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Nurturing your skis and boards poll

Poll Results: Nurturing your Boards Poll

 
  • 20% (15)
    A-Serious
  • 57% (43)
    B-Performance
  • 18% (14)
    C-Leisure
  • 0% (0)
    D-Other?
  • 4% (3)
    F-Yeah, whatever
75 Total Votes  
post #1 of 24
Thread Starter 
Looking for a word that encompasses maintenance, repair, waxing structuring and giving some love to your boards in a positive light, 'Nurturing', : though tongue in cheek and a bit corny, seems to be a good and descriptive option. Any other ones more positive than servicing or maintaining?

Trying to assess and categorize where people are relative to 'Nurturing their boards', which may help the discussions regarding tips and techniques, it seems that these are the main categories:

A-Serious-racers, pros (makes a living on skis or snowboards), recreational, where only the highest standards of tuning, waxing, repairs, tasks tools and supplies are considered and practiced.
B-Performance-recreational & pros, depending on priorities and other factors can range from the highest standards to allow for some 'rationalized' or acceptable 'slop', but still want very good performance and maintain gear.
C-Leisure-wants to protect their investment and do the basics only to keep it simple and fun.
D-Other-another category? Please offer alternatives if needed.
F-Yeah, whatever

Please offer other ideas and input.
Thanks
post #2 of 24
Thread Starter 
Please also add comments to the Tuning for Recreational Skier thread.
post #3 of 24
Thread Starter 

Don't be shy!

106 views and only 11 respondents?
post #4 of 24
So if I want to keep high performance but don't want to spend $$$$$ on the "best" gear and have no idea what I'm doing (yet) where do I fall? I think it's leisure..

BTW, thanks for the kit alpinord. I've managed not to a) destroy my skis yet and b) not cut myself. Definitely easy to use and a good recommendation.

Hope you had a good day at Loveland.
post #5 of 24
Thread Starter 
Hey Icer, Thanks for the feedback. I ended being forced against my will to go to A-Basin instead.

There's been a lot of excellent tips and information threads over the last few weeks you might want to spend some time perusing to pick up insights and additional background. If you have any questions feel free to let me know directly or post it in a thread.

Regarding 'Leisure' versus 'Performance' I was thinking was more of an attitude or approach to tuning level, or where you want to be. I can now see the ambiguity and potential for confusion. Your skills may be at the 'Leisure' level for now and attitude at the 'Performance' level, with time, experience and focus you can find that getting to the 'next level' will come quickly and become easier and more routine.

(Woke up to new snow this AM in the San Juans this AM!.)
post #6 of 24
I do my own edges, base repair, and wax. I leave stuff like stone grinding to the pros.
post #7 of 24
Thread Starter 
Time for a bump and a graphic:

post #8 of 24
Funny... I want the "Serious" result, but only put in the "Casual" to maybe "Performance" effort. : Especially when it comes to real base prep, I'm weak. I do pretty well with the edges, I think. But, I'm really edge biased in my thinking, so that's where I concentrate. Sharp and smooth.
post #9 of 24
Thread Starter 
As with everything, we want the ideal or perfect results with the least amount of time, effort and cost. But I'll bet your skiing life will not be in shambles if your bases (nor edges) aren't absolutely perfect all of the time. Maybe by years end or next season, you will have plugged away at it enough over time to get to more acceptable level on your own. Here's some ideas on base repair.

But if it's a choice between spending more time with my kid versus obsessing over minor base or edge imperfections going for the last 10%....that's a no-brainer.
post #10 of 24
Well, thanks to the Tools4Boards base repair kit, I smoothed over some small scratches in my Mach 3 Powers before skiing them Wednesday. I am pretty meticulous with my edges (comes from years skiing in Michigan!), and try to make sure that the bases are free of coils or other chunks that could cause an issue with free sliding on the snow.
post #11 of 24

structuring and waxing

I just found a really helpful site that blew me away, which goes into tons of detail on structuring, etc. Very much worth a visit. This guy has a REALLY broad range of knowledge (FIS tech). He's also a chemist and makes his own wax for about 1/2 the price of toko. Ever hear of DrD?? Check out his website for all tuning supplies, www.racewax.com. I found him on eBay and bought a ton of stuff for a great bargin. For tuning info see: http://www.racewax.com/servlet/the-t...uningtips/Page
Highly recommended.
post #12 of 24
lol he'll appreciate that... he posts on this site!
post #13 of 24

I file my side edges, fill defects with p-tex, and wax my skis.  I rate a "B" on your scale.  I struggle with overtunung and removing too much metal. The Sharpie marker trick helps me, but I cannot tell if my edge is sharp enough or not.  My fingernail will peel yet my skis still seem to skid too much.  I wonder if I have detuned too much. Waxing is pretty easy and gratifying but I have yet to learn an easy technique to remove old wax before applying a new coat.  I welcome any advice.

 

I find the video in the link below from the late great Doug Coombs to be helpful.  As a complete aside, does anyone think that in this video Doug Coombs looks like former latenight host Craig Kilborn? Interestingly, they both attended Montana State University.

 

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4O5GUAtShiU

post #14 of 24

I file my side edges, fill defects with p-tex, and wax my skis.  I rate a "B" on your scale.  I struggle with overtunung and removing too much metal. The Sharpie marker trick helps me, but I cannot tell if my edge is sharp enough or not.  My fingernail will peel yet my skis still seem to skid too much.  I wonder if I have detuned too much. Waxing is pretty easy and gratifying but I have yet to learn an easy technique to remove old wax before applying a new coat.  I welcome any advice.

 

I find the video in the link below from the late great Doug Coombs to be helpful.  As a complete aside, does anyone think that in this video Doug Coombs looks like former latenight host Craig Kilborn? Interestingly, they both attended Montana State University.

 

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4O5GUAtShiU

post #15 of 24

I file my side edges, fill defects with p-tex, and wax my skis.  I rate a "B" on your scale.  I struggle with overtunung and removing too much metal. The Sharpie marker trick helps me, but I cannot tell if my edge is sharp enough or not.  My fingernail will peel yet my skis still seem to skid too much.  I wonder if I have detuned too much. Waxing is pretty easy and gratifying but I have yet to learn an easy technique to remove old wax before applying a new coat.  I welcome any advice.

 

I find the video in the link below from the late great Doug Coombs to be helpful.  As a complete aside, does anyone think that in this video Doug Coombs looks like former latenight host Craig Kilborn? Interestingly, they both attended Montana State University.

 

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4O5GUAtShiU

post #16 of 24

I sharpen my side edges and wax the bases.

 

I got a little lax on the edges for a few days this year, but have re-evaluated the need to keep them sharp.  I missed touching them up for a couple of days (travelling without files/guides), and then justified being lazy 'cause I was gonna just ski bumps.  Performance noticeably decreased on ice.  Thinking back to one run, it was a safety factor; I was skiing as I usually do, but didn't have the grip and came a little too close to the woods for my comfort level.  I don't mind brushing elbows with hardwood at 50 mph if that is my intent.  I do mind brushing elbows with hardwoods at 35 mph when my originally intended line has me 10 feet away from them.  I am going to replace those dead stones.

 

I do not consider it excessive to get a good fixed-angle file guide; it should out last me.  As far as all kinds of brushes and base grinding to suit conditions as the season changes during the year - forgetaboutit.  Wax, (VERY) old clothes iron (pre steam iron), scraper, files, stones, edge guide, proper professional tune every couple of years does it for me.

 

 

post #17 of 24

I have a bunch of nice tools for personal use, and at work I have access to superlative equipment, but I'm definitely going to have to go with B here.

 

I like skiing, not mindless tuning work.  I do the minimum amount of work to get the results I want.  My skis are in better shape than the vast majority of skiers because I have good tools I know how to use efficiently and I put a modicum of time into the process.  I read here about people cycling wax through their recreational skis four or five times and roll my eyes.  I cycle wax through my skis by...skiing.  Sure I wax them frequently and toss them in the hotbox and scrape/brush them, but I haven't hand brushed my own skis in years.  I don't polish edges with super-fine and hard stones because it is a waste of time with no upside.  I usually don't do any base repair except for in the shop immediately prior to a grind, and even then I try to sub it out to interns and teenagers.

post #18 of 24

Hi Alpinord,

Good topic.  I would consider myself a B-tuner on your scale, so call me a "performance" tuner.

 

I worked in the biz for a number of years (retail/repair shop, mercenary work for ski reps).  I had access to all the goodies from Spirakut, SVST, and Holmenkol.  I acquired a lot of the good stuff.  Before I left the business, I made sure that I ordered enough tools to carry me on through the years.

 

I still enjoy working on my skis.  When I need a full tune on my skis, I have the local shop do the belt and stone work.  I'll do my own edge and wax work.

 

Dennis

post #19 of 24

How about all of the above, or at least performance to serious depending on the skis.  Speed skis get the most brushing, the most wax cycles, polished edges, maybe an hotbox when possible.  GS skis get wax and stoned after every outing, even if it's only 2 runs.  SL skis seem to take more base abuse, but still get waxed, maybe filed and stoned,  after every outing.  Carving/all mountain skis get tuned if there's still time.  Twintips, usually I can't bear to look at them, get out the 12 in file and knock off the biggest nasties, wax em up and send the kids back out.  I just don't see how skis can be in tune and get slid sideways on a metal rail...  I don't hot scrape nearly enough, but more in spring.  Tools are fairly straightforward - basic iron, usually use a 6in file, panzer for sidewalls, file guides, brushes from brass to horsehair, just added a rotobrush this year, beer. 

 

It's not really ski nurturing - I think my wife calls it my nurturing time in the shop after the kids go to bed...  Of course if I had ready access to a hotbox and interns I would spend a whole lot less time tuning the family's skis as well .

post #20 of 24

Fun topic, and fun reading different responses.

 

I'm close to ssh - want "Serious" result with "Casual" effort.  I'd classify myself at B/C.

 

Here's my theory (disclaimer: the numbers are pulled completely out of my @$$).  Let's say, you have a ski prepped by a WC tech and define it as performing at 100%, then you'll have the following categories:

  1. a rental ski, which has never seen wax or an edge tune, will perform at 90%
  2. a ski with basic/universal wax and edges without dings - 99%
  3. the obsessive-compulsive ski: edges done with 6 grits of diamond, 7 cycles of wax/scrape/brush, followed by liquid/powder overlay, all based on temperature and humidity - 99.9%

 

Most skiers would notice the difference between #1 and #2.  The skis would just perform differently.  Racers excepted, I doubt many could tell the difference between #2 and #3 - both will glide very well.  However, in a 1min 40sec race, there will be a 0.9 seconds difference. 

 

I'm at level 2.  I maintain the edges with diamonds and a fixed angle guide when I can detect that the edge has rolled or has dings, and I wax/scrape/brush.  With Alpinord's great support, I'm working on dialing in the perfect wax for my typical conditions.  I'm more concerned about the wax's durability than glide, because frankly, even when I used the wax with poor durability, never had problems with the glide.  It's probably easier to screw up the glide by making things too complicated.

 

For racing, #3 makes perfect sense, for free skiing, anything above #2 is waste of time.

 

My $0.02.

 

 

post #21 of 24
Thread Starter 

Haven't seen this thread in a while. Note to self: be careful what you write.

 

(FTR, the antonym of 'nurturing' is 'neglect'. How's that for justification of the thread title?)

 

Part of the reason for this thread and support is to make it clear that taking care of your stuff and maximizing the performance is personal and not that difficult. Many just need a little nudge, others need realize it's not a white knuckle experience, is fun and rewarding.

 

Great input here and hopefully some of the 90 plus % of skiers and boarders will find 'their level'. Keep it coming.

 

 

Best Regards,

Terry (aka Alpinord)

 

 

Ski & Snowboard Base Prep, Waxing, Tuning, Tools, Supplies & Accessories

Tips and Techniques

post #22 of 24

For me it's 'D' right now...I want to do C, and I'd love to get to B, but it's a matter of first, learning how to do it and finally purchasing that starter kit from SlideWright  , second, finding a space within my apartment where I can do it without pissing off my landlord and making a mess, and third, practicing! So yeah, I need a push...

post #23 of 24

B to B+ here.  I take meticulous care of my edges and bases, wax regularly, take tension out of bindings when skis are stored, use base protectors on my race skis, have a collection of waxes and all the tools to make a ski as good as can be.  I brush them all out by hand, progressively sharpen and polish my edges, hot box even my oldest skis....yeah I am obsessive....or passionate, I like to do things at 100% levels.

 

What I have not yet gotten into is messing around with all the different types of base structures that one can get (and probably never will since that would require many of the same type of ski, one pair with each type of structure) and I have not yet delved into the uber expensive special powders and overlays that cost as much as gold.....I'll have to get much much better around the gates to justify that.

post #24 of 24

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Alpinord View Post

 

Looking for a word that encompasses maintenance, repair, waxing structuring and giving some love to your boards in a positive light, 'Nurturing', : though tongue in cheek and a bit corny, seems to be a good and descriptive option. Any other ones more positive than servicing or maintaining?

 

I offer for your consideration the fine Old English word 'Fettle' to describe the act of performing maintenance on skis.  While originally meaning 'to remove mold marks from a casting' it now is extended to mean 'to put into working order' but it also has connotations of tinkering and fiddling with just for the fun of it.  Enough linguistics.

 

I think I'm a B.  I repair base gouges and core shots (Got good results with Alpinord's repair ribbon & welding iron which I clean up with a Pansar File). I file edges with a tools4boards razor which I prefer to a SVST fixed edge guide (file is shorter on the razor and it's easier to get good results on skis with largeish sidecut)& I use an adjustable base guide and for for the ,.... er.... bases.  Maplus Universal wax and a brass brush (More Alpinord) does it for me.  Though I am pondering building a hotbox, which should surely raise me to at least a B+, if not a complete tuning nerd.

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