EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › Ski Gear Discussion › ACHING feet as of day 3???
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

ACHING feet as of day 3???

post #1 of 19
Thread Starter 
Hiya Bears! A good friend has his own boots for the last 4 years, and had custom footbeds made 2 yrs. ago as well. He´s a good skier, and has been at it for 20+ years (He´s 35).

He's complaining about aching feet as of day 3, and wonders what it could be. Uses regular ski socks (thin), and unbuckles while on lift.

Thinks it could be the liners are wet (the pain is akin to the one on cold hands), even though he dries them the old fashioned way against a floor heater in the bedroom.

My suggestion was not to take the boots off until finished for the day, and to leave the toe buckles as loose as possible, which works for me.

Any suggestions?
post #2 of 19
If he has to unbuckle while on the lift he's obviously got problems. Has he been doing this all the time or just this year? It's a good thing to have dry boots every morning when you start out. He might try a wool/nylon blend ski sock.They wick moisture better. I also suggest leaving the boots on while in the lodge for a break. The feet will swell up some and putting them back on will only make them feel more uncomfortable.

This is a wierd one. My feet cramp some my first day back out but always get back in the groove after a few hours.
post #3 of 19
Is he buckling to tightly?

I had custom footbeds done for my boots, I walked around the store for about an hour, and found a couple spots that ached. The bootfitter, knocked out the shell in those couple spots, and they are fine now.

Sometimes those custom jobbies, really need to be worn out a few times before having them molded.
post #4 of 19
Has he put on any weight?
post #5 of 19
My acid test for isolating whether it's truly a boot fitting issue or a foot "fitness" issue is to wear the boot for a few hours at home. If he can wear them at home (doing normal stuff walking around the house) without pain, but is still experiencing pain on the slopes it's more than likely foot muscle fatigue type pain probably due to it being early in the season. I go through that every season until my feet catch up to my overall fitness. You just do things with your body when you're skiing that's hard to duplicate with any other kind of exercise.
post #6 of 19
If it were me I would take out my custom footbeds and ski with the factory footbeds and see if there is a difference in the "hurting" department.

If he is having a moisture problem tell him to take his liners out to dry every night or use a boot dryer.

He could also try going through refitting the boot, like shell fitiing the cuff to the lower leg and making sure the liner fits his foot out of the boot.

Personaly, I wouldn't ski a boot all day that I had to unbuckle every lift ride. I think something is wrong here. Later, RicB.
post #7 of 19
unless I'm breaking in a new pair of boots (which I will be shortly) I buckle them in the AM and unbuckle them after the last run. I think if you are constantly buckling and unbuckling, you hve an issue.


On a side note, I see alot of people advocating walking around with boots on in your house. I try to walk in my boots as little as possible because I feel it packs in the liner in ways skiing wouldn't. Any input on that?
post #8 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by freeskier75 View Post
On a side note, I see alot of people advocating walking around with boots on in your house. I try to walk in my boots as little as possible because I feel it packs in the liner in ways skiing wouldn't. Any input on that?
I guess I never even think about it since none of my liners pack out. Thermoflex liners barely seem to pack out for me (and I have hundreds of days on my oldest pair) and my new ZipFit liners supposedly get over 700 days without any appreciable packing out whatsoever.
post #9 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by RicB View Post
If it were me I would take out my custom footbeds and ski with the factory footbeds and see if there is a difference in the "hurting" department.
this could be because he's not used to the correction of the footbed. If that's the case, take the footbed out and put them in his regular shoes so he gets used to them again without the forces of skiing.
post #10 of 19
Freeskier, I agree with you. ski boots are not designed for walking, and walking in them has the foot moving differently in the boot. If you want to get your feet accustomed to being in boots, wear them to do the ironing (standing on something slightly unstable, like a pillow or some foam).

Agree with the others too: if you have to unbuckle your boots all the time, there's a problem. Does he always have this aching, or is this a recent thing? Feet might not like the footbeds they're on, or they are still getting used to them. Oddly, aching feet can sometimes be due to gripping on, because the feet are moving in the boots. But if he has to unbuckle, it's counter-intuitive to think this could be the case.
post #11 of 19
Thread Starter 
gripping on

What's this?

BTW, thanks for all replies. I'll be passing this on to him.
post #12 of 19
Crunching up the feet to get some purchase, as the feet are sliding in the boot. It's very common. Causes aching/cramping.
post #13 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by 2-turn View Post
this could be because he's not used to the correction of the footbed. If that's the case, take the footbed out and put them in his regular shoes so he gets used to them again without the forces of skiing.
Well if they are for "correction" and not just support then he should go back to whoever "prescribed" the "correction" and have them reevaluate his feet and boot fit. I would venture that the footbed is somehow involved in this along with the fit of the boot. The last thing I would do would be to put them in my street shoes. A poorly designed footbed (not uncommon) is way worse than nothing.

Foot exercises would be way more appropriate. Later, RicB.
post #14 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by RicB View Post
Well if they are for "correction" and not just support then he should go back to whoever "prescribed" the "correction" and have them reevaluate his feet and boot fit. I would venture that the footbed is somehow involved in this along with the fit of the boot. The last thing I would do would be to put them in my street shoes. A poorly designed footbed (not uncommon) is way worse than nothing.
Foot exercises would be way more appropriate. Later, RicB.
agreed, but I didn't quite mean what I said, I was just thinking more arch support. Custom footbeds can take a while to get used to, including if they haven't been in them all summer. If the problem is the footbed, it will be esaier to spot without the addition of the ski boot, or the skiing forces also acting on the foot. Or, if it's that he's not used to them, he can warm up to them in his street shoes.
post #15 of 19

Aching feet

Some tips. New custom footbeds can change the foot volume available in the boot for his foot, expecially the front part of the foot. So the boots may no longer fit his foot, and/or the old buckle points may have to be changed. Almost always, I never buckle down for my lst warm up run of the day. If I buckle too tight (especially over my arch) for the beginning of the day I will suffer the entire day even if after I realize what I've gone and done and then loosen. So I tighten never too tight for the lst or 2nd run, get settled into boots and then tighten accordingly.

I always dry my boots after skiing, expecially on multi day trips. I have a blower only made for ski boots (no hot air just room temp) and leave them on all night. Nothing worse than putting on wet boots when its really cold outside on the snow.

ALSO. I never wear my ski socks while driving to the ski area. Your feet will warm up, swell A little and perspire a little. So you will be putting a slightly swollen foot that is damp into a boot. In the parking lot put on fresh ski socks and then the boot. Works for me.
post #16 of 19
Very good information Pete. I do the same things basically.

When I Patrolled, I was walking around the Resort in boots as much as I was on skis. I left them buckled while I was walking or in the office for short periods of time. I did this so my feet wouldn't slop and slide around.

Another important note here. When your aren't in your boots whether they're drying or just laying around, keep them buckled. It helps keep the boot structure from losing shape and form.

My first idea here might be to take the custom footbeds back to the guy who did them and explain the problems. They might need shaved or redone completely. I've known footbeds to be made by idiots or someone new to the business who botched their work. It's worth a try. Most good bootshops guarantee their work.
post #17 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gpaul View Post
Hiya Bears! A good friend has his own boots for the last 4 years, and had custom footbeds made 2 yrs. ago as well. He´s a good skier, and has been at it for 20+ years (He´s 35).

He's complaining about aching feet as of day 3, and wonders what it could be. Uses regular ski socks (thin), and unbuckles while on lift.

Thinks it could be the liners are wet (the pain is akin to the one on cold hands), even though he dries them the old fashioned way against a floor heater in the bedroom.

My suggestion was not to take the boots off until finished for the day, and to leave the toe buckles as loose as possible, which works for me.

Any suggestions?
Gpaul, You describe the problem as to one like cold hands. It sounds to me that it could be a blood flow issue related to different things, if his core body parts are cold heart, lungs etc. his body will shunt off the blood flow to the extremities to preserve body heat in the vital organs. Has he been put on any blood thinning medicine lately? When I was 1st put on stuff like that I was much colder in the hands and especially the feet than I had been the previous year. If he has had the footbeds for 2 years already the only issue I could see that could cause a problem is more weight like Yuki had mentioned, unless he has been living with this problem for 2 years now. Also just drying the boots next to a heater without taking out liners there could still be moisture in the bottom of boot and that could be causing cold foot pain.
post #18 of 19
There's a thread called "Arch Cramping Revisited" which I started that has a lot of stuff. Here's my first post from it.

http://forums.epicski.com/showthread.php?p=471067

REASONS FOR ARCH PAIN:

1. Tension in the foot cause by trying to "grip" the snow with your toes. Solutions; wiggle toes, raise toes up.

2. Pressure on the balls of the feet from driving the tips of the skis in with the feet. Solution; get the tip pressure from higher up the boot, from your shin on the tongue of the boot.

3. Pushing the heel out and thus bending the foot. Solution; get that extra torque from your hips (or legs or knees.)

4. Weakness in those small muscles in the bottom of the feet; Solution; exercise them. Put a towel on the floor with a weight on it and pushing down on it with your toes, pull it towards you.

5. Bottom two buckles on boots too tight. Solution; loosen

6. Boot adjustment, footbeds, or new boots needed. Find a good boot fitter. The problem could very well be in your boots, and even if that's only part of it - it will help.
post #19 of 19
Thread Starter 
Wow, I'm gonna use all this advice for myself!

Thanky!
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Ski Gear Discussion
EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › Ski Gear Discussion › ACHING feet as of day 3???