EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › Ski Training and Pro Forums › Ski Instruction & Coaching › Highway Star, please, some MA
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Highway Star, please, some MA - Page 2

post #31 of 49
Thread Starter 
thanks tdk6, i appreciate it.

as miles indicates, i'm having a blast but see the glitches and, thanks to you all (in other threads, too) some of this "MA stuff" is starting to click, slowly.

i'm at a point in my skiing where i can feel that plateau and how easy it is to stay there, especially once a certain level of proficiency is reached. so, it's time to push it, which translates right now to grabbing a lesson.

miles has been pushing (in a friendly way) to finally take the steeps lesson at mammoth. i've been putting it off. (that "out of comfort zone" thing.) being in better shape has me feeling more confident. mainly, though, i want to bust through the wall i'm against right now.

i'd like to add some ripping to my skiing, and lately the iron's been feeling hot.

no "sorry" needed to add to truthful assessments. tell it as you see it. i put this up because i know there are issues and to solicit some professional (or not) feedback, which i feel pretty lucky to get.
post #32 of 49
Ryan, good attitude. BTW, you did not mention if you showed us that video before......

T
post #33 of 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by tdk6 View Post
Your swetting and your pants in particular feel strange against your leggs since you dont have long underware
Did anyone else read this line three or four times before continuing?
post #34 of 49
Thread Starter 
Maybe this is the reason you are keeping a wide stance and placing too much weight on your inside ski causing banking and making your outside ski slip

actually, this is something i became acutely aware of last season and knew, without knowing the cause(s), that i'd have to address it.

yes, have posted this before but pre-Highway Star.

for that matter, it's the "inside ski, lead with the hip, falling away outside ski" stuff from Star's clips, and the feedback, that moved me to put this up. that and the fact that i wanted Star's analysis on someone's skiing other than his own, particularly since we have some of the same issues.

i'd like to be able to take the aggressive line that Star does but with a bit more control and technical proficiency. (i guess that's redundant.)

i feel i'm an epiphany away from having things "click," opening up more of the mountain to me.

i want to be able to ski with the big boys and girls rather than taking the less challenging way back to meeting up at chair X, and when i do ski with them to ski, not just "get down the hill."
post #35 of 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by ryan View Post
for that matter, it's the "inside ski, lead with the hip, falling away outside ski" stuff from Star's clips, and the feedback, that moved me to put this up. that and the fact that i wanted Star's analysis on someone's skiing other than his own, particularly since we have some of the same issues.
Not quite......I've been getting advice that pertains to your issues way more than mine......most of the advice posted in my thread is from people massively mis-interpeting the videos and attempting to tag me with the above common advanced level faults. I don't ski like you at all, sorry.....I do ski with fair number of people that ski like you though, and we all have a good time.
post #36 of 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by Highway Star View Post
Not quite......I've been getting advice that pertains to your issues way more than mine......most of the advice posted in my thread is from people massively mis-interpeting the videos and attempting to tag me with the above common advanced level faults. I don't ski like you at all, sorry.....I do ski with fair number of people that ski like you though, and we all have a good time.
Are you blind?
post #37 of 49
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Highway Star View Post
I don't ski like you at all, sorry.....
as i said, no apologies necessary.

true, we certainly do not ski alike. (i can only speak for myself but i suspect we're both grateful that is the case.) don't take that personally, star; i'm about learning here, not ego. skiing with miles keeps me plenty humble (and wanting to get better).

further, i have a feeling the skiers i've seen and skied with, those i'd like to emulate, probably do not ski in a style you'd appreciate or applaud. and that's cool.

i'm simply (or so i thought) alluding to some symptoms we share; specifically, an overloaded inside ski and shortage of finesse. you've made clear (haven't you?) that the feedback you sought doesn't really apply to what you're actually doing (as opposed to how it looks).

Quote:
Originally Posted by Highway Star View Post
I do ski with fair number of people that ski like you though, and we all have a good time.
i'm sure we'd have a good time, star. as badly as i may have skied, i've yet to have a bad day skiing.
post #38 of 49
Did you look at Phil's vid's? I think he's quite a good skier and like his style....and I've seen him ski in person, which helps immensely.
post #39 of 49
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Highway Star View Post
Did you look at Phil's vid's? I think he's quite a good skier and like his style....and I've seen him ski in person, which helps immensely.
i did see phil's.

i agree he's quite a good skier.

i know it would've taken me a lot longer to get through that and judging by the steepness and the bumpiness, i can promise you'd see some fugly skiing from me in there, prob'ly very fugly.

fwiw, that's about exactly the kind of terrain i'd like to really be able to move through, like phil.

my MA is horrible, basically non-existent. for instance when i see phil's vid, i pretty much think "i'd like to be able to do that," and then wait for the pros to chime in.
post #40 of 49
Ryan,

To counter that whole banked turn thing, try any number of the reach towards outside boot drills lsitting around the site. The idea is to keep that jacket zipper verticle (or try) and get into a C shape. Try and get there early in the turn, don't wait till the bottom.

I think you might find that causes your stance to narrow up a bit without a whole ton of further provoking because you won't need the inside ski support so far inside anymore. If you keep it actively tipping into the turn it will move into a nice position under your hips once you give it the freedom to do its thing. Maybe keep those feet a bit back under you in transition to help stay forward.

Hope it helps some, you're skiing already looks pretty good. Just keep refining. Ski some longer turns at higher speeds and see what shakes loose.
post #41 of 49
ryan, a few questions, first?

If you can recall, what were your objectives while skiing that run? How closely did you meet them? What did you feel while skiing it?

Had you had those boots balanced? If so, by whom? What's your experience using them?

If you could change one thing about your experience of that run, what would it be?
post #42 of 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by ryan View Post
Maybe this is the reason you are keeping a wide stance and placing too much weight on your inside ski causing banking and making your outside ski slip

actually, this is something i became acutely aware of last season and knew, without knowing the cause(s), that i'd have to address it.

yes, have posted this before but pre-Highway Star.

for that matter, it's the "inside ski, lead with the hip, falling away outside ski" stuff from Star's clips, and the feedback, that moved me to put this up. that and the fact that i wanted Star's analysis on someone's skiing other than his own, particularly since we have some of the same issues.

i'd like to be able to take the aggressive line that Star does but with a bit more control and technical proficiency. (i guess that's redundant.)

i feel i'm an epiphany away from having things "click," opening up more of the mountain to me.

i want to be able to ski with the big boys and girls rather than taking the less challenging way back to meeting up at chair X, and when i do ski with them to ski, not just "get down the hill."
What HighwayStar lacks in technique he makes up with talent. I see some sloppy stuff in his skiing but he ripps. Ryan plays it safe. I cannot see any similarities in videoclips at hand. When it comes to HWS's outside ski slipping, Im not really shure if I detect any, comes from being tired (first clip). Same goes for the banking and being in the back seat. In Ryans case it comes from being a bit careful. Nothing wrong with being careful, I am sometimes. Nothing wrong with being sloppy, I am sometimes.

The reason Ryans inside skitip gets ahead is because of the wide stance and the steepness of the slope. Problem elsewhere as explained earlier. Ryan, you need to make your skiing more dynamic by staying in the fall line longer and absorb terrain and work your way down the hill more fluently. You have the technique so now you only need to relax a bit and take this information out on the mountain and work on it.

If you want to imporve your overall skiing take some mogul lessons. In moguls you need to compress and extend, work with your leggs and keep your body in perfect balance. You also learn about rhythm and speed controll.
post #43 of 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by tdk6 View Post
I cannot see any similarities in videoclips at hand.
Much of the kerfuffle over Highway Star's skiing arose from the third video he posted later on in the thread. Did you see that one?
post #44 of 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by Highway Star View Post
Did you look at Phil's vid's? I think he's quite a good skier and like his style....and I've seen him ski in person, which helps immensely.
Quote:
Originally Posted by ryan View Post
i did see phil's.

i agree he's quite a good skier.

i know it would've taken me a lot longer to get through that and judging by the steepness and the bumpiness, i can promise you'd see some fugly skiing from me in there, prob'ly very fugly.

fwiw, that's about exactly the kind of terrain i'd like to really be able to move through, like phil.

my MA is horrible, basically non-existent. for instance when i see phil's vid, i pretty much think "i'd like to be able to do that," and then wait for the pros to chime in.
Wow, thanks guys.


I am not the best in putting this kind of critique into words, I am better in visually showing. I will give it a shot. Your right turns are much stronger than your left ones, not uncommon but...You are letting your tail wash out on the left, you aren't commiting to the turn and finishing it. Weight is a tad back, get more weight onto your tongues. You have the ability, trust yourself.
post #45 of 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by moguljunkie View Post
Much of the kerfuffle over Highway Star's skiing arose from the third video he posted later on in the thread. Did you see that one?
OK, took me a while to scroll through some interesting posts but found the third video quicker than I thaught. Still dont see any resemblance between ryan and HWS. Great skiing by HWS. Incredible ammount of posts. Must have been one heck of a discussion. Glad I did not partisipate. I picked up one interesting comment, one about the fact that HWS had no reason to be tired after skiing 20 seconds!!!! Funnily enough I used that same argument to cut him some slack. I tell you guys, skiing in conditions and terrain like that on mountains like that puts your puls up in two turns.

Ryan, I like your attitude and you desire to be part of the pack. You will achieve your goals sooner than you think.

T
post #46 of 49
Thanks Ryan for providing me an .avi copy of your video to analyze. It's much easier than trying to manipulate the flash based material on utube.

Good stuff
There is a lot to like in this video. As others have noted, the first thing that stands out is the great rhythm. The first 5 turns above the camera are within a tenth of second of perfect synchronization. The pole touches are used effectively to support the upper body during the edge change (pics 18-20) (I don't see the timing problem that TDK sees). The wrist flick of the pole touches is very good (vs having the hands get pulled behind the hips). Keeping those hands in front and relatively stable indicates some good balance skills going on. You've also got a turn or two where the skis are on their new edge above the fall line (e.g. pic 20).

Pic 18 Pic 19

Pic 20
Finally, there are some pretty good edge angles happening in pic 21.


What I see
The first thing I noticed is an up move for initiation (look at the difference in the vertical distance between the knees and the bottom of the jacket in pics 18 and 19). Both legs extend during the turn initiation. Normally this would cause a noticeable vertical rise in the head position, but you let your skis get out in front of you instead. This gets your weight back (pic 25) and forces you to lift your inside ski to get it turned (pic 27).

Pic 25 (see how much of the body is outside of the red lines?)

Pic 27 (see the left ski tip lifted up?)
At this point, you are left in a banked position with your skis relatively flat compared to later in the turn (pic 1). Getting more banked than 164 degrees requires some true talent like Tai Chi Skiing(tm). Ideally for these conditions and speed, we're looking for a number in the low 150s.

pic 1
You then control speed by twisting the feet (sequence A1 and A2).

Sequence A1 Sequence A2

This causes enough braking to collapse the stacked body position (pic 20).

Pic 23
In most of the turns I see a sequential edge change. By turning the outside ski first, a wedge appears in the belly of the turns. As this wedge skids through the turns, the outside ski may slip a little at the finish. This, combined with continued pushing of the heels is what looks like an abstem (pic 24) (what Cirque was asking about). (BTW - I used a different portion of Ryan's video as what I think is a clearer demonstration of an abstem - this is described in this post in the abstem thread)


What I want to see
I want to see more shaping of the upper part of the turn (above the fall line).

Here's how we're going to do it
Since it's preseason I've got a few indoor exercises you can do to get you started.

1) Stand parallel to a wall (shoulders at a 90 degree angle to the wall) far enough away from the wall so that your outstretched arm is about 1 foot away from the wall. Lean/fall into the wall catching yourself with your hand flat against the wall.
Now bend your knees and sit back a little bit to sink down. You should feel the pressure light on your outside foot. Now feel how easy it is to turn the outside foot versus the inside foot. This is why your edge changes are sequential.
2) From this position, now rise up This is the vertical movement that I was talking about. Instead of sinking down with a sitting motion, move your belly button over the little toe of your inside (close to the wall) foot as you sink. Notice how the hips come forward? Feel the weight move forward on the bottom of your feet? Now try turning your feet. See how both feet move together more easily than the first exercise? Now try twisting your knees back and forth? Feel your feet roll up on edge?
3) Now, from the starting raised up position away from the wall, turn your hips and shoulder toward the wall as far as you can get them while keeping your feet aligned parallel with the wall. Next, as you fall into the wall, you should feel your feet roll up on edge without the wild knee movements in exercise 2. Finally, do the move in exercise 2. If you're doing it right, you'll see how your inside leg collapses while your outside leg lengthens. This is where we want to take your skiing.

Now how do we do this on snow? Phil noticed that your right turns looked better than your left. I noticed a double fall line that encouraged you to finish your left turns more across the main fall line. As HS and TDK have noted you need to let your skis turn more than your body at the finish of the turns. If you think about letting your skis continue to turn more across the hill, while holding your shoulders faced more down the hill, you will develop a countered position from which to start your next turn.This will put you in a position similar to exercise 3. Imagine pic 20 with your right hip more forward. This will get your skis on higher edge angles above the fall line, with more pressure on the tips of the skis. This will cause the skis to turn more by themselves so you won't have to twist your feet later in the turn. The end result will be more arc above the fall line than what your skiing currently has.You should also be able to make simultaneous edge changes, keep your skis more parallel through the turn, get more angulation into your turns (i.e. stop going to the bank) and maintain a tall upper body through the whole turn.

Thank you Ryan for the opportunity to pick on your skiing. Hopefully you'll find this information at least as helpful as what was in the Highway Star MA. If you've got any additional questions or comments, you know where we live.
post #47 of 49

Here's pic 24

Oops, only 10 pics allowed per post. O darn!

Here's pic 24 - is this an abstem?
post #48 of 49
Thread Starter 

wow

thank you so much.

i truly appreciate your generosity.

i'm speechless. (the crowd roars: "finally!")



"braking into up movement" really clicks for me and addresses something i began working on (along with the "high C" stuff) toward the end of last year. this adds so much to my game plan for the first day of the season!

great stuff, the rusty.
post #49 of 49
Quote:
Originally Posted by therusty View Post
Oops, only 10 pics allowed per post. O darn!

Here's pic 24 - is this an abstem?
No... or Yes... or depend on how you look at it

When you ski all kind of stuff happens. I personally hate to see perfect spotless skiing. But its very common that people pick up on flaws and try to find all kind of reasons why it happened.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Ski Instruction & Coaching
EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › Ski Training and Pro Forums › Ski Instruction & Coaching › Highway Star, please, some MA