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Learning moguls ski in NE area

post #1 of 20
Thread Starter 
Hay all,
Newbie is here..after discover this site, have read several articles about skiing moguls. I think I will give a try this season but I was wondering where would be good place to start learnning moguls ski within 4-5 hrs drive from NYC? By the way I just move from west cost last year so I have been to Hunter several times but it was too crowed especially on the weekend.

Thanks
post #2 of 20
I would say Okemo. They have perfect seeded bumps and a great teaching program.
post #3 of 20

bumps

if you wanna learn to ski the bumps take some trips to killington more specifically bear mountain at killington. we have some of the best bump runs in the east and some eh hemm pretty good instructors ourselvs
post #4 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by rtopforever View Post
if you wanna learn to ski the bumps take some trips to killington more specifically bear mountain at killington. we have some of the best bump runs in the east and some eh hemm pretty good instructors ourselvs
How long have you taught at Killington?


In reply to the thread: Anywhere with moguls, which is pretty much everywhere. Get them in the morning before they get icy and crowded.
post #5 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by rtopforever View Post
if you wanna learn to ski the bumps take some trips to killington more specifically bear mountain at killington. we have some of the best bump runs in the east and some eh hemm pretty good instructors ourselvs
Bear is great for bumps, no doubt about it. But it is not for a first timer to go to learn them. Easy seaded bumps on a blue-blue/black trail will be a better start to get turns, movement and speed in control.
post #6 of 20

bumps

just xfered here this year but have skied here forever...yeah good call phil maybe not the best place for a complete first timer but deffinently a good place to hone allready acquired skills
post #7 of 20
Belleayre (Catskills) and Elk (PA) have some great learning bumps once the season gets going and both are only a bit over 2 hours from NYC.
post #8 of 20
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Phil Pugliese View Post
Bear is great for bumps, no doubt about it. But it is not for a first timer to go to learn them. Easy seaded bumps on a blue-blue/black trail will be a better start to get turns, movement and speed in control.
Phil
That's correct...I would prefer easy bumps on blue-black trial before I even dare get on to higher level. So Okemo, Elk or Belleayre are good candiate?

Thanks
post #9 of 20
Okemo's are the easiest bumps i have skied in my life. I would go there to learn.
post #10 of 20
Try to find somewhere that machine makes them on a flatter surface - it will make it loads easier to learn on them. There was a trend a few years back for little learner mogul fields to pop up on blue runs, but I honestly don't know if areas still do that (Seven Brothers at Loon had/has one).

Go on a day when the snow is soft and forgiving. Rock hard bumps are no fun even when you know what you are doing.
post #11 of 20
Seeded bumps? I didn't know there was such a thing. How long has this been going on? How do they seed them? (Don't imagine they plant ice cubes.)
post #12 of 20
Oh, and I agree. It is hard to find learner bumps -- at a lot of areas the choices are "completely groomed" or "way too hard." Back when I was learning I remember being very frustrated by this.
post #13 of 20
The most difficult skill to learn in bump skiing is by far controlling speed. Yes I know there is also, balance, aggresiveness, quickness. But steep bumps like bear are terrible to learn on since the pitch is enough to punish a missed turn. Okemo is a good choice to learn on for sure. Of course I learned at Stowe which is not much easier. But I was also like 12 and could handle the abuse. If you are a aggressive person without fear go to Mad River and learn from the most technical bumps around. Nothing like scraping a rock, a root, and dropping a few ice waterfalls in the middle of a bump line. After that a trail like Outer Limits is easy(relatively speaking)

Alfonse
post #14 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by mdf View Post
Seeded bumps? I didn't know there was such a thing. How long has this been going on? How do they seed them? (Don't imagine they plant ice cubes.)
They actually have a machine that makes the bumps. Kind of like making wine out of coconuts if you ask me but to each their own....
post #15 of 20
Let's see, tbm700. That is a great airplane to go find bump with. Whiteface has a close by landing strip and many fine bumps and instructors.
post #16 of 20
Alfonse - aren't there some less steep, and less obstacled bump runs off the double at Mad River? I think that Mad River or Sugarbush would be a good place to learn. In years past Sugarbush has left half of Spring Fling (trail at South/Lincoln Peak) ungroomed, and I've seem some of the freestyle team training there. It's a good spot for learning bumps - not so steep that one missed turn really punishes you. A lesson will be very valuable helping you get started. I remember one of the first bump lessons I took years ago - my skiing buds didn't recognize my form because it had improved so much in one lesson.

TBM700 - another useful drill/technique if you're comfortable with it is to make short radius turns on the edge of a trail. Quite often the sides of the trails here in NE will build up piles of snow that has been scraped off from the middle of the trails. Sometimes you will see the start of some bump lines there on the edge. I like to "play" in this, trying to limit myself to about 10 - 15 feet of the trails width right along the edge.
post #17 of 20
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by tumbler View Post
TBM700 - another useful drill/technique if you're comfortable with it is to make short radius turns on the edge of a trail. Quite often the sides of the trails here in NE will build up piles of snow that has been scraped off from the middle of the trails. Sometimes you will see the start of some bump lines there on the edge. I like to "play" in this, trying to limit myself to about 10 - 15 feet of the trails width right along the edge.
That what I was doing last season but look forward to take another step on small bumps this season. By the way, if I have moguls instructor with me will this help my learning any faster?
post #18 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by Alfonse View Post
If you are a aggressive person without fear go to Mad River and learn from the most technical bumps around. Nothing like scraping a rock, a root, and dropping a few ice waterfalls in the middle of a bump line. After that a trail like Outer Limits is easy(relatively speaking)
Alfonse
I gotta disagree with you there, Al. I find MRG bumps easier, more like well-formed bumps of old. I don't know if it's the lack of boarders, the better skiers, skiers on longer skis, or all of the above, but personally, I think MRG has tougher terrain, but better formed (hence easier) bumps.
post #19 of 20

learning bumps

yeah man wherever you end up you should deffiently search out an instructor. the right bumps teacher can disect your problems then turn them into learning expirences. i have seen both the giving end and receving end of this learning expirence. often its the simplest thing an instructor can point out that totally improves your skiing. good luck!
post #20 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by Alfonse View Post
They actually have a machine that makes the bumps. Kind of like making wine out of coconuts if you ask me but to each their own....
Alfonse, are you saying there's a specific, dedicated machine for seeding bumps? (I can't tell if you're being facetious or not!)

At Okemo, they use the plow blade on the groomer to build sort of diamond shaped mounds. They start at the top and work their way to the bottom. After a day or so of being skied, the mounds actually resemble real, albeit perfectly spaced, moguls. They're great for learning, and once you've mastered the machine made bumps, it's a fairly easy transition to the "real" bumps you'll find elsewhere.

I'd assume that's how they build World Cup and Olympic bump courses, too.
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