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K2 Lotta Luv at Tremblant

post #1 of 15
Thread Starter 
Does the K2 Lotta Luv have enough grip to hold to hold the hard snow/ice at Tremblant? I'm an expert, 5"6, 125 pounds, looking for an all-mountain that handles the hard snow at Tremblant but since I usually spend half my day in the bumps can have fun in that too.

Any other suggestions?

Thanks!
post #2 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by TremblantChick View Post
Does the K2 Lotta Luv have enough grip to hold to hold the hard snow/ice at Tremblant? I'm an expert, 5"6, 125 pounds, looking for an all-mountain that handles the hard snow at Tremblant but since I usually spend half my day in the bumps can have fun in that too.

Any other suggestions?

Thanks!
I have skied Tremblant on a cold icy day in January. I would have to say that the Recon would not have been my ski of choice for that day and I think that you could find a better stick than the Lotta.

You say all mountain, but do you really need a wide (ish) ski? If so, fine, there are some good ones like the Attiva AC-3 from Volkl or the Nordica Victory that will shine on the shiney snow.

If you really don't need the width (for deeper snow) you can get a better mix of grip and quickness from say a Volkl Attiva 4 star or a Nordica Olympia speed.

You could possibly also consider a unisex ski for an advanced skier such as the Nordica SUV-12 this will have tons of grip for the hard stuff. Check out this review on the '06 SUV 12.1.

http://shop.sierrasnowboard.com/browse.cfm/4,931.htm

SJ
post #3 of 15
Thread Starter 
Thanks SierraJim!

The Nordica SUV 12.1 looks interesting, I hadn't heard of them before. How are the Olympia Speed vs. Victory in the bumps?

Lots more questions and would really appreciate any advice:

I'm not surprised that the Lotta Luv's would be too wide for Tremblant but someone else had recommended them to me and I needed another opinion. What about the Burning or One Luv's? Would they hold better on ice? My old skis are K2 Merlin IV's which handled everything great but it's time to retire them...

Would the Volkl Supersport 4 star be equivalent to the Attiva 4 star? How would the Supersport 4* be on ice and in the bumps? Been offered a pretty good deal on last year's model.

I don't see Salomon's mentioned to often on this board. Any thoughts on the Speed Racer 8 or Siam N10?

Cheers!
post #4 of 15
I am a firm believer that a ski that’s much fatter than 70mm underfoot is not the best everyday all-mountain ski for the East. I know, you’ll hear lots of people say otherwise, but usually it’s from people who don’t ski in the East (or perhaps guys who don’t know any better or think they have something to prove ). What most skiers out West consider to be firm or icy snow is practically a powder day for the East Coast. Seriously, we WISH their firm/icy snow was the worst we’d ever get here.

I have three skis: a Salomon unisex race ski that’s 62mm underfoot, the Salomon Scream W8 with 76mm underfoot (I believe this is the precursor to the Siam), and the K2 Phat Luv with 90mm underfoot (new Phat Luv is 95mm). Jay Peak is my home mountain, but I do my fair share of skiing at other Eastern resorts, including Tremblant. The woman’s Salomon Scream is very close to the Lotta Luv (which is 78mm underfoot). In fact, I think it’s got a better hold on the firmer/icier conditions than the Lotta Luv. I spent several days this past season trying out the Scream on both firm snow and just plain ice, and every time, I eventually switched to my race skis because they had far better grip. Yes, I COULD ski all day on the Scream, I am skilled enough to do that (I’ve even skied all day on ice on my Phat Luvs—the powder day that wasn’t), but why do that when it is not the best ski for those conditions? It was much more work to get them up on edge, while my race skis were like being on rails. Which means it was much more fun on the race skis.

Also, you say you spend half the time in the bumps. A ski that’s around 70mm is much quicker and snappier than the fatter Lotta Luv. Personally I like the Burnin Luv for the kind of conditions we have here. It’s great on ice and firm snow, is quick in the bumps, but also has enough float on a powder day (yes, I’ve skied it in more than 2 feet of freshies and had a blast!). My husband is a patroller and most of the patrollers say that if they had only one ski, it would be around 70mm (men and women seem to agree on this point).

My advice: Demo. This is the kind of thing you really need to experience for yourself. Who knows, you might decide you think the Lotta Luv is “it.” Or you might decide on a ski that you previously wouldn’t have even considered. I do suggest you test ski brands that have better reputations as “ice skis” than the K2—such as Volkl, Atomic and Fischer—especially if you do want to go fatter.

All that said, I admit that I spend most of my days on my Screams, but Jay does get considerably more snow than other Eastern resorts (Stowe comes close, but the others lag pretty far behind in that regard), plus it gets a lot less traffic to ski it off. I also spend about 90 percent of my time in the trees. If I lived out West, my all-mountain ski would be something like the Lotta Luv or the Scream. I wouldn’t even consider a “skinnier” ski because I wouldn’t need it. But since I live here, my next purchase of an all-mountain ski will not be wider than 70mm underfoot (72mm would be the fattest I’d go and I think that might be pushing it). It’s time to replace the race ski soon, and the Burnin Luv is on the top of my list for that (but I’m always demoing to see if that impression changes).

I hope that helps some.

Thatsagirl
post #5 of 15
My wife loves her Lotta Luv's, but has R11's for the hard days.
post #6 of 15
Thread Starter 
Thanks for the great advice Thatsagirl! It's so nice to hear from fellow east coasters who know our ski dilema's and various ski conditions ;-)

I'm definitely intrigued by the Burnin Luv and a shop in Tremblant has one from last year in my size I think I'll go check it out. The shop also mentioned the Rossignol S9 Oversize, isn't that more of a race ski? I trust the guy there and he said it was great in the bumps too but after a quick google it seems to be in the race category. Any thoughts?
post #7 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by Thatsagirl View Post
I am a firm believer that a ski that’s much fatter than 70mm underfoot is not the best everyday all-mountain ski for the East. I know, you’ll hear lots of people say otherwise, but usually it’s from people who don’t ski in the East (or perhaps guys who don’t know any better or think they have something to prove ). I hope that helps some.

Thatsagirl
Ouch. I resemble that remark. My narrowest ski is 76 in the waist and I love it, maybe I just don't know better or have something to prove .

The Lotta Luv, a womans version of the Recon is a pretty beefy ski and I think it will be a strong east coast ski for a strong east coast woman skier (maybe thats not you, touche ). I will say a 78 is on the wider side for a ski, especially when you are getting into the shorter lengths and a low to mid 70's will also suffice, provided the ski is strong enough torsonally to hold an edge.
post #8 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by TremblantChick View Post
Thanks SierraJim!

The Nordica SUV 12.1 looks interesting, I hadn't heard of them before. How are the Olympia Speed vs. Victory in the bumps?

Lots more questions and would really appreciate any advice:

I'm not surprised that the Lotta Luv's would be too wide for Tremblant but someone else had recommended them to me and I needed another opinion. What about the Burning or One Luv's? Would they hold better on ice? My old skis are K2 Merlin IV's which handled everything great but it's time to retire them...

Would the Volkl Supersport 4 star be equivalent to the Attiva 4 star? How would the Supersport 4* be on ice and in the bumps? Been offered a pretty good deal on last year's model.

I don't see Salomon's mentioned to often on this board. Any thoughts on the Speed Racer 8 or Siam N10?

Cheers!
TC:

OY.......................!!....................... :

OK one at a time..............................

Generally, K2's do not shine on real hard snow. I lived in Stowe for 4 seasons and during that time, K2's were simply not my ski of choice when it is scratchy. OTH, for conditions that are merely firm, they are great and I will say that the Burnin' is the best of the K2's.

Nordica has been quietly building some of the best skis on the market for a couple of years now. The Victory is wider but a touch softer than the Speed. The Speed has more grip and is built on the SUV 12.1 chassis with a forward mount and slightly softer flex.

The Volkl 4* has the same shape as the Attiva 4 star but is stiffer and heavier. The 4* might be a little stiff for bumps but the Attivas would not.

Salomon deserves more respect than they often get. The Siam 10 is a very good ski but is wider than necessary for what you want. Still, it's not a bad choice. By Speed Racer, I think you mean Street Racer. That model came in several shapes. Some SR's had very exaggerated shapes and were nice carvers but had a little too much shape for bumps.

This link will show you the Top Streetracer-W that has a moderate shape.

http://shop.sierrasnowboard.com/browse.cfm/4,1734.htm

This shows the Fischer unisex RX-6 which is also very good on hard snow and a great buy @ $329 w/bindings.

http://shop.sierrasnowboard.com/browse.cfm/4,1047.htm

SJ
post #9 of 15
I have not skied in the east so take this for what it is worth. I demo'd quite a few skis last year and at the end of the year I was ready to buy the Lotta Luv's. A friend convinced me to try the Nordica Olympia Victorys and they felt much more solid and grippy as compared to the Lottas and they carve much better. I skied the Victory's in powder, crud, on the groomers and soft, slushy spring snow at Loveland and Breck and they were great in all of those conditions.

I am 5'8, 138 lbs and probably high intermediate/low advanced skier.
post #10 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by Phil Pugliese View Post
Ouch. I resemble that remark. My narrowest ski is 76 in the waist and I love it, maybe I just don't know better or have something to prove .

The Lotta Luv, a womans version of the Recon is a pretty beefy ski and I think it will be a strong east coast ski for a strong east coast woman skier (maybe thats not you, touche ). I will say a 78 is on the wider side for a ski, especially when you are getting into the shorter lengths and a low to mid 70's will also suffice, provided the ski is strong enough torsonally to hold an edge.
Phil, I knew that would draw you out. Now I'm waiting for Alfonse to join the fray. Notice I DID say that I usually use my 76mm ski, the Scream W8 (yep, a ladies' ski, Phil, so I am probably not a very strong skier ). But it is not what I prefer in icy conditions. If I were to only have one ski, I would like it to be a bit narrower underfoot. And narrower skis respond better, USUALLY, in bumps.

Guys seem to buy into the marketing hype of "fatter is better" more than women. I think that's the common sense in us. However, as usual, SierraJim knows what he's talking about...

By the way, Phil, why don't you tell TremblantChick just how many skis YOU own...sounds like you can't figure out exactly which ski is good for you and just buy because they are the "it" item of the moment.

Thatsagirl
post #11 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by Thatsagirl View Post
By the way, Phil, why don't you tell TremblantChick just how many skis YOU own...sounds like you can't figure out exactly which ski is good for you and just buy because they are the "it" item of the moment.

Thatsagirl
[Thread drift on] The amount of skis I "may own" is irrelivent . [/Thread drift off]

I do find that "mid 70's" waised ski to go through the late day skied out/piled up/skied off snow great, much better than a upper 60's waisted or even low 70's waised ski. I also don't feel like I sacrifice any edge to edge quickness in the bumps either.
When I first saw the Lotta Luv in the catalog, I thought it was jsut a wider version of the One/Burnin type ski, but when I saw it in a store and fondled it (yes I fondle skis and am proud to say it), it felt burlier than the BL much more like a Recon. I am not sure it is a "one ski quiver" ski, but it felt like a player. Another ski that should be considered is the Volkl AC3 Attiva, that looks like another serious womans ski with a 74mm waist.
post #12 of 15
If there were any doubt that a girl can hold her own, on GIRL skis, there isn't now!

This one is worth the price of admission.
Wait while I get my popcorn!

post #13 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by Thatsagirl View Post
Guys seem to buy into the marketing hype of "fatter is better" more than women.
Oh I dunno about that. Most women I know like it to be a little "fatter", too. The girthier the ski the wider the track!

Right Phil?
post #14 of 15
It's interesting, Evilanche, how you were able to kill a perfectly valid...and lively...debate with that comment. :

I do hope that others will chime in with their recommendations for TremblantChick. There is no right or wrong answer here, just lots to consider. And, of course, demo!

Thatsagirl
post #15 of 15
Thread Starter 
Lots of great responses over the weekend, Thanks to all! On the weekend I was offered a new pair of Atomic B11, new but from the 2004-2005 season for only $350 Canadian. I'm really unfamiliar with this model but it seems to be know as the Metron B11 now, has there been a lot of changes to it over the past couple of years? Am I better off with newer technology? I think I'm still leaning towards the Burnin Luv's...
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