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Instruction Videos

post #1 of 26
Thread Starter 
First post, been a-lurkin' for awhile.

What recommendations does anyone have for instructional videos? I've been watching:

Breakthrough on Skis (How to get out of the intermediate rut)

by Tejada-Flores.

As an intermediate who still skids through all my turns, I find this video useful for helping me understand why carving is better, and what I'm doing that makes carving impossible.

And of course, the slow motion video of good skiers in action is inspiring . . . especially at this time of year.

Great forum everyone. Thanks for all I've learned so far.
post #2 of 26

carving

harald harb is focussed on carving. maybe someone knows how to seed torrents for viewing ski stuff.
post #3 of 26
MarcusFire, wellcome to epic. Better than watching ski videos by far is to post a video of your own skiing here and get some Motion Analysis. Allso, carving is not better than skidding. Carving is better if you want to go fast on easy or intermediat level groomers but if its steep, bumpy, narrow, crowded or back country and powder you need to be skidding.
post #4 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by tdk6 View Post
MarcusFire, wellcome to epic. Better than watching ski videos by far is to post a video of your own skiing here and get some Motion Analysis. Allso, carving is not better than skidding. Carving is better if you want to go fast on easy or intermediat level groomers but if its steep, bumpy, narrow, crowded or back country and powder you need to be skidding.
.....if you are not comfortable or skilled enough to carve in those conditions, that is (I'm generally not either, but I've seen it done).
post #5 of 26
Epic is a gold mine for what you seek, search around and enjoy...you are in the right place!!! Welcome

Lito is classic, I still view for the inspiration and the drills....he has a third video breakthrough on the new skis which I have never seen. It features a lot of skiing by Harald Harb as I understand. Harbs 2 videos are great visually too but focus on 1 footed PMTS technique. I have those too and like both a lot.

Mostly tho I like free stuff. Feel free to click on the links below for free demo team videos which will demonstrate the power and efficiency of modern technique and equipment. The italian videos include many drills remarkably similar to Lito's, updated of course for modern equipment.

Did I mention free?

Various ski schools have links to good demos too, Vail and Whistler come to mind there are certainly others. CSIA west has some really good stuff too - I've lost the link.....
post #6 of 26
There are some free online lessons here:

ONLINE LESSONS

I found these two books/DVDs to be very helpful when I got back into skiing after 20 years.

Expert Skier I

Expert Skier II
post #7 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by MilesB View Post
.....if you are not comfortable or skilled enough to carve in those conditions, that is (I'm generally not either, but I've seen it done).
There is a general misconseption that all fast skiing is carving. No big deal. And yes, Im not comfortable carving down a steep, bumpy, narrow, crowded back country trail covered with 2 feet of powder. Skills really are not an issue here. Head is. And taking in consideration that MarcusFire is an intermediet skidder that cannot carve jet I as an instructor would strongly urge him not to think he should be doing it eather. For example, those guys in the WC skiing DH are also not carving all the time. Sertainly not at the very end anyway .
post #8 of 26
Thread Starter 
Thanks for all your replies.

I'm 43, exercise regularly, and in decent enough shape. I tire too easily, especially my quads, and always have. The Breakthrough on Skis video seemed to be telling me that learning to carve will alleviate this issue.

Is it also possible to skid without tiring out the quads too quickly?

I'm also going this Friday to one of the master boot fitters (Race Stock Sports in Waterbury, VT) recommended in this thread:
http://forums.epicski.com/showthread.php?t=3986
post #9 of 26
Thread Starter 
And thanks for the links and suggestions. I'll start watching forthwith.
post #10 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by MarcusFire View Post
Thanks for all your replies.

I'm 43, exercise regularly, and in decent enough shape. I tire too easily, especially my quads, and always have. The Breakthrough on Skis video seemed to be telling me that learning to carve will alleviate this issue.

Is it also possible to skid without tiring out the quads too quickly?
Yes. If you are well balanced, you won't tire as quickly. Carving helps too, in that you'll get down faster. However, high speed dynamic carving, or carving with lots of turns for speed control is very tiring too.
post #11 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by BigE View Post
Yes. If you are well balanced, you won't tire as quickly. Carving helps too, in that you'll get down faster. However, high speed dynamic carving, or carving with lots of turns for speed control is very tiring too.
I was just gonna say the same. The harder you work the faster you get tired and after a GS run of 30 seconds Im completely wasted.... IMHO and experiance no matter how fit you are it takes a while to get your muscles used to the particular strain they are exposed to each start of the season.
post #12 of 26
Thread Starter 
Allright . . . I'll watch your videos and try to get a video of myself to post.

Why do I feel like Wile E. Coyote after he just stepped off a cliff and is hanging in mid-air?

Thanks again for all your input. This is a good place to be.
post #13 of 26
Wow, MarcusFire--5 posts and already an EpicSki Supporter! Welcome to EpicSki! I'm glad you decided to stop just lurking and start posting. And I'm glad that you find EpicSki a resource worth supporting. You'll get even more out of it when you join in the discussions and ask specific questions.

As you've done!

Regarding Lito Tejada-Flores--I am one of his biggest fans, but only with some reservations. I love Lito's videos as they portray the poetry and beauty and magic of the sport of skiing. And I like Lito as a person--he is genuine, warm, and just plain exudes his passion and love for the sport. His videos are a pleasure to watch, and his books are worth reading.

However, as far as accurate technical images of the best of contemporary skiing, there is much to discuss about Lito's videos. Be aware that he skis with a lot of upper body rotation (shoulders and arms turn first, pulling the skis around), which actually serves to twist his skis into a less clean carve than may be necessary. It is not ineffective, obviously, as he skis with a lot of control, grace, and rhythm, but it does not take as full advantage of modern ski design as some alternatives, and it is detrimental to real carved turns.

Because I'm such an admirer of Lito, I am a little reluctant to point out these issues. I do not want to turn anyone away from his works. But I think it is important to understand a few technical details that could lead you astray and create habits you may not want, if you are not aware of them. You can get a lot out of any video or book, as long as you understand the downsides as well. View anything with a little healthy skepticism, an open mind, and the realization that nothing is perfect. And always question!

Best regards,
Bob
post #14 of 26
I don't know if it qualifies as an instructional video, but I picked up a copy of the PSIA-Rocky Mountain Skiing Standards dvd last year.

I think it'd be a great pick-up for any skier, instructor or not.
post #15 of 26
The PSIA-Rocky Mountain Skiing Standards DVD is not meant to be an instructional video, but I agree with Coach that it can be a good learning tool. It shows the various maneuvers from the Rocky Mountain certification exams, Levels 1, 2, and 3. There's some great skiing on it, including everything from lowest level Wedge Turns to very high level mogul and off-piste skiing. It's getting a bit dated at this point--we hope to get approval to produce a new one this season, to be available next season. But it's still worth having.

Along those lines, I'd also recommend the brand new PSIA-RM Adaptive Skiing Standards DVD. It shows the maneuvers of the Adaptive certification exams for instructors who deal with various disabilities. The maneuvers themselves are relevant to all good alpine skiers. Because Adaptive instructors often need to control students with tethers, and need to be able to stay close to, for example, blind students, there are some great maneuvers that are not included in the standard Alpine DVD. There are both offensive (gliding/carving) maneuvers and defensive (braking/slipping) maneuvers. They cover the full spectrum. Unlike the Alpine Standards DVD, the Adaptive DVD includes narrative and written explanation and a few animations and other graphical enhancements as well.

OK, since I authored, edited, and skied in both of them, I am a bit biased. But I do think they're worth watching. If anyone wants a copy of either DVD, contact the Rocky Mountain office in Steamboat (www.psia-rm.org).

Best regards,
Bob
post #16 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob Barnes/Colorado View Post
Wow, MarcusFire--5 posts and already an EpicSki Supporter! Welcome to EpicSki! I'm glad you decided to stop just lurking and start posting. And I'm glad that you find EpicSki a resource worth supporting. You'll get even more out of it when you join in the discussions and ask specific questions.

As you've done!

Regarding Lito Tejada-Flores--I am one of his biggest fans, but only with some reservations. I love Lito's videos as they portray the poetry and beauty and magic of the sport of skiing. And I like Lito as a person--he is genuine, warm, and just plain exudes his passion and love for the sport. His videos are a pleasure to watch, and his books are worth reading.

However, as far as accurate technical images of the best of contemporary skiing, there is much to discuss about Lito's videos. Be aware that he skis with a lot of upper body rotation (shoulders and arms turn first, pulling the skis around), which actually serves to twist his skis into a less clean carve than may be necessary. It is not ineffective, obviously, as he skis with a lot of control, grace, and rhythm, but it does not take as full advantage of modern ski design as some alternatives, and it is detrimental to real carved turns.

Because I'm such an admirer of Lito, I am a little reluctant to point out these issues. I do not want to turn anyone away from his works. But I think it is important to understand a few technical details that could lead you astray and create habits you may not want, if you are not aware of them. You can get a lot out of any video or book, as long as you understand the downsides as well. View anything with a little healthy skepticism, an open mind, and the realization that nothing is perfect. And always question!

Best regards,
Bob
Bob,

Your comments make me kinda sad, tho I cannot take exception with them. Lito's first video changed my life. His presentation and the entire production of that video inspired awe. Everyone I recommended it to felt the same way. He took common drills and assembled them in a beautiful video. I had been teaching my students most of the drills as we all did. What I adapted with great success was Lito's presentation and "dialed down" lingo.

When I view it now I find the drills still relevant of course but I focus on the feet. Lito's technique has become old school, the power 8 Salomons and the equipe boots have become dated.

Any hope that Lito could reshoot that video, have you or others suggested it to him? Perhaps if he could no longer walk the talk he could employ someone like yourself or a Jerry Berg to do the demos? Or has he left it up to HH to carry on and bowed out. I notice his website is becoming less frequently updated. Time marches on, but it is troubling. I feel like I know the man and he is my friend tho of course I have never met him.

I wish someone would go new school with the same theme.....Weems are you listening??? Heck if I had the time or energy I would do it myself There is nothing like it on the market currently that I am aware of.

I continue to recommend the images for low level intermediates to break out.....just watch the feet and do the drills ok?

At least I have the Italians

Bob send me a copy of your vid and I will talk it up too!!

Visual learner out.....
post #17 of 26
I continue to recommend the images for low level intermediates to break out.....just watch the feet and do the drills ok?

The trouble is that the feet won't do what they do on the video without the shoulder action. So it's can be kind of misleading.
post #18 of 26
I hear you, hrstrat. I still have my copy of the first edition of Lito's Breakthrough On Skis book, which fascinated and inspired me early in my teaching career. He writes like a poet, and his instruction is extremely simple.

But I don't think that being "older" takes much away from the videos even today. They are still beautiful portrayals of a beautiful sport, by a talented and passionate author and skier. Sure, techniiques and equipment have evolved a bit, but really, technique is a very small part of the whole skiing experience.

And we can still learn from Lito's videos and words. As I always say, skiing is about skills, not just about the technique du jour. Techniques come and go, but skills are forever. If you look at Lito's videos as definers of technique, they are dated. But if you look as his drills and exercises as skill builders, they are as valid as ever.

I've said over and over here at EpicSki that good skiing requires the ability to balance on one foot. I'm sure it always will. Even when we may stand on both feet at times these days, we still need the skills to balance on one. And to develop that balance, and the ability to move from one foot to the other, Lito's one-footed drills are timeless.

We just have to remain vigilant to the fact that exercises are not skiing. The ability to balance on one foot and to transfer weight should not be confused with the directive to transfer weight all the time, the same way, with the same timing, in every turn. And we must remember--with these and all other drills--that every exercise has something wrong with it--otherwise it would be skiing! That's as true with any "modern" exercise as it is with Lito's drills.

Lito's upper body rotation still has a big place in the complete skier's repertoire today. We may not need it as much, or as often, as Lito demonstrates it, but almost any World Cup run will confirm that the movement is still alive and important. And, ironically, the newest of the "new school" on skis--terrain parks, with their jumps and half pipes and big air--rely strongly on upper body rotation. It is the foundation of everything from the most basic 180 degree turns in the half pipe to massive 1080 spins.

So watch and enjoy Lito's videos. Get lost in the rhythm and flow and poetry--which few of today's videos have improved on. Practice his drills to develop skills. Pay attention to the effects of the movements on your skis--they're still great movements whenever you want or need your skis to do that. Skill means as much learning when and when not to use a particular movement as it means learning to make the move in the first place. And for those total "new schoolers" who never skied on old straight skis, who never learned to do a "rotary pushoff" or rebound turn, or a "stem christie," practice these "old" movements and add them to your repertoire. You'll be a better skier for it!

Best regards,
Bob
post #19 of 26
Brilliant post Bob. A fitting bit of work for your post no 3500!!!

Let's remember what Lito said about drills in breakthrough I...

"short bursts of practice and then....let's do it!!"

Any skier who has not studied Lito Tejada Flores Breakthrough on Skis I video has missed the experience of a lifetime.....it truly is that good.

Please give Lito my regards if you see him.

and best regards to you as well!!

Thanks again.

btw, I believe the true "expert" skier can balance on either foot at any time on any terrain. I stand firm in that belief...and I continue to work on it....
post #20 of 26

found the link

Marcusfire,

Check out the CSIA Alberta videos

these are real good too....

www.snowproab.com

click on course materials

Be interested in your feedback of which you like best.....:

Anyone found any new demos in the free domain??

Post em, let's share

Even better let's list all the links we find and make it a sticky!!!
post #21 of 26
Just found this thread and wanted to comment. Bob and hrstrat, I agree about Lito, his book and video were huge early influences for me.

And Bob, I love your "question everything" comment too. That pretty much defines who I am - got it from my parents, my dad use to wear a "Question Authority" button in the 60's!

There is certainly more than one way to heaven!

Bob I love the way you explain that Lito's older methods aren't wrong, but may not use the equipment as well as they could for "contemporary" techniques.

I strayed off into a Harb Video and book a few years ago, and frankly as much as I've changed my approach away from the way he teaches, his way does work - and honestly he is a beautiful skier.

Close together feet, wider stance, one footed, two footed - it's all good!
post #22 of 26
The thing about Lito IMHO that set him apart was his ability to describe technique and provide you a visualization of what he was describing. There are no doubt more technically skilled skiers but the challenge is to articulate what is going on in a manner that can be grasped by the reader. I thought Lito was without peer in his ability to do this. I love those books and videos and reread the books at leat once a ski season. His passion and love of the sport really comes through in his writing. His instruction is never ponderous and too technical. Probably to get to the next level and above you have to get into more detail than he cared to in his instruction.
post #23 of 26
Thread Starter 
HRSTRAT57 - I clicked on your Italian link and watched FreeRide. My first thought was "Does this guy realize I'm an internediate?" But oh myyyy . . . was THAT pretty! : Now the rest of the videos are most helpful for technique (instead of inspiration). They seem to mesh nicely with the instruction on the CSIA Alberta site. Thank you much for these links.

MAX_501 - Cool Approach. I wonder if there is room for someone to develop a large database of personalized technique instruction based on the "What are you currently doing?" approach. Although I imagine that's what good ski instructors do naturally. Still, an online option would be nice.

TDK6 - As soon as I can get a video of myself, I will post. Thanks for the offer .

BigE - The CSIA videos that HRSTRAT57 pointed me to definitely emphasized balance. I would like to pursue the concept of balance vs the importance of carving vs skidding. I am still working with a pair of '97 Volkl Carver +'s for the moment. I've read the many, many posts about equipment, and will try to demo some newer skis this season. After I apply Lito's 1994 instruction to my Carvers of course.

Herr Barnes - My wife (a rote beginner) is inspired by Lito as well. She picked up a pair of shaped beginner skis, but is learning to use them with Lito's instruction as her only guide. It is inspiring, and beautiful, and poetic . . . and valuable for those reasons. Just like watching the Olympics. I'll never do that . . . but it doesn't matter. It makes me want to go out and what "I" can do. And that is enough.

Haven't gotten to the PSIA stuff yet . . . it's still early.

Thank you all again for your input. I'm pleased to drink it all in.
post #24 of 26

my experience

Marcusfire,

what follows is my recent experience (05 years) and how is might relate to you...

My last ski pro formed as an instructor was Volkl Carver Plus 191, Sal propulse equipe bindings....1998. Interestingly enuff a few of the old school guys at the time in the ski school laughed at them as being too short. They were an amazing ski, great setup which I ski'd until about 3 years ago....

Next I grabbed some 183 Volkl Platinum with Marker Mrr's...same Volkl feel only a lot quicker and able to create a lot steeper angles in my skiing....however...

If you want to create the images in www.amsao.it in your skiing you must investigate the new supershape technology as I did last year. PM me with your specs if you like and I can make suggestions. The Carver Plus was the best non racing ski in the world...in 1998. It is horribly obsolete now. If you are not going to upgrade you should stick with Lito(not a bad thing) or risk huge frustration viewing and trying to replicate the images I have provided you. View the ski's the Italian demo team is riding...clearly nothing over a 170....

I would equate doing otherwise with trying to hit a huge topspin forehand with a 50's Wilson Jack Kramer wooden raquet...

Read my Volkl Allstars first impressions thread for further inspiration....

http://forums.epicski.com/showthread...eferrerid=8500

Enjoy!!!
post #25 of 26
Thread Starter 
The discussion is moving over to skis now, so I've made my next post in HR's thread:

http://forums.epicski.com/showthread...845#post579845
post #26 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by tdk6 View Post
Allso, carving is not better than skidding. Carving is better if you want to go fast on easy or intermediat level groomers but if its steep, bumpy, narrow, crowded or back country and powder you need to be skidding.......There is a general misconseption that all fast skiing is carving. No big deal. And yes, Im not comfortable carving down a steep, bumpy, narrow, crowded back country trail covered with 2 feet of powder. Skills really are not an issue here. Head is. And taking in consideration that MarcusFire is an intermediet skidder that cannot carve jet I as an instructor would strongly urge him not to think he should be doing it eather. For example, those guys in the WC skiing DH are also not carving all the time. Sertainly not at the very end anyway .
These two posts are classic!
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