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Looking for one ski quiver...need help

post #1 of 29
Thread Starter 
I'm in the market for a new pair of sticks this year and was looking for some suggestions. I'm 6'2" tall, weigh 205 lbs., and skill level is advanced intermediate. I ski mainly in New England, and spend most of my time on groomed cruisers, but like steeper terrain. I'm probably weakest in the bumps, but really want to improve in this area too. Love the powder when we get it.

I've been looking into the Volkl AC2-AC4s and was looking for some more info about these as well as any other skis you feel might fit the bill.

Thanks so much!
Chris
post #2 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by SkiMac View Post
I'm in the market for a new pair of sticks this year and was looking for some suggestions. I'm 6'2" tall, weigh 205 lbs., and skill level is advanced intermediate. I ski mainly in New England, and spend most of my time on groomed cruisers, but like steeper terrain. I'm probably weakest in the bumps, but really want to improve in this area too. Love the powder when we get it.

I've been looking into the Volkl AC2-AC4s and was looking for some more info about these as well as any other skis you feel might fit the bill.

Thanks so much!
Chris
Welcome to Epicski!!!!! Look atound, try the search function and make yourself at home. Just make sure you keep your feet off the furniture and use a coaster!

As far as your question...
AC3. Stop drilling, you struck oil. i would stop you search right there then get into the more important question. Boots? What do you have? How old are they and have you ever had them properly "fit"?
post #3 of 29
Thread Starter 
Thanks for the welcome and reply!

I really liked the sound of the Volkl's so may have to stick with them...now to start saving so I can actually afford them.

My boots are a pair of Lange Vector 7's that I purchased about 2 years ago...had to replace those sweet rear-entry Nordica's I was still using! I like them a lot and probably don't even have them fully broken in yet.

Chris
post #4 of 29
Ditto on the AC3. That's a great ski for what you describe.
post #5 of 29
IMHO a "one ski quiver" is pretty much a marketing term and does not really exist. The best you can do is find something that works really well in most conditions you ski and acceptably in conditions you don't get too often. From the way you describe your skiing you are looking for a good hard snow and bump ski that will still do reasonalbly well in powder and crud. I agree with Phil that the AC3 seems to fit what you are looking for.

If you want a true one ski quiver the real issue is how wide a waist can you comfortably ski on hard pack and bumps. The wider the waist the harder it is to get on edge for carving but the better they will work in powder. One thing that can make your skis more versital are movable bindings. Some companies (like Atomic) make bindings that can easily (like in 5 sec. by the flick of a lever) be move forward and back between 2, 3 or 4 positions. I have found that by moving the bindings forward it will make them crave better, and moving them back makes them float better in the crud and powder. After deciding where you like them best for most skiing you can just set them back a notch on powder days to help keep your tips up in the deep stuff.
post #6 of 29
Volkl
post #7 of 29

No NO no

You don't want a ski like the ac3. It's 76mm under foot. You don't need or want that. Instead check out he supesport series. Perhaps the S5. It will perform great on th groomed, has a nice turnign radius and will be much easier to use in the bumps
post #8 of 29
IMO:

You don't need an expert level ski. So, you can easily find something for less money than an AC-3 that will allow you to improve faster than a stiffer ski will.

You also do not need a ski and wider than 70mm at the wast and narrower than that will be just fine too.

There are lots of very good skis available. The two Volkls that I would suggest are the AC-2 or perhaps the S4.

I tested over 60 ski models last year and found plenty of mid level skis that will fit your needs perfectly. Many of them are far less money than an AC-3 or similar.

Unless you ski 50 days a year, take bunches of lessons or gain 25 lbs....You will not outski them now, and you will not outgrow them anytime soon.

SJ
post #9 of 29
I'll be on a one-ski quiver this winter: K2 Phat Luvs. Every day, rain ice or shine.
post #10 of 29
I would prefer the Head Monster 72 over the Volkl AC2, personally, but either of those would make a great start. As would a Dynastar Legend 4800 for a simillar ski with a different feel.
post #11 of 29
I would look for a leftover AC3 from last season.
post #12 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by SierraJim View Post
IMO:

There are lots of very good skis available. The two Volkls that I would suggest are the AC-2 or perhaps the S4.


SJ
If S4 then I say S5. It is an easy ski to ski and has great performance. That would be my pick.

The AC3 is a great ski but the S5 would help you get better faster. It rewards good technique and won't demoralize you when you screw up.
post #13 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by onyxjl View Post
I would prefer the Head Monster 72 over the Volkl AC2, personally, but either of those would make a great start. As would a Dynastar Legend 4800 for a simillar ski with a different feel.
If new englang skiing = frequent ice, I wouldn't advise a 4800. Not much grip.
To the Volkl suggestions, I'll add a rossi Z5 or Z9.
post #14 of 29

2005/06 Rossi Zenith Z5 Ti Oversize

I have the last year's Rossi Z5 for sale, 126-74-105 @ 176, with Axial 120 Ti integrated-binding system, which means no drilling required. I believe this (Z9/Z5) is Rossi' answer to Atomic B5/B11 (one-ski quiver) but more forgiving. A friend of mine rode it for 10 days last season - recently moved to Hawaii. They are in perfect condition top to bottom except a couple of very tiny (u have to look for them) dings on top sheet due to crossing skis together. This years Ross Z5 is identical to last years. The Z5 is same in dimensions as Z9, and same construction in all but Z5 has carbon fiber instead of metal.

Anyway, I am trying get as much ca$h for him as I can.
What is a fair price? $325-350?
post #15 of 29
I don't get the AC2/3/4 comments for someone who spends most of their time on groomed cruisers. Completely wrong ski IMO.

Go for a nice carver that will handle the New England ice yet still has some potential for trees and the like - Fischer RX8 or something similar.
post #16 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by Paul Jones View Post
If S4 then I say S5. It is an easy ski to ski and has great performance. That would be my pick.

The AC3 is a great ski but the S5 would help you get better faster. It rewards good technique and won't demoralize you when you screw up.
Paul:

I wonder if you have skied the S5? I have, (alongside 20 other similar models) and I have to respectfully disagree that it is an "easy" ski. Good ski?.....absolutely! Great ski?....maybe! But an easy ski for an Intermediate? I personally don't think so. The new S5 has way more grip and energy than the prior 5* this can be fatiguing and generally rough on an intermediate.

I try to keep in mind that a mid level skier needs a ski that he can feather and schmear easily as well as carve. The stiffer the ski, the rougher this is. I'm an expert level skier (5-10" 188) on anybody's scale but I am constantly amazed how great the mid level stuff is. A really good mid level ski is good enough for me at least 80% of the time and way easier going 100% of the time.

This is not a flame directed at you at all, this is just my (pretty experienced) opinion. "Growing into" todays crop of expert stuff can be a tall order given that most of the mid level skis are really as much or even more than necessary for most aspiring L-7 skiers. There is just no need to over-equip.

If I were ever to take another PSIA L-3 exam (god help me.....: ) I would not choose a really agressive ski to do it on.

SJ
post #17 of 29
I would second the thought of the Monster 72. It's ideal for alpine conditions which, I believe, are similar to your East Coast conditions. For its width, the edge grip and ice behaviour amazing - better than many 68mm waist skis I tried last year - plus it has the width to cope with reasonable off piste if you feel like venturing there. Worth considering imo
post #18 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by SierraJim View Post
I'm an expert level skier (5-10" 188) on anybody's scale but I am constantly amazed how great the mid level stuff is. A really good mid level ski is good enough for me at least 80% of the time and way easier going 100% of the time.

If I were ever to take another PSIA L-3 exam (god help me.....: ) I would not choose a really agressive ski to do it on.

SJ
I think SJ makes a very good point here. My experience is very similar.
post #19 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by SierraJim View Post
. I'm an expert level skier (5-10" 188) on anybody's scale but I am constantly amazed how great the mid level stuff is. A really good mid level ski is good enough for me at least 80% of the time and way easier going 100% of the time.

This is not a flame directed at you at all, this is just my (pretty experienced) opinion. "Growing into" todays crop of expert stuff can be a tall order given that most of the mid level skis are really as much or even more than necessary for most aspiring L-7 skiers. There is just no need to over-equip.

If I were ever to take another PSIA L-3 exam (god help me.....: ) I would not choose a really agressive ski to do it on.

SJ
perfectly stated.
post #20 of 29
Fischer RX-6's, AMC 73's and AMC 76's would all fill your needs, depending on how much soft snow you thought you might see in a season. In fact any of the stiffer skis in the 66-76 mm waist width, with radii around 18 meters will serve you well. These include Atomics, Fischers, Nordicas and Volkls. IMO at your weight you might be less impressed with Dynastars, but I haven't tried this year's selections. Salomons ski differently, and if you give them a chance they could work for you. I haven't tried some other brands with good write-ups, like Blizzard, Head and Rossignol. I think you are seeking skis at the heart of the market, and should find an incredible range of acceptable skis. Just go to any ski shop and ask them for ten gallons of regular.
post #21 of 29
this--an old Head im 70, similar to the im 72 might work--I think in 177 for a guy your size, though I'm curious what others would say on length

http://levelninesports.com/head-2005...7cm-p-580.html
post #22 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by cometjo View Post
this--an old Head im 70, similar to the im 72 might work--I think in 177 for a guy your size, though I'm curious what others would say on length

http://levelninesports.com/head-2005...7cm-p-580.html
Length depends on the ski and the recommendations of the manufacturer. Some of those Metrons are recommended in some short lengths. In general I'd say 170-177 for the skis I mentioned. If you were to try one of the slalom cut skis, I'd suggest going shorter, but I would suggest that a longer radius might be easier for all-day skiing, and for the bumps. One thing that might be very different from ski to ski in this market is how the tail is shaped. Some skis keep the radius going all the way from the foot to the tail, like Atomics and Fischers, but others have straighter tails, which apparently can help some skiers in moguls.
post #23 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by SierraJim View Post
Paul:

I'm an expert level skier (5-10" 188) on anybody's scale but I am constantly amazed how great the mid level stuff is. A really good mid level ski is good enough for me at least 80% of the time and way easier going 100% of the time.


SJ
This is the most sensible statement I've read in a long time. Thank you SierraJim.
post #24 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by SierraJim View Post
IMO:

You don't need an expert level ski. So, you can easily find something for less money than an AC-3 that will allow you to improve faster than a stiffer ski will.

You also do not need a ski and wider than 70mm at the wast and narrower than that will be just fine too.

I tested over 60 ski models last year and found plenty of mid level skis that will fit your needs perfectly. Many of them are far less money than an AC-3 or similar.

Unless you ski 50 days a year, take bunches of lessons or gain 25 lbs....You will not outski them now, and you will not outgrow them anytime soon.

SJ

A glimpse of sanity among this group of "gotta have the top level gear" crowd. Reminds me of a Brooklyn guy I took into the aid room with a blown ACL last year, he was on top level race skis. When I took his info, he was on his third day skiing ever. I spoke to his GF, and found out he went into a ski shop insisting he wanted the best.
Just had to say that when reading these gear threads, Jim is always consistently right on......
post #25 of 29

Great turns for only $700!

Just because you can't buy a turn dosen't mean that there isn't a thriving market.
post #26 of 29
Based on these comments maybe Skimac should check out the Fischer RX6 that Jim has on his site for $329. A pretty good deal. If I were looking at that level I would jump on that!
post #27 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by FOG View Post
Fischer RX-6's...Just go to any ski shop and ask them for ten gallons of regular.
Definitely consider this ski. Check the Fischer website for your local retailer, these can be more difficult to find.

Cheers,

Michael
post #28 of 29

No flam detected

Quote:
Originally Posted by SierraJim View Post
Paul:

I try to keep in mind that a mid level skier needs a ski that he can feather and schmear easily as well as carve. The stiffer the ski, the rougher this is. I'm an expert level skier (5-10" 188) on anybody's scale but I am constantly amazed how great the mid level stuff is. A really good mid level ski is good enough for me at least 80% of the time and way easier going 100% of the time.

There is just no need to over-equip.
Buying too much ski is a common problem. I agree with your point. To me the s5 was so easy to ski. But it probably is still too much ski for this level. I really don't know much about the s4.

I think we do agree on the need to buy a ski that is appropriate for the level of the skier. Too much ski will limit improvement.
post #29 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by mudfoot View Post
Just because you can't buy a turn dosen't mean that there isn't a thriving market.
Now THAT is good!!........................

SJ
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