or Connect
EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › Ski Gear Discussion › 100% Waterproof Ski Pants
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

100% Waterproof Ski Pants

post #1 of 31
Thread Starter 
I'm using the Marmot Storm King pants for the majority of my days, but I alos need some waterproof pants. The kind that I can wear all day in pouring rain without getting even damp. Any suggestions?
post #2 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by epic View Post
I'm using the Marmot Storm King pants for the majority of my days, but I alos need some waterproof pants. The kind that I can wear all day in pouring rain without getting even damp. Any suggestions?
when I rode with you guys at Killington my Marmot Jacket did not leak one bit, one of the highlights of the day for me Phil was soaked, I was dry. I try to find out what kinda of material it was and post it up here.
post #3 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by BushwackerinPA View Post
when I rode with you guys at Killington my Marmot Jacket did not leak one bit, one of the highlights of the day for me Phil was soaked, I was dry. I try to find out what kinda of material it was and post it up here.
Yes I was. I was in a seam-sealed Columbia Titanium jacket that leaked but my paints were some old K2 shells that were only good for keeping the dirt off of me. I really didn't have the proper rain gear.
post #4 of 31
Pouring rain and not even damp. Quite a challenge. Even Gortex pants seem to allow water through on the thighs and butt on the ride up the lift.

Real protection would be real rain (plastic or rubber) bibs. Most outdoor stores sell them. They are usually green or yellow. Saw some when I was skiing Crystal Mt WA last year.

Not stylish but they are the best bet.
post #5 of 31
Hmm, I'd have guessed any good quality gortex type membrane pant in decent shape would keep dry even in the rain. My introduction to gortex was an all day patrol competition in an all day rain a few years back and I never got wet from the rain. I sweated my tail off---but the breathable waterproof part worked very very well.

You could use those butt pad things on the lift--I forget the name, they attach at teh waist and around each thigh and you sit on neoprene.

That should add a level of protection as well.
post #6 of 31
If its raining its warm, if its warm, you'll sweat. Staying bone dry in the pouring rain= impossible.
post #7 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by zion zig zag View Post
If its raining its warm, if its warm, you'll sweat. Staying bone dry in the pouring rain= impossible.
disagree I have ridden in the rain with a cycle jersey, and and my new jacket and it really isnt that hot and 100 percent waterproof. That biking riding which is alot harded than skiing aerobic wise. Phil can vouch that thing was bone dry inside. For skiing this thing is going to be great with fleece underneath.

Problem is I cna find the model on Marmot website to post up nothing on there looks like my jacket.
post #8 of 31
I would think some high-end XCR pants from Arc'Teryx, Mtn Hardwear, Marmot, etc would do the job.
post #9 of 31
I got some Arc'teryx Javalin SV pants that I swear you could snorkle in and not get wet. All seam sealed and waterproof zippers. They are just shells, but I don't need much else aside from my cotton long johns.

(just kidding, don't tell me about cotton.)
post #10 of 31
http://www.musto.co.uk/productdetail...productId=1432

There you go, 100% waterproof (even in the southern ocean), won’t rip, and NO ONE else will be wearing them on the hill... actually with a good baselayer underneith these might not be all that far off...
post #11 of 31
I agree with the Arc'Teryx cooments. I have a pair of Arc'Teryx I got cheap from Sierra Traders in a really ugly color and they are rain proof and I don't sweat in them. Most brands leak through zippers and pockets but not these babies.

Gloves, helmet and goggles in the rain are another story though.
post #12 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by BushwackerinPA View Post
disagree I have ridden in the rain with a cycle jersey, and and my new jacket and it really isnt that hot and 100 percent waterproof. That biking riding which is alot harded than skiing aerobic wise. Phil can vouch that thing was bone dry inside. For skiing this thing is going to be great with fleece underneath.

Problem is I cna find the model on Marmot website to post up nothing on there looks like my jacket.

I hope you didn't quit school to move to UT. Is English your second language?

Maybe it's me but I sweat when it's 20 outside, much less 40.
post #13 of 31
I have always wondered about wearing fireman's pants. or the waterproof slickers that garbage men wear (they look just like fireman's pants, all bright yellow/green with reflector taped cuffs).

I've seen a few folks on the mountains with them. They are definitely water (and fire) proof.

I bought some Helly Hanson "Gorton's Fisherman" gear last year at REI, but never wore it skiing. Only got the jacket. It's waterproof rubber, but in no way breathable, so it gets a mite bit hot. May spring on some pants.

Though honestly, I only skied one day last year where it "rained" and it was gropple (sp?) in Brighton. I got soaked through and through (my ratty Grandoe gloves bled through and stained my hands a deep indigo!).
post #14 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by skier_j View Post
...My introduction to gortex was an all day patrol competition in an all day rain a few years back and I never got wet from the rain. I sweated my tail off---but the breathable waterproof part worked very very well...
You sweated profusely in a pouring rain and stayed dry? That's amazing. I'd like to try some of this "Gore-tex". Sounds great!
post #15 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by BushwackerinPA View Post
...Problem is I cna find the model on Marmot website to post up nothing on there looks like my jacket.
It's definitley not the same Marmot jacket I have...
post #16 of 31
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by dookey67 View Post
Though honestly, I only skied one day last year where it "rained" and it was gropple (sp?) in Brighton.
I believe it's "grauple".
post #17 of 31
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by zion zig zag View Post
If its raining its warm, if its warm, you'll sweat. Staying bone dry in the pouring rain= impossible.
I dunno about that. It certainly is harder to stay dry if it's raining. Gore-Tex is pretty cool though because water vapor can go through it and (in theory anyway) liquid water cannot. I remember many years ago there was a Gore-Tex booth at the sailing show in Atlantic City. They had gloves that were nothing but a Gore-Tex membrane. They'd put water in it and then put it on your hand. You'd put your hand in a cold tub of water and in a few minutes, it would be dry. Somehow your body heat would drive the water through the membrane. Of course, if you are in a rainforest and the temperature is the same on both sides of the membrane it won't work, but in 34 degree weather, it should.

My Gore-Tex Marmot Pants (Randonee Bibs to be exact) do not stay dry at all. OK, they are better than the softshells, but as soon as I sit on a lift my ass is wet. I know it's not my sweat. The ass on these things is one piece of Gore-Tex and near as I can tell, it doesn't have any holes. My uniform jacket on the other hand is also a Marmot Gore-tex piece. I'm not sure what model, but it is damn near impregnable.

I need these pants for when I am teaching, so they must be black and cannot have cargo pockets. Marmot will warranty my Randonees again, so I'd like to go that route if anyone has had a good experience with one of thier pieces. Otherwise, I'll get whatever it takes. I hate teaching when my balls are wet...
post #18 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by epic View Post
I believe it's "grauple".
Graupel
post #19 of 31
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by telerod15 View Post
Graupel
There ya go. Now... how about some pants?

Anyone rockin' the Cloudveils?

Anyone else ski in monsoon conditions?
post #20 of 31
How to stay dry, comfortable, and have fun in monsoon conditions - two ways:

(a) Wear plastic garbage bags (at least two), get DNA transplants and become Barb Marshall; or

(b) Stay inside (but if I could ski like Barb Marshall I wouldn't mind the garbage bags and pet hair).
post #21 of 31
How to stay comfortable and have fun in monsoon conditions.........
Wear a underlayer that will wick water away from your skin .
Buy good quality water resistant outer clothing.

Practice rain ignortion. Stay warm by keeping yourself moving and think of what you are trying to accomplish.
No raingear is rainproof. Water gets down the neck, up the arms, through the venting and if not you will sweat and still be wet in places. . Warmth means the most. Change your middle layers for keeping yourself as comfortable as you can.
I lived and worked outside , living in Seattle most of my life. I know rain and rain has met me.
I use differant kinds of waterproof breathable outerwear. It usually loses it's ability ro keep you dry over time so replacing your stuff is important. It is not always important to spend money on the most expensive stuff out there. But like everything quality does mean alot
post #22 of 31
I went skiing at Kirkwood last year around the Christmas holidays. We had lots of rain. AFTER that I bought the Arc'teryx sidewinder shell and Javalin SV pants. This has worked perfectly as I haven't been rained on since.
post #23 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by epic View Post
I'm using the Marmot Storm King pants for the majority of my days, but I alos need some waterproof pants. The kind that I can wear all day in pouring rain without getting even damp. Any suggestions?
Huggies?

Actually, I have a pair of Marmot Bib pants and they work in ANYTHING - never had an iota of water get in - and they breathe fine.

I also have a red Marmot Alpinist shell that I've owned for about 10 years. With a wash, it still looks new - and better than some of the current designs (IMHO).

I'd buy Marmot again. It costs more, but after 10 years, you've paid less than $40 per year.
post #24 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by Captain_Strato View Post
Huggies?
yep turned inside out problem fixed....

my jacket is a Marmot Minimalist light weight gore tex after 3 time riding in the rain thoughly impressed with it.
post #25 of 31
Grangers Waterproofing Home

i tried this on all i own for skiing "new and old" including a cb nylon pullover and seems to work real well. My marmot randee bibs were going into 2nd season and had lost there waterproof properties and was reallly pissed so i search and found a cleaner and waterproofer...followed directions and seems pretty good also used on my 2 pairs of Cabelas GORE-TEX® Pinnacle Gloves
post #26 of 31
Sessions Summit jaket and Ripzone Trilogy pants didn't leak a bit after day of skiing in pouring rain, not even damp :-) . But this is snowboarders clothing, and they use own membaranes to make it waterproof
post #27 of 31
Try this stuff for your pants. I did some research this summer when I was jonezin for som pow, lol. This needs to be done yearly and the stuff is cheap. You can find at backcountry, etc. I got cheap pants and it works on them damn good, NOT FOR JUST Gore-tex.
From Gore's website:
“Wet out” can put a real damper on your day. That’s when liquid saturates your garment’s outer fabric layer above the GORE-TEX® membrane, leaving you feeling damp and clammy - as if your garment were leaking, even when it’s not.
To prevent wet out, all GORE-TEX® shell fabrics are treated with an ultra-thin treatment called DWR, a durable water repellent polymer that is applied to the outermost fabric layer. DWR penetrates the fibers and lowers the surface tension of the fabric, causing water to bead up and roll off this outer layer of fabric, instead of being absorbed.
DWR is not permanent, though. Regular wear and tear, plus exposure to dirt, detergents, insect repellent, and other impurities can shorten its lifespan. The good news is that restoring the water repellency of your GORE-TEX® shell is extremely easy.


How to Restore Water Repellency

GORE-TEX® outerwear:
Just machine wash it, rinse it, and put it in the dryer, being sure to follow the manufacturer’s instructions on the care label inside. The washing removes dirt and other contaminants and the heat from the dryer helps redistribute the DWR treatment on the fabric surface.
If water fails to bead up on the surface of your cleaned and tumble-dried garment, its DWR treatment has reached the end of its useful life. But don’t worry: You can restore the garment’s water repellency by applying a topical water repellency restorative (DWR treatment) for outdoor fabrics, available at your local outdoor retailer. We do not recommend wash-in treatments, as they can hinder your garment's breathability.
Nikwax:
http://www.tramdock.com/tramdock/gro...cessories.html



or Better: ReviveX work great.
http://ezflyfish.stores.yahoo.net/simgorrev.html
post #28 of 31
^^^^was gonna post that about wet out, but I was being lazy.

As far as good pants go the best pants I've had are the Eiders I bought last season.
post #29 of 31
Quote:
Originally Posted by epic View Post
There ya go. Now... how about some pants?

Anyone rockin' the Cloudveils?

Anyone else ski in monsoon conditions?
My brother is all Cloudveil, I'm all Patagonia...What pants are you talking about?

He uses the Drizzle jacket, which I don't think they make anymore, but it's very close to 100% waterproof I bet.

If you can layer your pants somehow you may want to look at Patagonia's "Rain Shadow" pants.
post #30 of 31
Agree with the statemenst 'restore the DWR finish'. In fact, your description below is a clear signal the DWR finish on the back-end of your pants is not working. All you have to do is restore it, in the correct manner.

Quote:
Originally Posted by epic View Post
OK, they are better than the softshells, but as soon as I sit on a lift my ass is wet. I know it's not my sweat. The ass on these things is one piece of Gore-Tex and near as I can tell, it doesn't have any holes. My uniform jacket on the other hand is also a Marmot Gore-tex piece. I'm not sure what model, but it is damn near impregnable.
Here's another good source, http://www.nikwax-usa.com/en-us/, almost all outdoor stores sell their products. And at one time GoreTex used to recommend TX Direct, along with a few others brands, as one of the products that can restore a DWR finish. Don't see that on the GoreTex website anymore, though.

Also, pay close attention to how you launder the pants before applying the DWR restore, follow the links above, for example, if you use common household detergents, none of the liquid variety, always powder, etc.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Ski Gear Discussion
EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › Ski Gear Discussion › 100% Waterproof Ski Pants