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forearm guards - Page 2

post #31 of 43

Japanese Gates

My duaghter was training at Copper over thanksgiving and they shared a slalom course with a Japanese team and used their gates. The gates are different than the ones used in the USA and all of the American kids were getting hit in the sides of their legs.
post #32 of 43
Yeah, it's very possible that the hinges were too tight as they were with the Reliable Racing gates. It makes for a nasty rebound- especially when used with really light gates. My hips were black and blue until I started training with my slalom suit and training shorts (I don't bruise easily)- and even then I could feel the results of repeated impacts.

This year have a whole new batch of SPM Professional 27mm gates that should reduce the pain (except on my wallet).
post #33 of 43
That does illustrate the block. But that's a dangerous line on a double panel gate. You're really tempting fate, the decision of the area to buy panels that slip off, and the ability of the race crew to put the panels on correctly. One small slip and that panel could be yanking your arm out of its socket.

Bode can get away with that. Heck, I've seen him cross block a DH gate (eh.. he was frustrated, but, still, he did it and lived..)

I agree with the posts above. At the "mortal" level, if you're hitting the gate with your forearm, then your line and/or body position is likely to be off.
post #34 of 43
December 17, 2006 Alta Badia, ITA Bode Miller 2nd


post #35 of 43

After a year of aching elbows, I bought a SL shirt and wore it under my GS suit, sure enough I was almost ripping through the forearms by the end of the season.

I was also very stung in the back a lot last year. This year I have a suit with d30 Pads, but no forearm pads, so I bought a pair of used Slytech guards, and they are too small ?

Back to the store or maybe  Soccer shin guards. 

post #36 of 43
Can you make sure I'm understanding your post right -- you're trying to protect the suit forearms from ripping?
post #37 of 43

 

 

Does this illustrate what you are saying?

 

 

Park city
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Alaska Mike View Post



Your pole and pole guard should take the gate impact, not your arm or shoulder. The old "duck under the gate" style was from when the gates were bamboo instead of breakaways. As you clear, your pole will no longer be vertical, but rather almost horizontal, in a position to protect your arms and body from the gate impact. It should be a fluid motion, not a punch at the gate to get it out of the way. If your hands are in the right place to begin with and your arms are relaxed, it will be a natural movement.
post #38 of 43



 

Quote:
Originally Posted by sibhusky View Post

 

 

Does this illustrate what you are saying?

 

 

Park city
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Alaska Mike View Post



Your pole and pole guard should take the gate impact, not your arm or shoulder. The old "duck under the gate" style was from when the gates were bamboo instead of breakaways. As you clear, your pole will no longer be vertical, but rather almost horizontal, in a position to protect your arms and body from the gate impact. It should be a fluid motion, not a punch at the gate to get it out of the way. If your hands are in the right place to begin with and your arms are relaxed, it will be a natural movement.

 


Now that would be an interesting way to take a GS double pole panel gate!
 

I think he is referring to forearm padding, not hand guards for crossblocking...

 

post #39 of 43


 

Quote:
Originally Posted by NE1 View Post



 

Quote:
Originally Posted by sibhusky View Post

 

 

Does this illustrate what you are saying?

 

 

Park city
 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Alaska Mike View Post



Your pole and pole guard should take the gate impact, not your arm or shoulder. The old "duck under the gate" style was from when the gates were bamboo instead of breakaways. As you clear, your pole will no longer be vertical, but rather almost horizontal, in a position to protect your arms and body from the gate impact. It should be a fluid motion, not a punch at the gate to get it out of the way. If your hands are in the right place to begin with and your arms are relaxed, it will be a natural movement.

 


Now that would be an interesting way to take a GS double pole panel gate!
 

I think he is referring to forearm padding, not hand guards for crossblocking...

 


Part of this thread has been about SL, part about GS.  It's hard to separate who is talking about what for some of the posts.  I believe at this point, the discussion was SL technique. 

post #40 of 43
Well, it doesn't really help when several threads are merged, either.
post #41 of 43

I didn't know that had happened.  No wonder it's so confusing. 

post #42 of 43

I guess I just distrust my own feedback or are too numb to tell what the hell is happening  SO I  have to look at my suit to know if I'm taking it in the forearms.

And before the SL shirt I couldn't tell where I was making contact, excepting the bruises the shape of California on my back.

post #43 of 43

What they said.  Right now, for Masters GS, I haven't needed them.  I have a couple of GS suits that are pretty well padded, or I have a D30 top that I use with my DH suits, and that seems to be plenty.  However...one of my teammates was training GS with the CU varsity last week, and he pounded his wrist pretty good, so he's a believer and just got a set of Slytech forearm guards.  So I'm just going to see how it goes and take it from there.  My guess is that eventually I'll pick up a set, not because I'm likely to be making forearm contact on every gate, but all I have to do is have it happen, either on purpose or not, at 40 mph just once, and I'll wish I had some pads...

 

biggrin.gif

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