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Attention "Boomer" Ski Instructors

post #1 of 27
Thread Starter 
My next article for TPS will be a follow up on Rusty Crooks article in Fall TPS regarding baby boomers on the slopes. My article will be geared towards instructors who have reached a "certain age."

What changes, if any, have you made in your ski fitness routine, as you grow older. What changes in your level of fitness have you noticed. Feel free to expand on the topic.

For you stud muffins who still want to pretend that you are in your 30s, I promise not to mention your name!
post #2 of 27
Ten years ago, I had never even heard of Glucosamine!
post #3 of 27
Is the autumn TPS out yet? I haven't seen it.

Ski Fitness Routine. I really must think about getting one of those (burp).
post #4 of 27
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Martin Bell View Post
Ten years ago, I had never even heard of Glucosamine!
BWAA HAA HAA!! Can I quote you for the opening line of the article?
post #5 of 27
The earth must be moving faster than when I was younger, because my mass keeps increasing, although if the increase in mass were due to increased velocity, then I would also expect to find distances shrinking, which I do not seem to find when measuring my waist. This year my fitness regime is devoted to removing mass, and focuses on aerobic activity. A problem I find with aerobic activity is that it takes a lot of effort to expend calories because my maximum heart rate is decreasing. Further, flexibility has to be part of the effort, as tendons and ligaments seem to pull when they shouldn't. This leaves relatively less time for strength or balance exercises.
post #6 of 27
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by FOG View Post
The earth must be moving faster than when I was younger, because my mass keeps increasing, although if the increase in mass were due to increased velocity, then I would also expect to find distances shrinking, which I do not seem to find when measuring my waist. This year my fitness regime is devoted to removing mass, and focuses on aerobic activity. A problem I find with aerobic activity is that it takes a lot of effort to expend calories because my maximum heart rate is decreasing. Further, flexibility has to be part of the effort, as tendons and ligaments seem to pull when they shouldn't. This leaves relatively less time for strength or balance exercises.
Another quotable comment! May I?
post #7 of 27
Celebrex anyone?? :

More reps, less weight, more core exercises, dynadisc, bosu, swiss ball, foam rollers, more aerobic, biking and nordic track, stretching. Plus I'm a lot more careful with my knees and balance my leg workout with more hamstring exercise. I'm trying to use more balance toys in my workouts and using the medicine balls more too.

My current strength workout is a two day split:
Day one-chest, triceps, legs, abs.
Day two-back, biceps, shoulders, rotator cuff.
Do the weight workouts twice a week with 1 or 2 days rest between splits. One day light, the next heavier. Got to protect my rotator cuffs and knees from old injuries so I don't go really heavy. Working more for endurance and muscle tone rather than bulk and brute strength.

Aerobics, lots of biking in the summer, nordic track 20-30 minutes 3-5 times a week when the weather is bad. Tylenol as needed. Even with this I still haven't lost my baby fat!! : Guess I just like good food, ice cream and good booze too much.

and--

IT TAKES A LOT LONGER TO RECOVER!! :

bong
post #8 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by bong View Post
...
IT TAKES A LOT LONGER TO RECOVER!! :

...
you can say that again

Quote:
Originally Posted by bong View Post
...
IT TAKES A LOT LONGER TO RECOVER!! :

...
I never thought my apres ski would consist of 3 ibuprofen with my beer.

For me, off season routine is mostly mountain biking, usually non technical single track with lots of dips and turns.
post #9 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by FOG View Post
The earth must be moving faster than when I was younger, because my mass keeps increasing,
So you're saying that you are more of a skier than you used to be?
post #10 of 27
I have good intentions. What I need is motivation.
post #11 of 27
For quotes, there's always that old one about "furniture disease"...













You know: "My chest is moving down into my drawers!"
post #12 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lisamarie View Post
Another quotable comment! May I?
Sure. good luck.
post #13 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lisamarie View Post
What changes, if any, have you made in your ski fitness routine, as you grow older. What changes in your level of fitness have you noticed. Feel free to expand on the topic.
Since last season I found that along with being overweight, and hypertensive I am also,,,,,guess what????? Type II Diabetic.
Its that old, fat, poor diet, Diabetes.

I have lost aobut 30 lbs since last season. I ride a mountain bike 12 miles most days and 24 on Monday and Friday. I usually can only find time to ride in the mornings, and with the days gettting shorter I find I cannot ride every morning.

So I have taken to playing racquetball with my 28 year old son. An hour with him in a racquetball court is like a day on the moguls, pretty rough on an old guy like me.

I think I will be in much better shape for hiking the ridges and keeping up with my partners.

I still have 1 to 2 months and plan on losing another 20 by Christmas.

Actually I think I am in better shape now than I have been for years, all I think about is how much it hurts to hike uphill at 10,000 feet.
post #14 of 27
Glucosamine, yes.
Lots of crunches on the Swiss ball.
I used to run & run & run. Now it is very hard on my knees, at least downhill.
Mountain biking is my main aerobic activity, lots of climbing & no impact on the downhill, at least if you stay on the bike.
Water skiing has always been my main muscle builder, but that's getting hard on the back.
I still run in an emergency, but find I need to go very gently on the downhills.
Hiking with poles helps with impact.
Swimming is great when it is too hot for the above mentioned activities. Zero impact, unless you hit your head on the side of the pool.
This time of year, I start adding more tension type exercises, wall sits, leg lifts, leaping etc.
Once the weather starts getting fickle, cold and/or wet outside I need to be a little more inventive. There's aways the gym as a last resort.
If there is snow on the ground, and the resorts aren't open yet, I will start skinning and getting some early turns.
Stretch, stretch, stretch... never leave home without it!

JF
post #15 of 27
Thread Starter 
Excellent! I will have some fun writing this!
post #16 of 27
In more serious vein, one issue with exercise is time, and budgeting time. I got back from vacation much heavier than I thought I would be, so I have focused almost all of my exercise efforts on weight loss this fall. If I had been closer to a reasonable weight I might have spent more time on strength training, or interval training. Right now, job one is to burn calories, so away I go. If I have more time I spend it on an arc trainer, elliptical trainer or treadmill, and at a steady, but fairly high rate. Were I closer to ideal weight, I would balance among interval training, weight training, balance training, and use much more variety. By the same token, were I to injur something, my exercise pattern would have to focus on what was injured. Being 52 means that I have to be very choosy with my priorities.
post #17 of 27
Thread Starter 
I hear you, FOG, but you know what? You can even get a bit of balance on the ellipticals, etc. by using them without holding on to the handle bars.

Question for instructors? How has being older affected you teaching? Are you less apt to teach hard classes two days in a row? Are you more prone to spending more time talking and explaining.Are you less likely to help pick up a student who has fallen?

Discuss.
post #18 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lisamarie View Post
I hear you, FOG, but you know what? You can even get a bit of balance on the ellipticals, etc. by using them without holding on to the handle bars.

Question for instructors? How has being older affected you teaching? Are you less apt to teach hard classes two days in a row? Are you more prone to spending more time talking and explaining.Are you less likely to help pick up a student who has fallen?

Discuss.
Even when out of shape, I don't find myself having to back off very often. I actually find just the opposite issue. I try to do a lot of skating in beginner lessons, and when I get a little careless, I find that I have worn out the students, not the other way round. I will talk to let the students catch their breath. As far as picking up students, I find that leverage is the key. I place one ski pole into the snow across the front of the student's boot so he or she cannot slide forward, and just give a good pull on the arm nearest me. Of course, since I weigh 250 or so, the laws of physics sort of help.
post #19 of 27
How has being older affected you teaching?
It is definately easier, & more fun! Problem solving & MA are second nature. Years of experience count for something.

Are you less apt to teach hard classes two days in a row?
No, I spend most of my time with upper levels. I'm the go to guy when a guest wants to get worn out, or ski the bumps & crud. But I'm only 50...

Are you more prone to spending more time talking and explaining?
Just the opposite, I've learned to let the mountain do the teaching in a sense. Less talk, more rock! More like guided discovery, I guess. Of course it all depends on what the client needs, I can get analytcal for the engineer types if needed.

Are you less likely to help pick up a student who has fallen?
I use the same leverage technique as Fog. Even if my students know how to get up on their own, I don't want them wasting their energy. Just don't tell my Risk Manager.

JF
post #20 of 27
Thread Starter 
I will be finalizing this in the next few weeks, so if anyone has any additional comments, please feel free to post. Thanks!
post #21 of 27

Boomer ski conditioning

After not skiing for over 20 years, I took it up again a couple of years ago, and very seriously a year ago. I'm 57. Despite maintaining a solid 5 to 6 day a week gym routine most of the time (3 days weights, 3-4 days cardio), mountain biking in the summers, all this still isn't enough for skiing. I decided some ski-specific conditioning was in order, so after debating about a year I bought a Skier's Edge to use all year round, but more heavily just prior to sea season and all during. I really really like it, and found at the tail end of last season it was really improving my ski ability and more important, my stamina on the slopes.

For ski instructors dealing with those of us in my age category (I always take lessons here and there all season long), I'd like to see an understanding of the idea that many of us don't want to be too fast and daring because we don't want injuries at this age (slower to recover, most definitely). My goal is to greatly improve my technique and confidence, but I doubt I will ever want to do black diamonds or off piste. But I want to do well at my chosen speed in all sorts of conditions.
post #22 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by CMCM View Post

For ski instructors dealing with those of us in my age category (I always take lessons here and there all season long), I'd like to see an understanding of the idea that many of us don't want to be too fast and daring because we don't want injuries at this age (slower to recover, most definitely). My goal is to greatly improve my technique and confidence, but I doubt I will ever want to do black diamonds or off piste. But I want to do well at my chosen speed in all sorts of conditions.
Can't be repeated loudly enough or often enough. I started skiing for the first time about 10 years ago, at 42. I don't want to be fast. I don't want to jump. I don't want to impress anyone with my daring, including myself. I'm not looking for the hairiest thing to survive, I'm looking to be really good at what I like to do.

My goal from my first day has been to be good enough to get on any lift, get off, and just go where my whims take me, safely. And to be the slowest guy on that run who is actually skiing well.
post #23 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by Carp View Post
Can't be repeated loudly enough or often enough. I started skiing for the first time about 10 years ago, at 42. I don't want to be fast. I don't want to jump. I don't want to impress anyone with my daring, including myself. I'm not looking for the hairiest thing to survive, I'm looking to be really good at what I like to do.

My goal from my first day has been to be good enough to get on any lift, get off, and just go where my whims take me, safely. And to be the slowest guy on that run who is actually skiing well.
I had a private two years ago from a student that had just made the change from 210 Volkl's to shaped skis, he wanted to learn how to make high-speed carving turns. He was (per him) only 82.

[edited for addition]
Wanting what Carp ask above is not a foregone conclusion. I occassionally go to another area and take a lesson without revealing what I do for a living in the Winter. FWIW, it is completely insulting for an instructor to assume that because I'm "older," everything needs to be slowed down for me (I'm 53). As instructors, we need to ask every student what they want from the lesson.

Now returning thread back to original topic, sorry for the OT rant.
post #24 of 27
Thread Starter 
That was far from being off topic. In fact, I actually covered that issue in the article. Those of us who are of the boomer generation have been wroking out for years. To have some whipper snappper condescend to us is really annoying!

But this is the reason why we need to keep the instructors of "a cerain age" in shape!
post #25 of 27
At age 41 I had just gotten back into skiing after a 30 year hiatus, and had never gotten beyond the snowplow when I had skied (on Northland skis with double-laced boots). I have gotten better over the past few years (passed the PSIA level two skiing exam), and have met my original goal, which was to be able to ski anywhere my kids would until they reached teenager status. I can still outski them, and the youngest is now 14. I think in the next couple of years their youth will overwhelm my persistence, but for now it is mission accomplished. I do not avoid high speed, or bumps, but I do avoid a lot of skiing near the edge of trails where a misstep could be serious. I also feel perfectly fine saying that my legs are cooked and one last run would be a bad idea. Truly in skiing pride goeth before a fall.
post #26 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lisamarie View Post
That was far from being off topic. In fact, I actually covered that issue in the article. Those of us who are of the boomer generation have been wroking out for years. To have some whipper snappper condescend to us is really annoying!

But this is the reason why we need to keep the instructors of "a cerain age" in shape!
Do you know what issue the article will appear in yet?
post #27 of 27
LM, I work on balance more than I used to. More religious about pre-season conditioning than I used to be. I no longer ski myself into shape.
Running, biking and weight training in the pre-season.
Recently have been doing yoga and pilates (not for wimps)
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