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Boot heel/toe wear from walking -- any tips?

post #1 of 25
Thread Starter 
Bought a pair of '03/04 Technica Icon DP boots two seasons ago (previous years model at the time) and have been super happy with them. Now the ski shop noticed that the heel and toe are almost worn through (and I agree -- they look worn). Unfortunately, only the heel is replacable on this boot, and it may be hard to find the parts.

I have about ~ 100 days on these guys and don't feel like I did much walking (except cabin/car to lift and back). Is this normal wear for 50 day seasons (I've only been able to ski this much for the past 3 years). My last boots needed to be retired due to this same wear...

Any tips on how to avoid this kind of wear? Looked at cat tracks, but I don't think I'm diligent enough to use them consistently. Should I buy my next set of boots along with a few pairs of replacement heel/toe pieces?

What to do? I really don't want to go through the pain of fitting another pair of boots every two or three seasons...
post #2 of 25
old-school hard core "extreme" skiers used to grind the sole and attach a vibram sole for ease of hiking on ridge tops. Something to consider, and it is also something you can always do AFTER your sole is worn out.
post #3 of 25
post #4 of 25
cat tracks are a pain but, if you don't wear them and you walk on hard surfaces, you're going to do your lugs. I had the Atomics replaced by surefoot last winter. Just got to work out how to stop the cat tracks from breaking (I have shoelaces attached to the backs so I can pull them on easily). I make a little bag to put them in, so they don't make my pockets wet or grubby.
post #5 of 25
Put your boots on in the lodge, problem solved. Bonus, you get to drive in real shoes which is probably alot safer.
post #6 of 25
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by samurai View Post
old-school hard core "extreme" skiers used to grind the sole and attach a vibram sole for ease of hiking on ridge tops. Something to consider, and it is also something you can always do AFTER your sole is worn out.
That sounds cool. So this would go under the entire boot? How would you attach it? Glue? I wonder if there's somebody in the bay area who does this and could help me?
post #7 of 25
TGR site has some info on vibram and boots, and some DIY info...

if the boot is worn down, you can get it planed flat, and then a race store can add a replaceable lifter under the boot.

Same starting point as vibram, but less walking traction, more binding friendly
post #8 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by mntlion View Post
TGR site has some info on vibram and boots, and some DIY info...

if the boot is worn down, you can get it planed flat, and then a race store can add a replaceable lifter under the boot.

Same starting point as vibram, but less walking traction, more binding friendly
This would do it, but expect to pay a fair amount for a sole plane job. Maybe your best bet would be new boots.
post #9 of 25
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by mntlion View Post
TGR site has some info on vibram and boots, and some DIY info...
Cool, just found this DIY. Sounds like a serious amount of work.
http://www.tetongravity.com/forums/s...ad.php?t=12032
post #10 of 25
We use a parking pass. $125 for the season at Dodge. We walk maybe 20 or 30 yards tops to the snow. Sometimes just five feet. That saves a lot of wear on the boots. Dodge is our home mtn though. I have no suggestions otherwise.
post #11 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by SNPete View Post
I have no suggestions otherwise.
...
Not afraid to try something new...
Walk flat-footed for looser hips when skiing AND less boot wear?
post #12 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by comprex View Post
Walk flat-footed for looser hips when skiing AND less boot wear?
And don't slide your feet!
post #13 of 25
At 2pm we offer the ninja walking clinic, meet at the main lodge rest rooms.
post #14 of 25
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by SNPete View Post
We use a parking pass. $125 for the season at Dodge. We walk maybe 20 or 30 yards tops to the snow. Sometimes just five feet. That saves a lot of wear on the boots. Dodge is our home mtn though. I have no suggestions otherwise.
Hm we rent a condo at Kirkwood. The walk from there to the snow is literally across the street, so I don't think the parking pass would buy me anything (besides, the condo has covered parking... ).
post #15 of 25

Boot Wear

Well I guess you could buy a condo really close but it may be cheaper to buy boots every other month.

I've used CatTraks for years and yes I hate putting them on too. So I leave or put them on a home before I leave. When I get to the ski areas best located rack I take my ski lock and lock them up (don't like in my pocket) oftentimes I'll have 2 pairs of skis so just lock up with ski's. Have to be there or remember end of day to get them and put on. Really saves the boot soles, is a whole bunch better walking on ice and last but not least a whole bunch cheaper than boots or a condo $13.00
post #16 of 25
And as the instructors will point out, our locker rooms are sometimes quite a clump from the snow!
post #17 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by weirded View Post
Hm we rent a condo at Kirkwood. The walk from there to the snow is literally across the street, so I don't think the parking pass would buy me anything (besides, the condo has covered parking... ).
Condo at Kirkwood. Nice!

In my case we live just down the road from Dodge. 45 minute drive. But, I think that wearing out one's boot is a good excuse to buy NEW BOOTS! So all this advice may actually be counter productive. Think about it. Esp for those of us with spouses.
post #18 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by weirded View Post
That sounds cool. So this would go under the entire boot? How would you attach it? Glue? I wonder if there's somebody in the bay area who does this and could help me?
Just a guess, but I think something like that would pretty much kill any chance of your binding releasing smoothly. Sounds like a really bad idea.
post #19 of 25
Like I said, olds-school hardcore "extreme" skiers. Their bindings don't release as a principle. Although, factory touring boots usually have vibram soles as well, and they don't have a problem releasing.
post #20 of 25
If you grind your own boot soles and attach vibram yourself, you take a serious chance of really screwing up canting.
post #21 of 25
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by icanseeformiles(andmiles) View Post
If you grind your own boot soles and attach vibram yourself, you take a serious chance of really screwing up canting.
That's a good point. Sounds like I should finish wearing them down and just replace them. Sucks though, not for the money but mostly because I'll have to go through all the motions of fitting them again. :
post #22 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by bsather View Post
Just a guess, but I think something like that would pretty much kill any chance of your binding releasing smoothly. Sounds like a really bad idea.


tested mine on a calibration machine, tested fine...

might just be mine..
post #23 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by freeskier75 View Post
Put your boots on in the lodge, problem solved. Bonus, you get to drive in real shoes which is probably alot safer.
Whoa!
I cannot imagine anyone would drive in ski boots...no one does, right?

Sounds suicidal.
post #24 of 25
Course not. koff. wouldn't dream of it.
post #25 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by ant View Post
cat tracks are a pain but, if you don't wear them and you walk on hard surfaces, you're going to do your lugs. I make a little bag to put them in, so they don't make my pockets wet or grubby.
Most people spend between $400-$600 and upwards for their boots. Using Cat Tracks, as Ant points out, makes a lot of sense. I just throw mine in a zip lock bag and stuff them in a jacket pocket when not in use. Really, I find it pretty painless. I think Cat Tracks go for about $13 dollars. I keep my boots in the car and put them on as soon as I park. That way the boots are nice and toasty when I put them on.
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