give you another pair of boots totally free.

After 5 hours at the store, trying every pair of boots, measuring, heating, I have finally bought some Tecnica Diabolo Flame Ultrafit.

At first, there was some pressure points. But after some heating, grinding, OH MY! It's the first time I find ski boots that comfortable!!!

Still, Jimmy says" Ski 1 day with them, and after that, come see me if there is some problems and we will work the boots again...until you are completely satisfied at no charges"

Is this great or not!...This is the difference with a large store employing student to sell ski boots, and a small shop with professionals...

Thanks again all...!!!...now, we just need some snow!!!
post #11 of 18
Thread Starter 
I forgot to mention, my old Dolomite Epix 55 were 27.5 size...and my tecnica are 25.5......
post #12 of 18
i was looking at boots today and the guy was telling me that there are liners that you can buy and they get heated up put in the boot and the mold to your foot. He uses them and says that they are warmer, more comfortable and and make even old boots work better than almost any top of the line ski boot. They cost around 200.
post #13 of 18
Thread Starter 
yep...you are right wolf creek freak....But I had to change my boots anyway, they were too big, and too narrow...My feet were turnig from dark red too light blue after 15 minutes of skiing with my dolomite...because the side of my feet were touching the shell firmly...
post #14 of 18
same boat as me... I'm on a boot quest as we speak..

My best advisor has said to put the shell on and wiggle in fully.. then make sure there is no more than two fingers between the boot and your heel - then get the liner fitted.

Remember thats coming from me - who has only ski'd his driveway while plowing...

If its wrong please say - cuz thats what I'm bying boots based on..
post #15 of 18
Thread Starter 
What I have learned this week-end...

Don't buy boots that are too large...and find a Bootfitter...not the teen working during week-end at a Sport Experts shop!!! Yes it will cost more, but remember, you will ski for days and years...
post #16 of 18
Quote:
Originally Posted by titanexpress View Post
thanks all for your advice...

I have found a place in Magog, near Sherbrooke, with a GREAT bootfitter!!!

The place is Ski Velo Vincent Renaud. The guy there is called Jimmy. And I tell you, this guy knows boots!!! The bootfitting is including in the price when you buy a new pair. And they gurarantee there work or your moneu back or they will give you another pair of boots totally free.

After 5 hours at the store, trying every pair of boots, measuring, heating, I have finally bought some Tecnica Diabolo Flame Ultrafit.

At first, there was some pressure points. But after some heating, grinding, OH MY! It's the first time I find ski boots that comfortable!!!

Still, Jimmy says" Ski 1 day with them, and after that, come see me if there is some problems and we will work the boots again...until you are completely satisfied at no charges"

Is this great or not!...This is the difference with a large store employing student to sell ski boots, and a small shop with professionals...

Thanks again all...!!!...now, we just need some snow!!!
Really glad things worked out for you.

I have a pet peve about how many skiers have been discouraged from keeping with the sport because of ill fitting boots. It's okay for boots to feel tight in the shop. However, pressure points or "hot spots" are unlikely to go away without correction by the boot-fitter. Anyone being fitted for boots should identify and preferably mark with a crayon, grease pencil or such any hot spots and explain the intensity of the feeling so that the boot-fitter will know where to begin to deal with the problem. Thiis season's first edition of Ski Press has a 17 point guide on getting new boots which is worth reading.
post #17 of 18
Just want to post in this cool thread about Sherbrooke...

...spent many a night in Sherbrooke ruining my next day at Jay...damn you Wellington Street...Magog too...damn you whatever that bar was in magog that sold the buckets of molsen....damn you :
post #18 of 18
Thread Starter 
hahaha.....Hope to see you this year...for ski this time.... ;-)
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Ski Gear Discussion
EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › Ski Gear Discussion › buying good ski boots....