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off-the-shelf footbeds

post #1 of 27
Thread Starter 
anyone recommend off the shelf footbeds for the severe pronator? i understand that some are even heat-moldable.
post #2 of 27
Yes Don't waste the Money! You are better off spending money on a good
pair of custom footbeds.
post #3 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by duke walker View Post
anyone recommend off the shelf footbeds for the severe pronator? i understand that some are even heat-moldable.
I 've had very good results with off-the-shelf footbeds, consider these: http://ecom1.sno-ski.net/bootcare.html

However, that severe pronator statement has me concerned, what are your needs when buying shoes?

Cheers,

Michael
post #4 of 27
Superfeet insoles in green are supposed to be for pronators but they didn't work well for me. You may want to avoid anything with real high/hard arch support.

Based on what I've read, I suspect most pronators do not get good results from having a custom footbed made that simply matches the shape of the bottom of your foot.

The link below has what I'll be trying this season (already bought the footbeds but haven't yet tried them in my new ski boots). The web site also has pretty good descriptive stuff on why their footbeds work.

http://www.mortonsfoot.com/mortonsfoot.html

These essentially work like a 'lifter for the big toe pad'. It is a fairly thin full-foot pad that will sit underneath the cheap but not highly arched footbed that came with the new ski boots I just bought (Salomon Falcon).

I've tried these footbeds in several of my street shoes and like them.
post #5 of 27
There is a new 'semi off the shelf' footbed that might be of interest. The company is called Aline, they have an interesting take on the foot-rigid footwear interface. For the money it's possibly the best product available.
post #6 of 27
I'm not a severe pronator, but I really like the insoles made by yoursole (yoursole.com), especially the "Ed Viesturs" model. They are carried by REI, so if you have access to one of their stores, you can try before you buy. About $40/pair and well made. Good luck.
post #7 of 27
I am a severe over pronator and tried X-static Sole Defense off the shelf footbeds. My basic fitting problem stemmed from the pronation causing the lateral ankle bones to protrude and cause severe hot spots. In a word, the off-the shelf footbeds SUCKED. They did nothing for me. I also had Tecnica Icon Carbons with the adjustable arch support built into the shell...worthless.

After suffering for years, I bought a decent pair of plug boots and put myself in the hands of the experts at Green Mountain Orthotics Lab. They took plaster casts of my feet after adjusting my leg-foot alignment to make it correct. When they put me in the boots, they told me that it would take a while to get used to the support the footbeds provided to my arch. It felt like I was standing on a golf ball. It didn't take as long to get used to as they thought and I haven't had even a "warm" spot in the ankle areas.

As it turns out, this same over-pronation was aggravating a slight case of arthritis in my lower back and both ankles when running/walking. I have since gone to a podiatrist for orthotics for my running shoes and regular shoes. My life is pain-free for the first time in 6 years.

Pay the money. It's the best money you'll spend. It'll cost you around $200 if you don't buy the boots from the bootfitter, but it's a small price to pay.
post #8 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by Whiteroom View Post
There is a new 'semi off the shelf' footbed that might be of interest. The company is called Aline, they have an interesting take on the foot-rigid footwear interface. For the money it's possibly the best product available.
I've seen those. I'm thinking of trying a pair this year.
post #9 of 27
i just got a pair of Alines yesterday. Theyre 100000x better than superfeet. Im told that they are better than the custom footbeds aswell. They are really comfortable and shape your foot to maximize response. They take some getting used to because the arch is long, but apparently its supposed to be
post #10 of 27
Check out the footbeds from Moszkito. I use the rigid one sold for 50.00. 73 different sizes, with 4 arch heights and. 6 heels widths (if I remember right). I really like mine and I've had three different pairs of customs before. Later, RicB.

Here: www.moszkito.com
post #11 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by madmanmlh View Post
i just got a pair of Alines yesterday. Theyre 100000x better than superfeet. Im told that they are better than the custom footbeds aswell.
I'm going to try a pair; I've had good luck with off-the-shelf products and I have not had good results with custom footbeds.

Custom footbeds are the outcome of the product, client and the bootfitter; getting good results is not automatic.

Cheers,

Michael
post #12 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by Whiteroom View Post
There is a new 'semi off the shelf' footbed that might be of interest. The company is called Aline, they have an interesting take on the foot-rigid footwear interface. For the money it's possibly the best product available.
Can you buy these online or do you need to find a dealer to ensure that they are properly fit?
post #13 of 27
Peter Keelty, the leading independent gear advisor, spends countless hours on the fit of his boots but uses an off-the-shelf footbed called DownUnder. I took his advice & have been using them for 3 years with no complaints.
post #14 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by madmanmlh View Post
i just got a pair of Alines yesterday. Theyre 100000x better than superfeet. Im told that they are better than the custom footbeds aswell. They are really comfortable and shape your foot to maximize response. They take some getting used to because the arch is long, but apparently its supposed to be
Where did you pick those up? Alpine Shop or Ski Rack?
post #15 of 27
alpine shop, but both have them for $50. also both of them have the same facilities for boot fitting and the same fitting prices, so whoever you go with its a good bet
post #16 of 27
This may be a really dumb question, but I'm ignorant: where do footbeds go? Do they go on top of the bootboard or do they replace it, or does it depend on the kind of footbed you buy? Say with the Alines, where would you put those?

Also, I've seen it mentioned that rigid supporting footbeds can be uncomfortable. Would they be a disadvantage for, say, landing jumps/drops, or not? If that was a concern for me, would I be better off going with something slightly cushioned like the yoursole.com footbeds? Thanks
post #17 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by tennisets View Post
This may be a really dumb question, but I'm ignorant: where do footbeds go? Do they go on top of the bootboard or do they replace it, or does it depend on the kind of footbed you buy? Say with the Alines, where would you put those?

Also, I've seen it mentioned that rigid supporting footbeds can be uncomfortable. Would they be a disadvantage for, say, landing jumps/drops, or not? If that was a concern for me, would I be better off going with something slightly cushioned like the yoursole.com footbeds? Thanks
Footbed refers to the insole that fits inside your liner. If you get custom footbeds, you would replace the ones that come with the boots.

For skiing, people use a soft footbed. A hard footbed combined with a hard, plastic shell would result in a very immobilized foot, which is bad for skiing.

What was said above is that a footbed with a very pronounced, rigid arch should not be used for severe over-pronators (flat arches, ankles roll in). Such measures will simply result in discomfort. The way to fix this would be to see a podiatrist and get corrective orthotics for everyday wear, and then get a similar orthotic for ski boots once the arch has adjusted. Making corrections in ski boots will not work when everyday shoes allow for pronation. Usually, we try to support what is there when using custom footbeds.
post #18 of 27
I use Sidas Conformable, they work fine for me, you can even "bake" them (in the oven or with a hair dryer) to make them fit better. I know a guy who does orthopedic insoles for diabetics and he was able to even "customize" the off shelf ones a bit.
post #19 of 27
Here is another prop for A-lines. I have been selling them for about 2 months now and they are great for an OTC product. I skied on a pair in three test boots last spring and was quite impressed. I have also used SF Green, and Downunders and they were pretty good too.

SJ
post #20 of 27
Yet another vote for the A-lines. Brought them into the shop recently and they've done pretty well. The feedback has been terrific. Everyone I've put on these has really liked them.
post #21 of 27
The issue that nobody is addressing is that the original poster is an over-pronater. Buying a footbed that will conform to his (probably) flat feet will not help at all. My understanding is that it is generally flat feet or fallen arches that lead to over-pronation. If your off-the shelf footbeds conform to your foot as it "stands" you won't be doing anything to address the pronation. You have to address the lower leg alignment and address the issue that is causing the ankle to collapse to the medial side. It takes someone else to do that for you...you can't do this yourself.

If you have fairly neutral feet/lower legs and only seek better support and comfort, one of these off-the-shelf footbeds may work. If you are an over-pronater, the footbeds need to address the issue that causes the over-pronation and that requires an expert.

Spend the money, it will be the best you ever spent!
post #22 of 27
Especially if you have problem feet, proper footbeds will give you more ski improvement for the money than anything else you can spend your money on. I also highly agree on the benefits of properly-flexible footbeds.

Check North East Ski Systems for superb footbeds. Also Green Mountain Orthotic Lab.


Ken
post #23 of 27
I was wondering if coconut has had a chance to try out his mortonsfoot insoles with his ski boots yet. If so, what do you think?
post #24 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by bjohansson View Post
The issue that nobody is addressing is that the original poster is an over-pronater. Buying a footbed that will conform to his (probably) flat feet will not help at all. My understanding is that it is generally flat feet or fallen arches that lead to over-pronation. If your off-the shelf footbeds conform to your foot as it "stands" you won't be doing anything to address the pronation. You have to address the lower leg alignment and address the issue that is causing the ankle to collapse to the medial side. It takes someone else to do that for you...you can't do this yourself.

If you have fairly neutral feet/lower legs and only seek better support and comfort, one of these off-the-shelf footbeds may work. If you are an over-pronater, the footbeds need to address the issue that causes the over-pronation and that requires an expert.

Spend the money, it will be the best you ever spent!
I am also severely pronated, and I totaly agree. My surefoot insoles were the best 200 bucks I ever spent.
post #25 of 27
A-line does address pronation. They are a pre-molded bed, a bootfitter then uses a rather crazy looking brannock to take foot measurements. They then use a laser to check for alignment and pronation. The foot bed is then aligned in predetermined positions and can correct a lot of problems. It sounds easy, it is easy but the results are pretty shocking. The word is really good.
post #26 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by skierhj View Post
They then use a laser to check for alignment and pronation.
anything that uses a laser must be good...
post #27 of 27

Severe Pronator?

Quote:
Originally Posted by duke walker View Post
anyone recommend off the shelf footbeds for the severe pronator? i understand that some are even heat-moldable.
The deeper the heel cup the better off you'll be. If you cannot afford a custom orthotic, which is really what I would reccomend, then try Zaps. They have a gel arch that can be easily heated and molded to fit your arch but they have the deepest heel cup of any off the shelf footbed I've seen.
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