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Good book for advanced intermediate?

post #1 of 14
Thread Starter 
I'm probably in the same boat as a lot of people. I've taken a no. of lessons over the years and usually feel if I get one or two tips, it was worth it. I'm very comfortable on blues and most blacks. Not great in moguls, but I'm in my 50's so I'm not sure that's much of an aspiration at this point. The 2 main things I'd like to get better at are 1. carving-especially steeper slopes 2. off piste. I've searched a bit on the forum and see that there may be some contoversy w/re to teaching styles. I'm looking for a good book and perhaps accompanying DVD to help with above. Thanks for suggestions.
post #2 of 14
post #3 of 14
You've got the suggestion from Max_501. I would suggest a trip to one of the ESA events. If that doesn't work, I would suggest spending some time on EpicSki, especially looking at various threads in this forum like the Perfect Turn (post #19, especially) and Those Turns Illustrated.

There's a lot here.

If you want a book, try R. Mark Elling's The All-mountain Skier. You might also like Eric and Rob DesLauriers' book Ski the Whole Mountain.
post #4 of 14

I second Max

You sound very much like I would have described myself several years ago (including the 50's part), except I wouldn't say I usually got worthwhile tips from lessons.

The "Anyone Can be an Expert Skier 1" book turned my ski life around, and for a lot less money than even a single lesson. You don't necessarily have to do all of the beginning lessons, but you should certainly read it cover to cover.

I know it's a contentious subject over here, but I heartily second Max's suggeston (and I'm not a racer or instructor, just a 'terminal intermediate' who couldn't find a cost effective way to get better).
post #5 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by Maui Steve View Post
I'm probably in the same boat as a lot of people. I've taken a no. of lessons over the years and usually feel if I get one or two tips, it was worth it. I'm very comfortable on blues and most blacks. Not great in moguls, but I'm in my 50's so I'm not sure that's much of an aspiration at this point. The 2 main things I'd like to get better at are 1. carving-especially steeper slopes 2. off piste. I've searched a bit on the forum and see that there may be some contoversy w/re to teaching styles. I'm looking for a good book and perhaps accompanying DVD to help with above. Thanks for suggestions.
You may like to consider a midfat ski eg Volkl AC4 to asist skill development in steep off piste conditions. I own a pair myself
and am 48. In case you didnt know, the skis you are on can
quiet often serve the role of instructor in that they will throw
you off balance if you are not skiing them right. Best to practise
finding the point of balance on an easy groomed run.
post #6 of 14
This was discussed a bit in the following threads:
http://forums.epicski.com/showthread.php?t=35465
http://forums.epicski.com/showthread.php?t=18443

I just did a quick search of the forums. Here are some links:

Dan Diprio's mogul book:
http://forums.epicski.com/showthread.php?t=39753

Weems' Book:
http://www.edgechange.com/

Ellen Post Foster - Skiing and the Art of Carving (Book and video)
http://tpsf.org/skierorder.html

Hopes this helps a bit.
post #7 of 14
Note that the Anyone Can Be an Expert Skier series is the PMTS method, which is perfectly valid and works well, but is very different from the way that most schools and the PSIA teaches. I read and watched a couple of them a couple of years ago and liked them, but have returned to the mainstream approach.

I suggest The Skier's Edge by Ron Lemaster to get a great understanding of how skiing works.

Brilliant Skiing by Weems for a fantastic overall approach to skiing.

The All Mountain Skier for good technique and exercises.


If I was to buy just one probably Lemaster, maybe Brilliant Skiing.
post #8 of 14
Read this:

Your skis sides are cut so that they have a more or less hour glass shape. When you roll your skis onto one of their edges, the ski will bend into an arc due to your weight on them and press the edge into the snow. Try it with a model, a piece of paper cut like so )(. Tip the paper against the floor and make the edge touch the floor; it bends into a curve. As the skis move forward on their edge the carve a turn. The bigger the tipping angle the bigger the turn.

Skis made for learners can't handle typical carving speeds on steeps. If you have such skis, ski slowly, end your turns pointing slightly uphill on blues to slow you down. Get some skis rated to perform at high speeds before you try carving blacks.

Now skip all the other reading and scroll down to the bottom of this page and look at these pics:
http://www.youcanski.com/en/instruction/carving.htm
Right turn, straight, left turn.
post #9 of 14
Since you asked about books:
A great book to also consider is Mark Elling's "The All Mountain Skier: The Way to Expert Skiing". You should be able to find it at either Borders or Barnes & Noble. It breaks out skiing into various components such as carving, moguls, powder etc. and has a "tool box" approach to working on technique. It also covers gear.

The problem with books is that while they can be an interesting read, books don't really work that well for a lot of people. You can read how to do something correctly but you often can't actually see yourself doing it. On the slopes the difference between what you think you are doing and what you are actually doing can be dramatic. That is where an expert instructor/coach can make all the difference.

I would really think about doing a multi day clinic like Epic Ski Academy, if you can. Small groups, expert instructors and the multi-day approach is the best way to significantly improve for many, in IMHO.

Skiing in many ways is counter-intuitive. There are some activities like in-line skating, soccer or ice hockey that correlate well with skiing but most activities do not. This means a lot of new muscle memory learning needs to take place. The multi-day clinic approach can be very valuable in this regard.

The big problem with self-taught skiing is that you can get good at doing the wrong things well. This will soon limit your progress- a lot of what the so called intermediate rut is about. If you are one who can read and then execute great. However, when it comes to skiing, many if not most probably don't fall into that group.

Good luck.

PS. I've attended two ESA's as well as having read a lot of books.
post #10 of 14
Maui Steve,

How often do you ski each year? How many days in a row do you ski for? Who do you ski with? These are questions that have direct effect on your ability to improve in the direction you wish. The best way to improve is to ski midweek when the slopes are not crowded or lift lines long. This is also the best time to take lessons b/c the classes are smaller than weekends and you get the full time instructor staff. Ski with someone more skilled than you when you free ski. These are things that no book will give you.

If you find an instructor that meets your needs, ask for the instructor again so you have continuity in your instruction. Also, when buying your lesson, let the staff know your needs for the lesson.

I know skiers that ski only a few times a year that are great skiers and I know skiers that ski every day with a trainer and never seem to improve.

I feel you need a plan to improve in the direction you want that allows for reading, quality instruction, quality practice, multi-day ski time on uncrowded slopes, and someone to ski with that is more experienced in bumps and trees (off piste).

Good luck!

RW
post #11 of 14
One of the biggest challenges with learning to ski from a book is this question: "Are you doing what you think you are doing?" We have discussed this at some length here at EpicSki, including in this thread that I started last year about perception versus reality.

Even those who are "good skiers" don't necessarily know what they are seeing and why one person is skiing well and another isn't. I'd second the ESA recommendation, and even suggest that you might find one of the EpicSki Instructors that you "meet" here on the forum and see if they are appropriate to help you take a few steps in the right direction.

Because of the perception issue, you want to be able to really trust your instructor/coach. It doesn't help to have someone tell you that you ski "better than 97% of all the skiers on the mountain" if all that means is that you aren't the typical one week a year skier. It's much more effective to know where you are, where you are going, and how to get there.
post #12 of 14
Three books that I've read, purporting to be the kind of thing you might want to pick up:

Ski the Whole Mountain (by Eric & Rob Deslauriers)
Anyone can be an expert skier (by Harald Harb)
The Skier's Edge (by Ron LeMaster)

Of the three, I found LeMaster's to be the most understandable. The Harb book left me confused, but realising that the title is not the truth. The Deslauriers book was good, and has some great photo sequences in it, which makes it a good summer read. (I bought my copy of Ski the Whole Mountain from Eric, who signed the copy for me when he was instructing at an ESA)
post #13 of 14

Amen to The Skier's Edge...

...Ron LeMaster is a local, and we're lucky enough to have him make a yearly presentation to the CU Team, local Masters, and interested junior racers. When Ron isn't traveling with the U. S. Team (he does video analysis for them), he'll stop by our training sessions, and he always has some good stuff for us to work on...
post #14 of 14
Ron will be offering a public talk on November 6th. I'll be posting details as it gets a bit closer.
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