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I hate moguls - Page 5

post #121 of 133
Richie -

At 41 I'm no kid, love to ski bumps but am far from an expert. When starting a bump run I actually say to myself "control your speed, control your speed, control your speed " until I find a rhythm. It's great when you find a sweet spot and get a zipper run but don't be afraid to leave the trough to scrub speed if you have to. Stay in your line and butter a flat ski on top of a mogul or edge set / pole plant a mogul face. Combine that with a little A&E and you will get to where you want to be. Also, like I posted earlier, find a blue/easy black tree run and work in there. The bumps tend to be softer, you will not have much company and the trees will force you to control your speed. Last find a softer ski to bump on. I know it's not cool but Rossi B2 or Legend 8K will do the trick and you can probably find 06 models on the cheap. Just beware, once you get your bump going you will wonder why you spent so much time running gates.
post #122 of 133
[quote=Richie-Rich;772225]
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pete No. Idaho View Post

That is the big problem, controlling my speed. The few times that I have actually tried to tackle the bumps I find myself very quickly acclerating to uncomfortable speeds, which makes me stomp on the brakes, stiffen the body and tax my muscles to exhaustion. I know the trick to moguls is to make your legs work like shock absorbers, but once I start picking up speed I basically panic. (Ironic since all I want to ever do is go fast...but there is a time and place for everything )
I suck at moguls, but I began to suck a lot less when I realized that I should be skiing them slower than slow. The trick is to keep your speed even lower than you want it to be. I will exagerate to make a point. If you are only going 1/2 a mile an hour you can keep that speed all day (might be a bit boring). It's when you try to go 15 or 20 mph that it's hard not to get going 40. Figure out what you think might be a reasonable speed, and then try skiing moguls at half that speed. Don't ski as slow as you have to; ski as slow as you can. Once you are used to that you can speed up a bit. Of course if your not used to crawling along at pedestrian speeds you will need a few hours of on-snow time at those speeds before things start to work for you.
post #123 of 133
richie there are a lot of really good people on here who get it and can help you ski bumps better and when you get better you start to love them obsess for them.

i always remember that if i start to geek in the bumps then i stop and gather myself to what what the heck my damage is that i just wasted a few turns in an otherwise lovely bump field and i'll just start over with all the right stuff

bro you have all the right stuff under all the bad stuff - you're an awesome bump skier ...you just don't know it.
post #124 of 133
Thread Starter 
I really apprecaite all of you giving me tips and encouragements. I dont want all your typing going to waste, so I will make an effort this winter on the bumps, maybe even sign up for a workshop.
post #125 of 133
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cabinfever View Post

At 41 I'm no kid, love to ski bumps but am far from an expert. When starting a bump run I actually say to myself "control your speed, control your speed, control your speed " until I find a rhythm. [/size]
I'm in my early 40's too, and I don't ski the bumps like I did when I was in my prime. But personally, when I'm in the bumps, I rarely find myself thinking about speed ( not that I'm a particularily fast skiier in the bumps, its just I dont feel the need to think about speed. ) IMHO, if you're finding that you need to try to control your speed in the bumps, that points to a bigger problem of you not being ABLE to control your speed. But that's just my opinion.
post #126 of 133
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by UtahPowderPig View Post
I'm in my early 40's too, and I don't ski the bumps like I did when I was in my prime. But personally, when I'm in the bumps, I rarely find myself thinking about speed ( not that I'm a particularily fast skiier in the bumps, its just I dont feel the need to think about speed. ) IMHO, if you're finding that you need to try to control your speed in the bumps, that points to a bigger problem of you not being ABLE to control your speed. But that's just my opinion.

No, thats not the case here, controlling my speed anywhere other than in the bumps is intuitively easy.
post #127 of 133
Quote:
Originally Posted by Richie-Rich View Post
No, thats not the case here, controlling my speed anywhere other than in the bumps is intuitively easy.
But I didn't think we were talking about "anywhere other than in the bumps", at least I wasn't.
post #128 of 133
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by UtahPowderPig View Post
But I didn't think we were talking about "anywhere other than in the bumps", at least I wasn't.
In that case yes, you are correct I find it most difficult to deal with the bumps while not accelerating. Once I start getting a sort of rythm (if you can call my spastic moves that) the speed picks up and "red alert" danger zone, hit the brakes hard...game over.
post #129 of 133
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ghost View Post
When I broke my wrist I tried skiing without poles. It felt odd at first, but after a few runs I was used to it. As I got a few more days of sking without poles, there was a new-found temptation to reach out and scrape the snow with an open hand (not on the day of the break, then I had a huge temptation to keep my hand elevated in front of my). I also found myself swinging my arms from side to side when I made tight turns in series like some dancer in a weird choreographed dance.
LOL. My guess is that you'd still swing your arms from side to side even with your poles. And that was my point of suggesting to ski without them.
post #130 of 133
Quote:
Originally Posted by Richie-Rich View Post
Once I start getting a sort of rythm the speed picks up and "red alert" danger zone, hit the brakes hard...game over.
Hmm. It sounds like a mental block more than anything. You even suggest this by acknologing that you are *able* to get into a rythm, but then you brain kicks in and prevents it from continuing. IMHO, without seeing a video of your skiing, you just need to ski the bumps more often.
post #131 of 133
OP: didn't have time to read the whole 4 pages, but my version is that 1) moguls are a fact of life, especially if you ever plan to ski bowls or backside or trees or any ungroomed area more than 2 hours after a major snowfall, and

b) they can save your bacon, even on the frontside. Consider a steep shaved frontside drop, ice punctuated only by a few bumps with a bit of shavings and crud piled on the uphill side. You will seek those bumps to turn on, erase speed, save your legs for a moment. Or in the trees between dumps, you can bank off the inevitable bumps, pause on them to scout a new line, rather than stop by faceplanting a trunk.

Bumps can be your friends, even if you don't invite them to dinner all the time.
post #132 of 133
Oh, and my .02 based on the last few posts. Others may disagree, but I think the toughest thing in the sport is to carve slowly in perfect control on hardpack. If you can rein it in or let it out at will, still doing railroad tracks, you can do almost anything. Understand it's a standard U.S. Ski Team practice, in fact.

I'd suggest taking some lessons on a green run in how to slow down until you're at a stop WITHOUT doing a hockey stop or wedging. Then a blue run. Once you can do that, it'll be a lot easier to pivot and skid on bumps without gaining too much speed.
post #133 of 133
Beyond, I really like that idea. Never thought about a drill like that, but it is something I'm gonna give a shot early in the season. I'm pretty good in bumps, but anything that makes me better is gravy. Thanks for the idea.
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