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Rear Entry vs. Overlap

post #1 of 13
Thread Starter 
Is there any advantage to putting first year skiers in overlap boots over rear entry's? The kids like the rear entry's better due to the comfort and ease of getting in and out of them.

Should I be concerned about a lack of performance in rear entry's for a first season? I expect them to get about 20 days in this winter and my only goal is to have fun.

Also their ages are 7 and 6 if that matters.

Tom
post #2 of 13
I'm gonna say it depends on thier size. You want them to be able to flex the boot, but not just fold it up. Some rear entrys will barely move at all, same goes for some of the overlaps. If they prefer the rear entry, that is fine. Just make sure it fits and that they can flex it.
post #3 of 13
If you want an answer from a woman who takes 14 kids skiing every other week( most of which are under the age of 10) I say go for rear entry for first year kids.
Have you ever helped a bunch of kids get their ski equipment together?

If you're asking the woman who goes skiing with her friends kids and wants to see performance out of a boot for them, buckle front all the way.
post #4 of 13
Thread Starter 
I had no idea a 40 lb kid could flex a boot. I did not pay much attrention to the flex but I will from now on.
post #5 of 13
A 30 lb kid can flex a boot if the boot can flex.
post #6 of 13
My kids skied for all of their early years in Solomon rear entries. There design allowed for a nice flex and the flex was adjustable too. They did quite well with them. There were many rear entries around that were junk, didn't support and didn't flex. Who is still making rear entries these days? LewBob
post #7 of 13
Thread Starter 
The boots are used. They had a decent selection of Tecnica, Solomon, and Nordica. The price range was between $20 - $40 depending on how old they are and what type of shape they are in.

Based on the advice you guys are giving me. I'm going to get the most comfortable pair that they can flex.

Thank you for the advice.

Tom
post #8 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jahmi View Post
The boots are used. They had a decent selection of Tecnica, Solomon, and Nordica. The price range was between $20 - $40 depending on how old they are and what type of shape they are in.

Based on the advice you guys are giving me. I'm going to get the most comfortable pair that they can flex.

Thank you for the advice.

Tom
I assume you are buying at a swap. If you can figure out how to get the liner out (and back in) be sure to do a shell fit. This can be a little tricky with a rear-entry sometimes there are some sort of tabs holding it in. Just for reference, with the liner out and thier toe just touching the end of the shell you should be able to fit two fingers behind thier heel.
post #9 of 13
Thread Starter 
I'm purchasing from a local shop. They have a trade up program where past customers trade their old equipment in for new or used stuff. The program is only a couple of years old so most of the gear is not that old.

I just picked up 2 sets of last years skis for fairly reasonable prices. My sons where $60.00 and in excellent condition and my daughter's where $70.00 and in good condition. I may have got hosed a little on my daughters but the are pink and that is what makes her happy. Past experience has taught me that she wants to spend more time on the things she can identify with as being hers and not her brothers hand me downs.
post #10 of 13
I don't think performance figures prominently with most 6-7 year olds. Based on my experience, comfort is the big issue.

That said, while rear entry boots are certainly easier to deal with in terms of getting on and off, I found my kids more were more comfortable in overlap boots because of their adjustability. Any better performance was a bonus.

With rear entry boots, your adjustment options are pretty much limited to open, closed, and closed tightly. Overlap boots let you adjust the boot at the toes, ankle, and cuff (if your kids are really industrious, you might catch them doing it themselves).
post #11 of 13
I'm moving my 5 (soon to be 6 year old) to overlaps this year. He was in rear entries at age 4-5 because thats all they had for his size. I don't think it made much difference at that age from a performance/learning aspect, but it sure was more convenient and easier for him. Now I am putting him in overlaps so that as he progresses the boot will "grow" with him and I also want him to get used to having 3-4 buckles.
post #12 of 13
The important thing is to make sure the left boot goes on the left foot and the right boot goes on the right foot. I have stopped a number of times on intermidiate slopes even to ask a parent and child are you having any trouble. The parent would say, I don't understand it. My child skied this yesterday with no problem and today its seems impossible for my child to ski it. How can this be. My response is ahh it could be the location of the boots.
post #13 of 13
I have to go with Trekchic, unless their 1st yr. skiers the front entry seems better. I've taught tons of kids w/both & you can better adjust for little tootsie's that aren't happy w/front fit. The rear entry, unless you have custom insoles (which rental shops don't offer) tend to fit a little sloppy. Happy feet=Happy skiers!
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