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Can I get some MA my epicski brothers!!! (video of Highway Star) - Page 4

post #91 of 801
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Skidude72 View Post
I gotta agree with you here....most of the "Instructors" here have no idea, and have never taught someone at your level...grabbing at straws they are. Can you improve hell ya...but they have no clue how to get you there....as for your long turns...not bad...not great...no ski performance, you are just getting on edge and riding the rail...great demo of what one particular "no creditial, but "I know everything" loser thinks is great"....wide stance in the fall-line, narrow in the transition....you moves are ok, but the timing is out.

At the end of the turn, you should be working the tail of the ski, if you look at the turn right in front of the camera you will see the bulk of the snow starting to come from the mid forebody of the ski, you are still on the tip...too far forward for a gs turn finish....you need to be straightening the ankle and letting that tail WORK! However, and I hate to harp on this, but if you were one of my athletes, i would be kicking your ass with this....once you work like that, the skis will perform and the forces will build big time....you will need very solid core and leg strength to pull your feet back under you in the transition to start the next turn.....you just dont seem to have it...pick up any book on racing or the CSIA manual talke about the effect of technique on performance, and then about how technique with strength on performance....you ski well, just no power.
Quote:
Originally Posted by ski_nerd13 View Post
"Good" Skiing is too general. Your definition of good and someone else's is going to differ incredibly.

I view "good" as effective and efficient, because that is the way that I have been trained to analyze skiers. So here is what I see specifically in the 3rd vid:

1.) Biggest problem - I see that you are trying to be too dynamic in your movements. The large up-unweighting at the beginning of the turn/extreme flexion at the end of the turn is taking away from the natural performance of the ski. I catch myself doing this whenever I am trying to maximize the forces in skiing and get going real fast while still making turns. It seems you get quite low to the ground (extreme flexion) which causes your inside ski to shoot out from underneath your body as it flexes more, thus making your ability to change edges simultaneously difficult. Also because of the extreme flexion the pressure gets out of control at the end of your turn.

Have to run, will add more later.

Hope this helps.


-nerd
Ok, this is good, now we're getting somewhere.

You guys are pointing to certain aspects of my technique that are intentional, and some that aren't.

In the superstar carving clip:

The last turn where I cross in front of the camera is not completed off the tail intentionally. I'm making a 90+ degree turn at 35+ mph across and directly above two people, like 30-50 feet away (see the dude in the red jacket?)...I ride the middle-front of the ski in that case to stay in a position of steering power, and make sure I don't go flying into somebody. Sure, I could have gone to the tail, but that means I have a much better chance of not working the tail right, not continuing my turn properly, and hitting somebody.....too risky. There's a difference between skiing defensively, and skiing smart.

I can't tell if I'm intentionally inducing a bit of skid/spray (push) to check speed, but I certainly agree I could be riding the edge cleaner in that turn....I'm ahead of the sweet spot. Look at the 5-6 turns above that one, those look the cleanest to me, and I seem to be riding the outside ski well. The sweet spot on that ski is the middle/back, where the entire edge engages and carves cleanly. Now......should I be using more fore-to-aft weighting through the turn? I used to do that much more, but I thought that we should move away from that with modern technique? I've found on those head's, there's really no reason to pound on the tips to initiate, the tips are so wide that just rolling on edge with some slight forward pressure seems to be enough to initiate a turn....but I could be laying into them harder. I agree I am not working the tails enough on most of those turns either (or by pushing the outside ski forward to complete)....I can do that wherever I want to in a turn....late, or very early....like the fiddle clip, where I'm intentionally sking the back of the ski. Subjectively, how much of that kind of rear weighting to complete a turn is acceptable or prefered, and when should it be started?

On the issue of extreme movements, unweighting, and trying too hard - I'm trying to ski with a very high edge angle on my outside ski, with a relatively straight leg....I'm clearly hitting 60-70 degrees, with about 80% of my weight on the outside ski. Now, the inside ski is not hitting that angle, it only gets up to about 45 degrees - I'm not weighting it much (but the weighting is slightly rearward), and it's not determining turn shape.....it's sort of along for the ride, but I'll use it to catch myself if my outside ski gets knocked off line etc. I have my inside knee bent quite a bit, keeping that leg/boot/ski out of the way of the downhill ski. I want to be able put my inside ass cheek nearly on the snow, or be able to touch the snow with my hand, and have been able to do this on slightly steeper pitches. Subjectively, is this good technique? I think it's pretty similar to what I see out of most WC GS skiers......and if not, where am I falling short? (I would say I use the inside ski less and don't angle it enough, get more upright in transitions, keep a straight upper body, plus the I don't have the strength and balance.)

I would also like to point out that I am clearly not unweighting signifigantly between turns......I do get very upright, because I am not staying low between turns. I'm basicly riding out the straight outside leg to complete the turn at around a 30 degree edge angle, which means I'm close to upright the end of a turn. This means I can turn like I am without actually having to use any leg strength, or expend much energy......just flex at the hip....it's quite energy and strength efficient.....which is probably why it looks lazy to a race coach (SkiDude72), and like I'm working too hard to a freeskier or advanced skier (ski nerd, zig zag). Is this good, bad, ugly, or subjective?
post #92 of 801
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob Peters View Post
What's a waterbar?
A waterbar is a man made ditch across a slope that is designed to control erosion by channeling downtrail flowing water to the side of a trail. Normally they fill in fairly quickly, but in low depth conditions they can be ruder than a cat track.
post #93 of 801
Highway Star,

Why do you ask for MA and then poo poo everything anybody tries to tell you? Then you go back and forth with the "you don't know what you're talking about" / "I'm sorry I'll listen this time" thing. It's all very weird. If you just want people to watch and enjoy your skiing post it in the main forum - but since you posted it in the instruction forum this tells people you are looking to be critiqued - take like a man!

OK for your skiing. Let me say, that I am no PSIA guy (never had a lesson in my life) I'm just a bag of tricks learned through trial and error and, just a hunch, but I think that we are very close skill wise - I just may even be better if you believe that. So are you going to listen to me?

You ARE in the back seat and, especially in the first clip, it is hindering you. If I were helping you I would start with 2 simple tricks:

1. Your arms are way up and back - keep them more in front of you. If you want to turn left in that mangy snow, drive your right hand forward and a bit to the left. This will keep your weight where it needs to be and give you added leverage on the skis allowing easier, more powerful turning in crappy snow.

2. You are keeping your tips up by just sitting low and back. That's a fine start but you're not done - you want to get your feet more under you. One great trick to do this is to pull your toes up towards your shins. That pulls the tips up and actually has the effect of pulling the skis further back in relation to your body, effectively getting your center of mass more up toward the center of the ski. Watch Seth Morrison ski powder and you'll see it (that's where I got it from and it worked).

I realize the snow is WAY better here but I think you can see both things I'm talking about in this pick. Notice where my right arm is - much lower and more in front of my body than where you would have it. Notice how low I am - but yet I'm pulling my feet up and getting my feet under me and my weight centered over my skis.
post #94 of 801


I'm surprised you still have your ACLs
post #95 of 801
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by bklyntrayc View Post


I'm surprised you still have your ACLs
Come ski with me some time, sweetie....
post #96 of 801
Quote:
Originally Posted by Highway Star View Post
Come ski with me some time, sweetie....
Maybe I can inspire you to keep your hips and hands forward
post #97 of 801
Highway Star,

I really like the air entry.

There will always be questionable advice when you posts requests on the Internet. The proper response is "Thank you, that's nice." (hint - that's a free set up line)

BTW - thanks for NOT posting the 5 minute clip of your top to bottom descent of Whistler. We only need a few turns to evaluate technique. The rest is all for show.

Personally, I've found that it's far easier to critique skiing in nasty snow and rocks than it it is to ski it perfectly. One of the traditional adjustments for skiing heavy deep snow is to go faster to float higher in it. That wouldn't be prudent on a narrow trail with rocks to also deal with. Another adjustment is to close your ankles more than normal to bring the ski tips up. For many people, this is easier said than done. Sometimes in these conditions I've been able to stay more centered by bouncing the tips down to the bottom and rebounding up out of the muck to be in position to start the new turn. And sometimes I've found that back seat brute force techniques are a lot more fun than trying to be a movie star or eating a rock.
post #98 of 801
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by bklyntrayc View Post
Maybe I can inspire you to keep your hips and hands forward
Oh yeah!
post #99 of 801
You know HS, I think it is pretty brave to put up a couple of videos of yourself and ask for critique. Personally, looking at your video’s closely, I saw much similarity to my skiing style and have really examined and considered the posts. The responses have given me some areas to rethink and improve upon for this season (much better than watching all the Warren Miller DVD’s of perfect form). All this benefit of course, without experiencing first hand criticism, which is hard to do.

It can be uncomfortable reading criticism from your peers especially if it falls farther outside the preconceived boundaries one may have started with. This can cause an unanticipated defensive posture that get’s everything out of whack. That’s unfortunate, as I find most folks admire the bravery of someone sincerely asking for help finding it therefore important to provide their most thoughtful and constructive criticism. The lesson for all of us is matching our bravery of putting it all out there with the humility of accepting the feedback.

Good Skiing!!
post #100 of 801
Quote:
Originally Posted by Highway Star View Post
Come ski with me some time, sweetie....
Be careful what you wish for... pumpkin.

[My comments will come when I am out of work]
post #101 of 801
I don't know how significant this is to you, and its not a MA, but are you aware you are picking up the inside ski at turn initiation? Especially in left turns in that third clip. This is causing you to really rise up high at transition and means the inside ski doesn't engage in the turn until you are well across the fall line. I can pick up on this because I also do it and have to think about inside (LTE) engagement to smooth out a carved turn.
post #102 of 801
A vintage EpicSki threat in so many ways.

Okay, I'll bite, I can't resist.

HS you look exactly like me about 150 ski days ago. I now ski noticeable, though not tremendously better. So, I've lived through the improvement you are looking to make. Those are my qualifications to give you advice. And I am now going to repeat much of what has been said.

1. You are on waaaay too much ski. What do you weigh, 160? You just don't have enough combined mass, strength and technique to bend those things. Lose 10cm AT LEAST, better yet, 20. Get softer skis. It has nothing to do with what you "like" it is what you can ski.

2. You are balancing too far back relative to your feet. And I know why. Because of #1, the only way you can turn those things is to get back on them and pivot them around. Get shorter, softer skis, and you will find you can turn them properly, from a centered stance. You should be initiating your turns by driving the tips of the ski into the snow through pressure on your shins. You are not, you are initiating through pivoting your legs, and then once you have an edge set up, only then are you engaging anything resembling forward lean.

3. Relax. Your hands are waving all over, you are weighting and unweighting like a hyperactive 12 year old. Don't try so hard, as someone already said. And no, that's not freeskier vs. race coach. Racers have less upper body movement than you do and they are going 80mph on ice. Skiing those family friendly trails of yours, they would like like they were sitting in an easy chair.

In the vid through the trees, you look like a different person, a much better skier. I think that is because the soft snow neutralizes the issue with the skis, you don't need to bend them to make turns in that sweet sweet pow, and you are having a blast, and aren't thinking about, and thus overdoing, your technique.

4. Finish your turns. Let the skis come around more, so that can control your speed without skidding and you build up more torque, which will help you flow into the next turn.

4. How do you accomplish the above? Well, the first one requires $, but the other three? Drills and Blue Runs. Take a one hour private from a level III instructor, tell them you want 3 drills you can use on your own that will help with your basic technique flaws. Then do those for an hour every day you go skiing. Then go ski some blues for another hours, making relaxed, smooth turns that link from one to the next.

Good luck.
post #103 of 801
Nicely done, Arnold... And welcome to EpicSki...
post #104 of 801
Quote:
Originally Posted by ssh View Post
Nicely done, Arnold... And welcome to EpicSki...
I don't get the "vintage" comment with 1 post though...
post #105 of 801
The tree skiing IMO was by far the best......Fiddle OK..Superstar not so great

My Grades
1)Fiddle.......B-
2)Trees.......A-
3)Upper SS...C
4)Lower SS...C

Maybe it's the fall line but it seems to me you favor turning to the right... stronger more complete turns??
post #106 of 801
Quote:
Originally Posted by RicB View Post
On the fitness issue I wouldn't worry about strength increases, but I would suggest looking into a good mobility/stability program. Check the book "Athletic Body in Balance" by Grey Cook, published by Human Kinetics. You should find it online. Later, RicB.

P.S.here http://www.amazon.com/Athletic-Body-.../dp/0736042288
RicB, excellent recommendation…I just purchased. It appears pragmatic with direct applicability for skiing.
post #107 of 801
Quote:
Originally Posted by Highway Star View Post
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=g6na2MSWkSw

The icy and ungroomed side of superstar headwall, followed by carves on the deck.



I'm starting to think some of you guys wouldn't know good skiing if it came up behind you and ran you over.......
Huh. That was not what I expected. I gotta go with treewell on this.

BTW, I also have to go with Arnold Pants bigtime after finally watching this one: those skis are skiing you.

FWIW, your approach, style, and technique has a lot of similarity to what mine was in 2003, mostly as a result of learning to carve on straight skis. You can learn to work a lot less and get a lot more out of your skis if you want. But, it's all up to you.
post #108 of 801
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by bklyntrayc View Post


I'm surprised you still have your ACLs

Quote:
Originally Posted by X-EastCoaster View Post
Highway Star,

Why do you ask for MA and then poo poo everything anybody tries to tell you? Then you go back and forth with the "you don't know what you're talking about" / "I'm sorry I'll listen this time" thing. It's all very weird. If you just want people to watch and enjoy your skiing post it in the main forum - but since you posted it in the instruction forum this tells people you are looking to be critiqued - take like a man!

You ARE in the back seat and, especially in the first clip, it is hindering you. If I were helping you I would start with 2 simple tricks:

1. Your arms are way up and back - keep them more in front of you. If you want to turn left in that mangy snow, drive your right hand forward and a bit to the left. This will keep your weight where it needs to be and give you added leverage on the skis allowing easier, more powerful turning in crappy snow.

2. You are keeping your tips up by just sitting low and back. That's a fine start but you're not done - you want to get your feet more under you. One great trick to do this is to pull your toes up towards your shins. That pulls the tips up and actually has the effect of pulling the skis further back in relation to your body, effectively getting your center of mass more up toward the center of the ski. Watch Seth Morrison ski powder and you'll see it (that's where I got it from and it worked).

I realize the snow is WAY better here but I think you can see both things I'm talking about in this pick. Notice where my right arm is - much lower and more in front of my body than where you would have it. Notice how low I am - but yet I'm pulling my feet up and getting my feet under me and my weight centered over my skis.
The only time I have trouble taking people's advice is when it doesn't add up or make sense, or is given without taking into account enough information. I know the tip about leading with the outside hand, I've been doing that for over 10 years. The tip about the Toe pointing is new to me and I can see it being helpful, I'll try it out. Telling me that I'm in the back seat or massively out of shape is not helpful, because I'm not in that bad of shape and I obviously know what back seat skiing is. I'm skiing at a level high enough and in tricky enough snow and cover in that fiddle clip to where it really doesn't matter to me that I'm skiing backseat, especially when it's done intentionally, and I keep making good turns, even off the tails of the ski and muscling it.

There's a big difference between skiing technically well and skiing smart while skiing agressively. You can't ski smart if you restrict yourself to maintaining a single idealized perfect form and technique all the time, and you can't ski agressively without skiing smart (you will crash). What would have happen if I entered that snow with a nice centered stance? I would have done a face plant, or have been right on the verge of one if I got hung up, hit a rock, etc. I've skied alot of manky, thin cover snow to know better....there has to be a buffer left to allow for the unexpected.

If you watch the clip closely you can see me hunch forward right as I'm completing my first left turn through the deeper snow. This is a split second after the vidcap I posted, and right before first cap above. I am letting myself get forward to correct for the backseat of the last turn and test the snow, but I start to hang up and nearly go over the bars. bklyntrayc's 1st vidcap catches me mid-correction, where I am forcing my left foot forward and arms back, getting back into a stable position, which in this case is pretty back seat. It's hard to notice because I correct pretty quickly and blend the correction into the pole plant/setup for the next turn. But, I did come rather close to going over. The 2nd cap has me right in the middle of the turn initation, a split second after the pole plant with my right hand, but before my left hand comes strongly forward to lead the turn, a strong sweeping right hander off my tails.
post #109 of 801
Quote:
Originally Posted by Highway Star View Post
Ok, this is good, now we're getting somewhere...

...I want to be able put my inside ass cheek nearly on the snow, or be able to touch the snow with my hand, and have been able to do this on slightly steeper pitches. Subjectively, is this good technique? I think it's pretty similar to what I see out of most WC GS skiers......and if not, where am I falling short?

...
HS, I have a proposition for you.

You clearly aren't convinced that most of us in the peanut gallery here at Epic really have very much of an idea what we're talking about.

Now, it just happens that my business partner was a member of the US Ski Team through much of the 80's. He raced the World Cup as a downhill specialist but was also a very good slalom racer (good enough to have been the US Nationals Combined champion). In addition to that, he spent some time as the director and head coach of the Jackson Hole Ski Club, which is the junior race program here in JH (he provided the early foundation coaching for current US team member Resi Stiegler). Last but not least, he's a HIGHLY-requested coach in the annual race camps put on by the Jackson Hole Ski School.

I'm going on about his credentials in an effort to convince you that he MIGHT know what he's talking about when it comes to "advanced ski technique".

So here's my question:

Would you be interested in having him view your videos and give you feedback?

I haven't shown them to him yet. He's not a member of Epic and has never visited here as far as I know. He has no axe to grind in this debate and tends to be brutally honest (believe me, I know) with his assessments.

Would you like me to show him your videos and then post his impressions?
post #110 of 801
One thing you should try to learn is to not be soo defensive. You come off as kind of a ass. You ask for help and then you don't listen. I just had to say that after reading this whole thing. Ohh yeah, and you are in the backseat, big time.
post #111 of 801
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob Peters View Post
HS, I have a proposition for you.

You clearly aren't convinced that most of us in the peanut gallery here at Epic really have very much of an idea what we're talking about.

Now, it just happens that my business partner was a member of the US Ski Team through much of the 80's. He raced the World Cup as a downhill specialist but was also a very good slalom racer (good enough to have been the US Nationals Combined champion). In addition to that, he spent some time as the director and head coach of the Jackson Hole Ski Club, which is the junior race program here in JH (he provided the early foundation coaching for current US team member Resi Stiegler). Last but not least, he's a HIGHLY-requested coach in the annual race camps put on by the Jackson Hole Ski School.

I'm going on about his credentials in an effort to convince you that he MIGHT know what he's talking about when it comes to "advanced ski technique".

So here's my question:

Would you be interested in having him view your videos and give you feedback?

I haven't shown them to him yet. He's not a member of Epic and has never visited here as far as I know. He has no axe to grind in this debate and tends to be brutally honest (believe me, I know) with his assessments.

Would you like me to show him your videos and then post his impressions?
Be my guest, I'm sure it will be helpful. I've had a number of very good skiers, coaches, and industry people tell me my skiing is very good, but somewhat wild and unconventional.
post #112 of 801
Quote:
Originally Posted by Highway Star View Post
Be my guest, I'm sure it will be helpful. I've had a number of very good skiers, coaches, and industry people tell me my skiing is very good, but somewhat wild and unconventional.
Never mind.
post #113 of 801
In short turns, learn turn shape. You slap your skis from side to side. No arc shape at all. VERY obvious in the short turn portion of your SS clip.

Challenging crud-like conditions will expose this weakness.

Make C's. It has rhythm. It can be very dynamic. C's.

When you feel you're getting good at that, be sure to finish your linked short turns with parallel skis. Match your skis as you exit the fall line. This is not passive. It is strong, deliberate and accurate. It will help you complete your turns and put the finishing touch on your shaping.

The skidding stem you currently employ at turn completion will disappear.

There are ok C's, good C's and even exceptional C's. Awareness.

Submit a vid when you've got your short shapes figured out.
post #114 of 801

Troll?

Admit it dude, you are Iceman.

Seriously, someone just offered you a private video clinic with a World Cup caliber coach, and the best you can come up with is "By my guest." You've got to be a troll. That's just video you found on youtube, isn't it?

Oh, and I've got $20 that says the first thing that Bob's friend says is, "get the hell out of the backseat."
post #115 of 801
Quote:
Originally Posted by Arnold Pants View Post
Admit it dude, you are Iceman.

Seriously, someone just offered you a private video clinic with a World Cup caliber coach, and the best you can come up with is "By my guest." You've got to be a troll. That's just video you found on youtube, isn't it?

Oh, and I've got $20 that says the first thing that Bob's friend says is, "get the hell out of the backseat."
lol, that would be funny.
post #116 of 801
The real Highway Star would have deleted this thread before anyone had the chance to watch the video.
post #117 of 801
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Arnold Pants View Post
A vintage EpicSki threat in so many ways.

Okay, I'll bite, I can't resist.

HS you look exactly like me about 150 ski days ago. I now ski noticeable, though not tremendously better. So, I've lived through the improvement you are looking to make. Those are my qualifications to give you advice. And I am now going to repeat much of what has been said.

1. You are on waaaay too much ski. What do you weigh, 160? You just don't have enough combined mass, strength and technique to bend those things. Lose 10cm AT LEAST, better yet, 20. Get softer skis. It has nothing to do with what you "like" it is what you can ski.

2. You are balancing too far back relative to your feet. And I know why. Because of #1, the only way you can turn those things is to get back on them and pivot them around. Get shorter, softer skis, and you will find you can turn them properly, from a centered stance. You should be initiating your turns by driving the tips of the ski into the snow through pressure on your shins. You are not, you are initiating through pivoting your legs, and then once you have an edge set up, only then are you engaging anything resembling forward lean.

3. Relax. Your hands are waving all over, you are weighting and unweighting like a hyperactive 12 year old. Don't try so hard, as someone already said. And no, that's not freeskier vs. race coach. Racers have less upper body movement than you do and they are going 80mph on ice. Skiing those family friendly trails of yours, they would like like they were sitting in an easy chair.

In the vid through the trees, you look like a different person, a much better skier. I think that is because the soft snow neutralizes the issue with the skis, you don't need to bend them to make turns in that sweet sweet pow, and you are having a blast, and aren't thinking about, and thus overdoing, your technique.

4. Finish your turns. Let the skis come around more, so that can control your speed without skidding and you build up more torque, which will help you flow into the next turn.

4. How do you accomplish the above? Well, the first one requires $, but the other three? Drills and Blue Runs. Take a one hour private from a level III instructor, tell them you want 3 drills you can use on your own that will help with your basic technique flaws. Then do those for an hour every day you go skiing. Then go ski some blues for another hours, making relaxed, smooth turns that link from one to the next.

Good luck.
Arnold, excellent observations. The hand thing is spot on.....I've been told that since the mid 90's. Belive me, I do try to minimize it, but sometimes I like to move my arms around alot to make weight shifts during a turn. I know it's ugly, and I do work on it.

The tip pressure thing has nothing to do with those skis, it's how I'm chosing to ski them. The heads are sooooo much easier to ski on than the powder pluses I'm on in the clip you like. I've been given the impression (from numerous people) since the advent of sidecut skis that I should not be pressuring the tip or tail as much, so I moved away from that, and went to a rolled edging to start carved turns, or a pivot toi start short non carved turns. I also went to much softer boots in 2001, and I couldn't really load the tip, so my style moved way from that. I now have stiffer toungues and can load the front of the ski much better, so I will do that more since it's "ok" now...or even prefered. I can load a tip or tail pretty hard, it's really no problem.

There's no way in hell I'm getting shorter skis.....I have many skis that are much bigger and harder to ski than those heads. I had 175cm metron M:ex's last year and thought they sucked, sold them after 5 days. I think people look goofy when they are overpowering a ski, or are having to hold back to stay balanced on a shorter ski. I did just buy a 179cm Public Enemy, but that's for bumps and beating around on. In general, I'd rather be on something I can ride, like a 205 gs board....we're skiing here, not snowblading. He're what the quiver is looking like for this year:

186cm Head im88, zr18's - all around
190cm Big Daddies, fks 180's - pow
180cm Powder Plus - tight trees pow. (binding TBD)
192cm M777, S916, possibly with a vist plate. On-piste freeskiing. (yet to be purchased)
179cm Public Enemy, P18's? - bumps, packed trees, rock
195cm AK Launchers, 957C - touring

Plus a bunch of other stuff I really should sell off....
post #118 of 801
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bob Peters View Post
Never mind.
Please Bob, PLEASE!!!! I'M BEGGING YOU!!!!

Is that better?
post #119 of 801
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by whygimf View Post
In short turns, learn turn shape. You slap your skis from side to side. No arc shape at all. VERY obvious in the short turn portion of your SS clip.

Challenging crud-like conditions will expose this weakness.

Make C's. It has rhythm. It can be very dynamic. C's.

When you feel you're getting good at that, be sure to finish your linked short turns with parallel skis. Match your skis as you exit the fall line. This is not passive. It is strong, deliberate and accurate. It will help you complete your turns and put the finishing touch on your shaping.

The skidding stem you currently employ at turn completion will disappear.

There are ok C's, good C's and even exceptional C's. Awareness.

Submit a vid when you've got your short shapes figured out.
Thanks....but I'm not going to be making a short carved turn on a 22m sidecut ski, especially on steep inconsistant ice. I'm not trying to arc them. As far as I can tell, my skis are largely parallel. I lift my inside ski as I initiate a pivoted/scarved short turn, not quite sure why, but I don't see an issue with that. I don't think we're really on the same page here, but thanks anyway.
post #120 of 801
Quote:
Originally Posted by Highway Star View Post
Please Bob, PLEASE!!!! I'M BEGGING YOU!!!!

Is that better?
opportunity knocked. maybe you shoulda got off the can and opened the door?
if someone like bob, whom i've seen ski (thus this comment), offered me some advice, i'd ask if i could get my tape recorder first. that you dismiss the possibility of getting some help from a former world cupper is indicative of someone who might be asking for advice...rhetorically.

the only thing stopping you from improving your skiing is you.

in the meantime, keep "rippin'."
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EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › Ski Training and Pro Forums › Ski Instruction & Coaching › Can I get some MA my epicski brothers!!! (video of Highway Star)