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turn down DIN to store

post #1 of 24
Thread Starter 
As I understand it you are supposed to turn down the DIN on bindings before storing them away.
I just received some new skis and won't be skiing on them for another 3 months or so.
Would you recommend turning down the toe and heel for those 3 months?
post #2 of 24
I wouldn't bother for only 3 months.
post #3 of 24
I never turn down the DIN of my skis for the summer even. I get binding release checks done in the Fall, but I've never had one fail yet.
post #4 of 24
Yes I would. Whether or not it does help, it only takes a minute.
post #5 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by tief schnee View Post
Yes I would. Whether or not it does help, it only takes a minute.
I used to turn them down a couple of years ago, until I forgot to turn them back up on my SGs before using them in a speed event. I hit a rut near the finish line, and went sliding through the traps at 68mph. Now I leave them alone and ready to ski all summer.
post #6 of 24
I never turn them down.
post #7 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by sjjohnston View Post
I never turn them down.
Ditto.
post #8 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by GordonFreeman View Post
As I understand it you are supposed to turn down the DIN on bindings before storing them away.
I just received some new skis and won't be skiing on them for another 3 months or so.
Would you recommend turning down the toe and heel for those 3 months?
I've heard that's just a myth. I never touch em.
post #9 of 24
It all depends on how long you plan on owning those skis. If just a few years, don't worry about it. If a longer time, it is smart to release the compression on the springs during the months out of service. The springs will eventually fatigue, but it won't be for a few years.


Ken
post #10 of 24
Like my friend's dad told us when we were caught throwing the cat down the stairs and my friend said; "what? it doesn't hurt it, it always lands on its feet." the dad said; "well... it doesn't help it either."

So yeah, I open my springs up all the way in the summer. It's pretty obvious when I click in that their low, can't imagine not noticing/forgetting.
No.. I don't throw cats anymore.
post #11 of 24
I have a lot of skis... I get to it on some and not on others... it's a lot to do by hand, and admittedly quite tiring to turn skis down from a 12 to 14 DIN. I have never had a problem, but I uspect that over time they fatigue.
Later
GREG
post #12 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by SoftSnowGuy View Post
The springs will eventually fatigue, but it won't be for a few years.
With bindings springs under static load stored in a stable environment where corrosion isn't an issue, I would actually expect more like decades until spring fatigue becomes an issue...
post #13 of 24

is there a correct answer on this one?

what do the manufacturers say? or do they just want to sell you another one? how about physics man? does anyone lube the toe pivot? how can corrosion NT be an issue? can you buy new springs? would you ever buy used bindings?
post #14 of 24
I've never thrown a cat down stairs either.

Perhaps I'm missing out.
post #15 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by Voltron View Post
With bindings springs under static load stored in a stable environment where corrosion isn't an issue, I would actually expect more like decades until spring fatigue becomes an issue...
I believe that you are correct. It could even be longer than decades. At all events, anyone interested in the subject can use the search feature to find other informed replies. I need to head out or I'd do one now.






Well, I did a quick search. This is the reply from an earlier thread on the subject from Physics Man one of Epic Ski's resident experts when it comes to the physics of skiing and ski equipment.



Originally Posted by Physics Man
Er, DP, I hate to break the news to you, but you just fell for a troll. Sorry, guy.

Tom / PM

PS - BTW, of course you are right about the way springs work.

PPS - It seems like we have this same discussion about bindings at the beginning of every summer. BTW (& FWIW), the most reasonable physical mechanism that might cause problems if bindings are left under tension is slow deformation of some critical plastic part. This actually did happen to me once, but it was on an ancient pair of plate bindings (Moogs) that I had inadvertently left stored for many years with the plates on (ie, under tension). Two plastic parts on each binding each indented by at least a couple of mm, and certainly would have caused problems with the binding releasing properly. Fortunately, the reason I was looking at these skis (and hence discovered this problem) was that I was throwing them out. I would presume that with more modern plastics, a 6 month storage period, not 6 years, etc. there really is little to worry about.

post #16 of 24
BTW, the "search" feature really does work and is worth using.
I simply hit "advanced search" and typed the key words "spring fatigue". Among the threads that came up was "bindings in summer" dated June 20th, 2003. See Physics Man's post at #9.
post #17 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by duke walker View Post
can you buy new springs?

Don't know if you can really buy new springs, but I do know they can be replaced. I have heard of one particular racer replacing the springs with valve springs out of an engine (suppsedly) so that the binding appeared stock but the estimated DIN range was about 50.
post #18 of 24
Ski shop managers suggest you turn down your bindings for the summer. This way your bindings will last for 500 years, plus they can charge you $20 to turn them back up and test them in the fall.

And don't be mean to cats or I'll find out where you live and beat you up.:
post #19 of 24
There is little point in prolonging the life of your springs. The bindings will be off the indemnified list long before the springs wear out.
post #20 of 24
I think spring fatigue is more apt to happen on a sunny April day when the snow is getting soft. Beer o'clock comes sooner!
post #21 of 24
Meeeoooooowww!!!
post #22 of 24

don't bother turning 'em down

we will all most probably be dust in the wind before any modern binding spring fatigues.
post #23 of 24
I would certainly never mess with a loaded spring...you are just asking for the kind of trouble you really don't need in your life. Just walk away.
post #24 of 24
It used to be gospel that everyone should turn down their DIN settings for storage, but I think that modern bindings have much less of an issue with this.

However, I really think that there's something to the "position" the bindings are left in over time. It was pointed out to me that you should store the bindings in their CLOSED position. This generally keeps dirt/dust out of the heel (depends on the binding) and puts the spring in its most relaxed state. An open heel actually has the binding spring compressed (on most bindings - there may be some exceptions, but I'm not sure which - possibly Marker).
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