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Skyver/Sidewall planer

post #1 of 27
Thread Starter 
I'm looking into a sidewall planer/skyver/whatever you like to call it.

Right now I'm considering the FK sidewall skyver ($20) and the Ski Man side wall planer ($50).

Any opinions on the two? One is much more expensive than the other, and I don't know if the performance difference matters much with a tool you use pretty rarely and that doesn't really directly affect your tune.
post #2 of 27
Another option is the T4B Razor or Xact with panzer file.

(Note 20% off for EpicSki Supporters.)
post #3 of 27
Thread Starter 
I'm not sure, I've never liked the multi-use 3-in-ones, i feel like im giving up quality. I'd rather just get an FK for 7 dollars less, unless the T4B has some sweet feature you can tell me about.
post #4 of 27
Versatility. It holds any length file or stone and can also be used as an additional and adjustable side and base edge guide. You might find you won't need to buy as many set angled guides.....etc
post #5 of 27
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Alpinord View Post
Versatility. It holds any length file or stone and can also be used as an additional and adjustable side and base edge guide. You might find you won't need to buy as many set angled guides.....etc
The versatility seems cool, but I've already got 1-3 degree side guides and .5 and 1 degree base (i'm ordering a .7 any day now), although it would be cool to be able to bring it up to 6 on a friend's pair of skis and watch him crank his turns and fall over and over...
post #6 of 27
Curious, have you tried using a panzer file as a sidewall cutter in one of your side edge guides?
post #7 of 27
Thread Starter 
nope, i've always used a buddy's planer, but i'm in the market for ski equipment and its time to get my own skyver.

I hear that using a panzer + sidewall only works if you use a 90 degree side guide, otherwise it doesn't work right.
post #8 of 27
I have the Ski Man. It's a decent tool. A few of the adjustments are a little quirky (to get the right depth and sidewall tracking), but once adjusted it does a nice job of cutting and leaving a nice smooth sidewall finish (no chatter).
post #9 of 27
FWIW we also do carry it, the Ergorazor -sidewall cutter.
post #10 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by altaskier11 View Post
I'm looking into a sidewall planer/skyver/whatever you like to call it.

Right now I'm considering the FK sidewall skyver ($20) and the Ski Man side wall planer ($50).

Any opinions on the two? One is much more expensive than the other, and I don't know if the performance difference matters much with a tool you use pretty rarely and that doesn't really directly affect your tune.
If you can get an FK Sidewall Planer for $20, grab it, that is a wholesale price.
post #11 of 27

panzer file for sidewall removal

One of the best (and least expensive) options to take down the edge off-set or side-wall is to use any bevel tool with a 6 degree side edge capability with a short length of panzer file (replacing the file usually included with the tool). The panzer segment has multiple teeth to prevent taking off too much side-wall material - especially important for newbie users as sidewall cutters can gouge the side-wall if the tool is not used properly. The panzer file works remarkably well. Also, as a side (pardon the pun) the panzer segment placed in a tool with the side-edge bevel angle set to 0 degrees works remarkably well to sharpen plexi scrapers when the scraper is placed in a vise and the tool is drawn down the scraper edge.
post #12 of 27
I use a panzer clamped in a side-edge guide and it's always worked great for me. Use it with light pressure and shave gently.
post #13 of 27
Thread Starter 
I ended up ordering the FK from RRS (http://reliableracing.com/detail.cfm...&category=2000)

It was $30, not $20, but still less than the Ski Man ($50) and I used the savings to buy a new Moonflex 2.75"

Thanks everyone who put in their two cents, its good to get different people's input. And I will try that panzer file + side guide trick on my park skis, it sounds pretty cool.
post #14 of 27
I just got done with a quick tune and base wax after hitting the sidewalls. I was thinking about this discussion and the fact the simple panzer file is truly a very capable option, It's also very useful for base repairs. I have better luck than with a surform. Highly recommended, low cost addition to any kit.

I agree, it's great getting other people's perspectives and picking up new ideas and tips.
post #15 of 27
I'm looking to start doing my own tuning (edge maintenance and waxing). At the end of last season, I bought a pair of Volkl Supersport 5-Stars, my girlfriend bought the Attiva (women's) version. I'm unsure of the best way to take the "excess" material off the sidewalls, so I can keep the stone/file from getting clogged up with sidewall material.

To be honest, I'm unsure of whether these skis are cap or sandwich construction. My best (somewhat-educated) guess is cap, but I'm not certain. If they are cap (anyone know?), would I do OK with a panzer file and a 7 degree file guide? I'm not sure whether to go with a pazer file, or a dedicated sidewall cutter. I'll also be tuning our old skis, and my snowboard, so a solution versatile enough to do that would be helpful.

Thank you!
post #16 of 27
Panzer will work fine, just take it easy until you get the hang of it. The Skis you mentioned are caps.
post #17 of 27
Thread Starter 
The FK I ordered just arrived, and its a neat little tool. It fits in your palm, and its blade has a round side as well as a square one, so you can use whichever you want. My only gripe would be the same I have with all plastic tools, they seem flimsy, but for a tool that I'll use somewhat rarely and that doesn't directly impact ski performance, its alright.
post #18 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by altaskier11 View Post
My only gripe would be the same I have with all plastic tools, they seem flimsy, but for a tool that I'll use somewhat rarely and that doesn't directly impact ski performance, its alright.
So, your skis (including the bases you ride on), boots or bindings don't have any plastic in them?

Apparently, your (getting old) broad and clearly inaccurate generalization of tools with plastic components, based on your 'broad' use of 'flimsy plastic' tools (or ones you 'heard' about) did not include the T4B lexan/polycarbonate tools. The word solid comes to mind when I use these tools, along with other tools, including professional grade tools in other disciplines.
post #19 of 27
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Alpinord View Post
So, your skis (including the bases you ride on), boots or bindings don't have any plastic in them?

Apparently, your (getting old) broad and clearly inaccurate generalization of tools with plastic components, based on your 'broad' use of 'flimsy plastic' tools (or ones you 'heard' about) did not include the T4B lexan/polycarbonate tools. The word solid comes to mind when I use these tools, along with other tools, including professional grade tools in other disciplines.
I have no quarrel with your products, it is my personal preference. SVST offers a level of precision that I feel comfortable using, and that is my choice. I know its more expensive, and I'm willing to pay for it. Its not what I "heard" about; I own two BEAST Base guides, and one's plate warped and the other's screw popped out.

Would you rather tune your skis with a Toyota or a BMW? They both get the job done, but one does it a little faster than the other. When you ski on high end raceroom equipment, you need to care for it. They're the tools of my trade, and I keep them in tip-top shape with materials I am confident with.

When I give a report on a product, I do so for the benefit of the members of this forum. I may not have logged as many hours as you, and I don't operate a store, but I race, and if that doesn't warrent absolute precision, I dont know what does.
post #20 of 27
I'm not contending your preferences or goals, just the inaccuracy and your choice of words.

It leaves the wrong impression of the real quality of the T4B among other 'similar looking' tools that certainly isn't in our interests, but is not accurate info for the members or anyone to gauge their choices. We also sell higher grade and specific tools and would be happy to provide them, but for the vast majority of tuners, the 3 in 1 tools is as much of a tool as may be needed and is bomb proof, and is handy for it's versatility even after you choose to obtain dedicated guides at higher expense.

The reason more Toyotas are sold than Beemers is their cost and the fact the Toyotas are very reliable and require less maintenance costs, and get you from point A to B just as the BMW does. The Toyota is very practical and takes care of the need, the BMW is a nice luxury, but not required to meet the need.

If you are truly interested in top drawer racing performance, then you and Reliable Racing should consider Maplus and their liquids, sprays and solid waxes to complement your fine tools at the same level. Here's what SVST said about it in the past:

"Maplus - Performance Spray-On Race Wax
Italian liquid race wax-the same formulations used by the World Cups Maplus Service Team. These are a full line of no-iron, spray on race waxes that are fast, amazingly durable & very successful overseas. Already highly touted in the Nordic/Cross Country world, these products cover the entire spectrum of temperatures & humidity levels with 4 unique categories Paraffin Spray, Low Fluoro Spray, High Fluoro Spray & Cera Fluoro Spray Overlays. Choose from the following categories for the indicated temperature ranges (in °F):
High = 27° - 41°, Medium = 16° - 28°, Low = -8° - 18°"
post #21 of 27
Thread Starter 
Granted, for most people, the extra performance does not matter. But if you're on a racetrack, the extra maintenance makes the high-end BMW worth the trouble when it beats the Toyota.

I'm not in the market for a spray-on (seeing that I just ordered 900g of wax), but I'll try Malpus out.
post #22 of 27
FWIW, I'm pretty much exactly on the same page as altaskier.

I use the same FK tool. It's not the sturdiest thing I've ever handled, but fine for my use. If I were tuning more skis (like, say, working in a shop of tuning skis for a team of people) I'd probably go for the Ski Man.
post #23 of 27
Sportna Oprema / Swix Stainless Steel Planer

Best on the market. Only downside is no square blade available. I've actually found myself using it fairly often. It's been a better investment than the mucho dinero base bevelers I have and almost never use.
post #24 of 27
Thread Starter 
I must say, I salivate over the Vola Service Skyver, but its $150
post #25 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by Voltron View Post
Sportna Oprema / Swix Stainless Steel Planer

Best on the market. Only downside is no square blade available. I've actually found myself using it fairly often. It's been a better investment than the mucho dinero base bevelers I have and almost never use.
Is it okay to use a round blade with a sandwiche construction ski like the Head iGS RD? I too am in the market for a sidewall cutter, I am considering the mid-level Swix aluminum unit.
post #26 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by altaskier11 View Post
nope, i've always used a buddy's planer, but i'm in the market for ski equipment and its time to get my own skyver.

I hear that using a panzer + sidewall only works if you use a 90 degree side guide, otherwise it doesn't work right.
On the contrary, you must start by using a side edge angle 3-4 degrees more then your final edge angle. If you want a 3 degree side edge , you start with a 6 or 7 degreee side edge beveler. this is called 'backfiling'. One additional word of caution. Use a the shortest file you can (within) reason that provides stability with your tool. Due to extreme sidecut shapes now, a long file cannot follow the curve of the skis and you get a laddering effect. I use nothing longer then 4" on my side edges and I would also recommedn a short file for base edge work. it is much more difficult to bend a short file, which would ruin your base bevel angel.

I would highly recommend Holmenkol's files. they are available at www.holmenkol.us. I use the sharpest finest file I can on my base edge and then only polish with a gumm, i no diamond stones as recommended in the article below under Base edge.

read #8 on page 3. I have posted this article many times! Hope it isn't getting old, but these questions keep coming up!

http://www.holmenkol.us/myadmin/data...our%20Skis.pdf
post #27 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by XJguy View Post
Is it okay to use a round blade with a sandwiche construction ski like the Head iGS RD? I too am in the market for a sidewall cutter, I am considering the mid-level Swix aluminum unit.
Certainly, I actually prefer it to square blade. I'm not sure where the idea comes from that you should use a square blade with vertical sidewalls and a round blade for caps; I consider it a myth. I've watched race department tech's use both blade shapes on different ski constructions.
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