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Sports you can do like the Pros... - Page 2

post #31 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by memosteve View Post
I'm sorry, but it takes about a two year waiting list to get a tee time at St. Andrews and cost about $1500+, not including caddy fees, to play the old course.
chuckle. Not always! I've only ever played golf once, and guess where it was?! Didn't wait at all, and it cost some beer at Ma Belle's afterwards.
post #32 of 51
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by ant View Post
chuckle. Not always! I've only ever played golf once, and guess where it was?! Didn't wait at all, and it cost some beer at Ma Belle's afterwards.

Caddy charge is £40 (less if you go for a trainee) - that's about $75US
post #33 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wear The Fox Hat View Post
That's only if you're not a local. It is a municipal course. If you live in St Andrews, annual membership is less than $1500!
I'm hanging with you when I get to go over there then.

When you consider the fees (the $1500 I mentioned), it's not just the actual green fee, but the agent fee, caddy fee, etc...Then there's the airfare, hotel, food and so on. For an American to go over there and play, it's easily a $2000-3000 proposition. Don't forget that the tee times are usually booked a year in advance, which is why you have to pay an agent to get you a tee time.

St. Andrews is most definetely on my list to do (up there w/heli skiing Alaska) before I grow to old, but I don't think 99% of amateur golfers, at least from America, will ever be able to do it.

The same is true for some famous courses here in the states (Pebble Beach, Trump National, and others). There's even courses that are household names for golfers that you can just forget about playing (Augusta National for instance).

It's not that you can't. It's that it's out of reach for the masses and still reserved, for the most part, for the elite of society.
post #34 of 51
Thread Starter 
What do you need an agent for - you can book it online!

1 March 2007 - 27 March 2007 (with mats): £59
28 March 2007 - 15 April 2007: £84
16 April - 14 October 2007: £125
15 - 31 October 2007: £88
1 November 2007 - 29 February 2008 (with mats): £61
Caddie: £40
Trainee Caddie: £25
post #35 of 51
Well if your information is correct, then there's a serious lie being perpetuated by publications such as Golf Digest to us here in the states.
post #36 of 51
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by memosteve View Post
Well if your information is correct, then there's a serious lie being perpetuated by publications such as Golf Digest to us here in the states.
Well, I hope the info is correct - cause it's straight off the St Andrews website...
http://www.standrews.org.uk/golf/boo...ees_07-08.html

(as a rough guide, to convert the figures to dollars, multiply by 1.9)
post #37 of 51
I call flawed! It depends on what you mean by doing it like the pros. The answer would be virtually all or virtually none.

I think surfing may come close, but skiing on the same venue as Bode? While you could ski Pirds of Prey, unless you're skiing it race prepped with gates, it's not even close. And the skis your on are not Bode's stock, and you're nowhere near his spped. Golf?? Not gonna happen unless you are invited to a ProAm. Ever played on a tournament prepped course from the tournament tees? Some of the MikeWil probably has, and could probably tell you that it's nothing like the local Muni course. I live very close to Avenel, where they hold a PGA event, but the course is only set up that difficult for one week a year, and you're not allowed on it (BTW, the head turf guy for Avenel was (is?) a ski instructor at Whitetail). Avenel is even a semi public course, if you have the $250/round.

Race cars? Not too many people getting in a real pro race car. But there are enough levels of auto racing that you might be able to come close, although still not at the elite pro level.

Billiards? Darts? Sure.

Bicycling? MTB, yeah, but road racing? I guess it's possible, but I don't know or even know of anyone who has ridden 20 centuries in 22 days across the Alps on a 14 lb race machine with a support crew on closed roads. Doesn't happen. Not that it couldn't, though (except for the closed road part)

Team sports like football, baseball, hockey, b-ball, etc. NO. Not even in fantasy camp.

Tennis. Yeah, you can buy the racquet and play on a legit court, easy. But returning a 120mph serve isn't going to happen unless you're close to pro level, much less trading topspin ground strokes.

Sailing? Powerboats? Sure, if you got the bucks. There is even some good pro sailing on only moderately expensive boats (well under $100k) Windsurfing would also be very doable within a reasonable budget.

Pro computer gaming is in reach for anyone!!!! Oh, sorry, you wanted sports. I guess that rules out billiars and darts, too.
post #38 of 51
Inline speed skating
Rodeo kayak
post #39 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by JohnH View Post
Bicycling? MTB, yeah, but road racing? I guess it's possible, but I don't know or even know of anyone who has ridden 20 centuries in 22 days across the Alps on a 14 lb race machine with a support crew on closed roads. Doesn't happen. Not that it couldn't, though (except for the closed road part)
.
Our own PPTC A-ride leader Alberto Morales:
http://tdfc2006.blogspot.com/
post #40 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by comprex View Post
Our own PPTC A-ride leader Alberto Morales:
http://tdfc2006.blogspot.com/
Like all of the other activities... if you've got the time and money.....

I don't know Alberto, but if he's from reston, and I work within walking distance of Reston Town Center, I'd have to say he's local.

What's the PPTC? Is that Potomac Pedalers? I would have thought, that being from reston, he'd be in with the Reston Bike Club.

BTW, I never realized you're local too. Do I know you in real life? Will you be at Whitetail on Nov 11?
post #41 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by JohnH View Post
BTW, I never realized you're local too. Do I know you in real life?
Err, don't think so yet.

Quote:
Will you be at Whitetail on Nov 11?
Current plans are for WVa that weekend.
post #42 of 51
I know someone who has ridden the famous climbs of the Giro d'Italia on a real Tour bike. Solo.
post #43 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by JohnH View Post
I call flawed! It depends on what you mean by doing it like the pros. The answer would be virtually all or virtually none.

Golf?? Not gonna happen unless you are invited to a ProAm. Ever played on a tournament prepped course from the tournament tees? Some of the MikeWil probably has, and could probably tell you that it's nothing like the local Muni course. I live very close to Avenel, where they hold a PGA event, but the course is only set up that difficult for one week a year, and you're not allowed on it

Even in a ProAm the amateurs generally play from a forward set of tees while the pro plays from the normal tournament tees. And as the tournament progress the course will generally play more difficult each day; rough gets longer, greens get firmer etc. The average player (or skier) generally has no concept how good the elite professionals really are or how hard those course setups make play.

A few weeks ago I had an interesting reality check that may exemplify that point. An older gentleman joined my threesome playing the championship tees on one of our rotations which slopes around 148-way, way more difficult than the average course. He proceeds to blow a beautiful, long drive way past all of us and as the round progresses demonstrates an incredible long and short game threatening the course record until a few missed putts late in the round. During the course of the round we find out Bob used to be a conditional exempt player on the Champions (PGA Senior) Tour (meaning he got in to tournament when there weren't enough exempt players to fill the field). He was playing his first round in a year coming back from shoulder surgery on one of the most difficult tracks in Colorado. It is more than a slogan "These guys are good"!!! I think he stands 300th on their career money list if I remember what I looked up correctly.

We are all just posers folks!!!
post #44 of 51
- whitewater kayaking
post #45 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by mikewil View Post
Even in a ProAm the amateurs generally play from a forward set of tees while the pro plays from the normal tournament tees. And as the tournament progress the course will generally play more difficult each day; rough gets longer, greens get firmer etc. The average player (or skier) generally has no concept how good the elite professionals really are or how hard those course setups make play.

A few weeks ago I had an interesting reality check that may exemplify that point. An older gentleman joined my threesome playing the championship tees on one of our rotations which slopes around 148-way, way more difficult than the average course. He proceeds to blow a beautiful, long drive way past all of us and as the round progresses demonstrates an incredible long and short game threatening the course record until a few missed putts late in the round. During the course of the round we find out Bob used to be a conditional exempt player on the Champions (PGA Senior) Tour (meaning he got in to tournament when there weren't enough exempt players to fill the field). He was playing his first round in a year coming back from shoulder surgery on one of the most difficult tracks in Colorado. It is more than a slogan "These guys are good"!!! I think he stands 300th on their career money list if I remember what I looked up correctly.

We are all just posers folks!!!
I played Mccormick Ranch golf course in Scottsdale, Az last year when the Greygoose/Gateway tour was there...My tee time was the very first one after the last group on the last day and I did play from the back tees. I'm sure this is the closest I've been to playing on a pro level prepped course.

I did manage to break 90 (86 the first 18 and 82 the next morning), and I'm a single digit, so ya, it's much harder.
post #46 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rick View Post
- whitewater kayaking


I was going to suggest that but then thought about the courses they have and wondered if you can run say the one for the olypics or world champs.... and i had no idea...
post #47 of 51

Running/golf/cycling/skiing

Yeah, there aren't many arenas where "normal" folk can compete on even footing. I'd agree that tris allow amateurs to do the "same" thing on same/similar equipment, just slower. Just for fun, here are some personal examples from my limited athletic experience:

Running: Only two women in history (Flo-Jo & Marion Jones) have ever run 100 meters faster than me (10.7 seconds), so I'd have been a world class woman athlete. Oh, and no P.E. drugs either! Of course, I'm a guy, so I'd have lost to to any world class male sprinter by .5-.9 seconds (5-10 meters) on my best day. I dunno if that's close enough (some of the guys who finish last in WC sprints run like 10.6s, but don't run that slow consistently)...

Golf: I've played some shots as well as pros, but an amateur can't play a round like them. For instance, I've hit some individual shots at Harding Park (SF, CA) or La Costa (Carlsbad, CA) from the same spots on the fairway as the pros and had better results. That being said, if you gave a handicap to a middling pro, I'd bet it would be about -5. Mine's about +17. Those guys are SO good.

Cycling - We can spend $8K & get the 14.5 lb. bike, and ride the same course (Alpe d'Huez (TdF), Passo Stelvio (Giro d'Italia), Big Sur (Tour of California), etc.). However, amateurs go at about 1/2-2/3 speed, i.e. climb at 9 mph v. 16 mph. And the pros, with their PEDs can go for days...

Skiing? I got cliffed out once & had to straightline a chute at Blackcomb. (laughs) Does that count as "extreme?" (y'right) Other than cliff jumping (does that count as skiing?, which is another topic) there's little opportunity for an amateur to ski anything like a WC skier (alpine, moguls, freestyle, whatever) or on a similar course.
post #48 of 51
I raced mountain bike (sport vet) on the same course at the same time as the Pros at a Hunter Mountain World Cup cross country race. Rishi Grewal growled at me and I jumped out of his way. I was careful not to get in the way of his pursuers. I followed a pace line of pros on a dirt road (including Overend and Djenis). I didn't try to draft, figuring I had interfered enough. I kept up though, until the road turned sharply uphill. They kept going the same speed while I dropped down to a smaller chainring, and a big cog.

I think that was the last time amateurs were allowed to compete at World Cups but it isn't solely my fault. (I wasn't the only one who got lapped).
post #49 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by disski View Post


I was going to suggest that but then thought about the courses they have and wondered if you can run say the one for the olypics or world champs.... and i had no idea...
I originally put 'rodeo' because you sort of have to be a member of BCE to get access to Dickerson:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fQFtOltAiho
post #50 of 51
Aggressive inline, skateboarding, and bmx. You can go to the same skate parks as all the pros.
post #51 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wear The Fox Hat View Post
Caddy charge is £40 (less if you go for a trainee) - that's about $75US
I don't think we had a caddy. We were guests of the uni. Might have had a caddy, dunno. Beers afterwards at ma belle's were on us though. So if there was a caddy, he got beer too.
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