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What is expert? - Page 3

post #61 of 76
Quote:
Originally Posted by dookey67 View Post
I sort of stick "expert" up there with "professional".

My (inarticulately stated) point was just that, as this thread has shown, "expert" is an extremely relative term. For the stuggling beginner just being able to ski in control and without fear makes a person an expert. For you it's a pro, but for many people I'm sure that you appear to be an expert.

No one really feels like a total expert because we are all looking up to the next level at the things some others can do that we can't. It's human nature that no matter how good you are you are never as good as you want to be. At least for me, the "expert" has always been the guy just ahead of me that I'm constantly chasing but never catching.
post #62 of 76
Thinking aloud here...
Is skiing too broad a subject to have just one type of expert?

Take driving...
Michael Shumacher
S├ębastien Loeb
Remy Julienne
- Three "experts". But really they are experts in narrowly defined fields. I doubt that MS could roll a car as precisely as RJ. Equally, i doubt RJ could qualify on the front row of an F1 grid.

So, should we define an "expert skier" by the part of skiing they are expert in?
i.e. "Tomba... was an expert slalom racer"
xxx is an expert powder skier
... moguls
... DH
... GS
... instructor.
etc
post #63 of 76
I'll be administering "expert" tests this winter. $25 per test, and no limits on how many times you can take the test. If you pass you get a certificate to officially document your expert status.
post #64 of 76
There's also a club. Very exclusive, must have your "expert" certificate to join. Dues are only $50 a year.
post #65 of 76
I used to think of expert skiing as anything (terrain/snow), anytime, anywhere (anywhere in the world). In-bounds skiing should not be a challenge. Technical proficiency should also not be a problem for you. Out-of-bounds skiing should not be particularly difficult for you unless it involves large cliff hucks. This stuff is basic common knowledge and is what I grade expert skiers by. Ia lso grade expert skiers by their willingness to learn and upgrade their skills... lets face it, an expert who does not keep their skills up to par will quickly be surpassed by technology and technique changes.

I still follow the above criteria, but now I tend to look at expert skiing as "you will know it when you see it." We all know expert skiing when we see it - even if we are experts ourselves. There is always someone who can do something at a higher level of proficiency than you can - and always something you can learn by watching it. When you see this new skill performed by another high level skier, you have a new skill that you need to learn and add to your repitoire.

Later

GREG
post #66 of 76
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rick View Post
I'll be administering "expert" tests this winter. $25 per test, and no limits on how many times you can take the test. If you pass you get a certificate to officially document your expert status.
Do I have to waisteer? Or can I get an expert flatboarding cert?
post #67 of 76
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rick View Post
There's also a club. Very exclusive, must have your "expert" certificate to join. Dues are only $50 a year.
Do you give out pins?
post #68 of 76
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rick View Post
There's also a club. Very exclusive, must have your "expert" certificate to join. Dues are only $50 a year.
I will agree to this if there is a belt buckle involved

Alfonse
post #69 of 76
It's been 3 days and no one yet has said:
"Anyone Can Be An Expert Skier"

To which I'll add "in their own mind". Please don't shoot the messenger, eh?
post #70 of 76
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rick View Post
I'll be administering "expert" tests this winter. $25 per test, and no limits on how many times you can take the test. If you pass you get a certificate to officially document your expert status.
Rick: We're gonna need garish, colorful, "expert" badges, that can be sewn onto jackets, covering the entire back, or one side of the front. I'm thinking: gold, white and red.

In addition, we'll need metal-foil stickers (good ones), to affix to our helmets, signifying our exalted status, and "experts only" lift lines - right to the front!

What's the point, unless everyone knows and accords the respect deserved?

Oh, also bumper stickers! We can't forget those who don't ski, who otherwise may not exhibit the appropriate level of awe.

When can you fit me in?
post #71 of 76
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rick View Post
I'll be administering "expert" tests this winter. $25 per test, and no limits on how many times you can take the test. If you pass you get a certificate to officially document your expert status.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rick View Post
There's also a club. Very exclusive, must have your "expert" certificate to join. Dues are only $50 a year.
: does this have anything to do with skiing?
post #72 of 76
"At least for me, the "expert" has always been the guy just ahead of me that I'm constantly chasing but never catching."

True dat.

I'll take an (Almost But Not Nearly Quite Hardly) Expert badge/buckle/sticker...
post #73 of 76
One thing I'm noticing. Most people's definition of expert is someone that skis better than they do. But if you're really a great skier, can't an expert be someone that is almost as good as you? I tend to think in terms of where I will take my friends skiing. If they can handle the tough terrain, they are an expert in my book, even if they can't handle it with the same level of confidence that I might. My nephews are both very good skiers, fast and smooth. But I can still take them to places that scares the bejeesus out of them. Their confidence goes down and their technique goes with it. Doesn't make them any less better of a skier. once I build their confidence back up and their instincts take over, they're experts again.
post #74 of 76
Quote:
Originally Posted by bjohansson View Post
One thing I'm noticing. Most people's definition of expert is someone that skis better than they do. But if you're really a great skier, can't an expert be someone that is almost as good as you? I tend to think in terms of where I will take my friends skiing. If they can handle the tough terrain, they are an expert in my book, even if they can't handle it with the same level of confidence that I might. My nephews are both very good skiers, fast and smooth. But I can still take them to places that scares the bejeesus out of them. Their confidence goes down and their technique goes with it. Doesn't make them any less better of a skier. once I build their confidence back up and their instincts take over, they're experts again.
There's one criteria for expert. They can ski Devil's Fiddle in manky snow and look as good as they do on Superstar when it's groomed.
post #75 of 76
Quote:
Originally Posted by 2-turn View Post
There's one criteria for expert. They can ski Devil's Fiddle in manky snow and look as good as they do on Superstar when it's groomed.
Yikes...we must contain the manky virus Doctor; we can't let it spread to this thread:
post #76 of 76
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by DonDenver View Post
Yikes...we must contain the manky virus Doctor; we can't let it spread to this thread:
ahah i started the manky term useage FYI that means it will never end. it turns out this is a good discussion. but we also finding out it cant relaly be defined.
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