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Chiropractors - Legit or Not?

post #1 of 46
Thread Starter 
I'm hoping someone here can shed some light on this topic. First, a little background: I'm 27, 5'10" and weigh about 165lbs. I consider myself to be in excellent shape - I ski and snowboard almost 70 days a year, mountain bike, road bike, golf, rock climb, play pickup basketball, etc.

Every ski season, right around day 10 or so of Christmas break (I've been taking a two week vacation around the holiday for as long as I can remember) I end up with this incredible pain in my right hip. It feels like someone has a steak knife shoved right inside the joint. This only occurs after prolonged periods (10 minutes +) of inactivity. After "walking it off" for a minute or two, the pain subsides to a tolerable level.

A fellow instructor who is also a physical therapist has told me that my spine is out of alignment from years of physical "abuse." I realize this isn't a medical forum, but could that be the issue? At first I thought it was bursitis, but apparently I'm too young and healthy (never injured my hip that I know of) for that condition. If my spine is, in fact, out of wack, is that something a Chiropractor can take care of without exacerbating the condition?

One more thing: When I go to sleep at night, I generally sleep in the fetal position. After a few minutes in that position, if I take a deep breath my spin "pops"...someone mind explaining that one, too?!
post #2 of 46
I think this was discussed here before, if I am not mistaken. My opinion (as a physician) is that chiropracters can sometimes be very helpful--- BUT the problem is the theory behind their practice is complete quackery and pseudoscience. To me, I would suspect that your problem has nothing whatsoever to do with some kind of spinal misalignment and more likely a tendonitis, but I am not an orthopedist or physiatrist. I would see a competent sports medicine specialist (if you are near New Haven, I am sure that there must be one at Yale). Treatment may perhaps involve manipulative or physical therapy, but you should do it because there is a rational scientific reason to do so. Remember, if all you have is a hammer, everything looks like a nail- if you go to a chiropracter they are certain to recommend chiropractic manipulation for your "spinal misalignment"!
post #3 of 46
I fractured my Spine 20 years ago in a car accident. I have been in Chiropractic for the last 19 years. It makes a huge difference.

On my first visit to the Chiropractor I reviewed my X-Rays and was able to note some serious mis-alignment and the fracture myself....as a lay person. Following the adjustment we X-rayed again and things appeared straight as an arrow.

dp.....I have to respectfully disagree with you that their practice is complete quackery and pseudoscience. In fact in the last few years I understand many "traditional" medical facilities are coming to accept it. It's really quite simple. If misaligned vertibrae squeeze/press/crush the nerves that leave the spinal column that head to other parts of the body the result is pain. I used to get "phantom" knee pain (fractured L-3) that would completely disappear following an adjustment.

dp ....Now....as you know....I'm a builder.....I have hammers (12oz-16lbs) and nails look like nails....but there are also screws, lag bolts, brads, finish nails, framing nails, flooring nails etc etc. You simply need to match the right tool to the right nail/or other thing that connects something noted above.

There are many folks that post here that has seen the results of a spinal manipulation on me for the migrains and other pain I get. It works if you need it. I have a Chiropractor here at home...and one I see when I'm out west.

Skitoofast....Understand that Chiropractic is not designed to "cure", though in some cases people can be realigned and stay properly aligned. Think of it more as maintanence. Just like a car. If you aligned it every week your tires would wear pretty straight and last longer.

Go see a doctor as dp suggested and see what they say. Go see a Chriopractor and see what they do. If the doctor reccomends pills/pain killers to mask the pain...turn and run (if you still can). If the Chriopractor "re-aligns" you and it works...stick with it.

Good luck.
post #4 of 46
Whn I bend either thumb sharply, they pop, but I don't think they're out of alignment.:

Google the studies, there's placebo effect to cracking your back, nothing more, though in some cases I'm sure it feels good just like cracking your knuckles. The other stuff a chiropractor might do -- massage, heat, trigger point therapy, talking to you -- can be effective, but PTs can do more rationally.

As regards your hip, a chiropractor would be likely to note that one leg is longer than the other and one side of your hip higher than the other. They'll be right. Same is true for me and billions of other people. One arm is also longer, it doesn't hurt your spine.

Plus the nature of the pain doesn't sound like a back issue, though I'm not a doctor.
post #5 of 46
Why not try PT instead...they perform the same type stretch and aliagnment plus will isolate muscle groups arround painful area to strengthen the said area
post #6 of 46
When I was just about your age, 29, I was having pain shooting down my right leg. I did not know what sciatica was. I saw a chiropractor that a friend recommended. First he put me on some contraption and adjusted some wires. Then he had me get down and showed me that my spine was, in fact, crooked. He then asked me if I had insurance because he wanted me to come in 3 times a week for the next 6-months and then probably once a week for an indefinate period of time after that.

My next stop was an orthopedic surgeon who put me into PT for the herniated disc he found and confirmed with Xrays and MRI in my lower back. I have been fine ever since and continue to do my back exercises 20 years later.

I believe that chiropracters can help and most are probably, hopefully, not like the one I saw. But while chiropractors can help alleviate symptoms, they do not seem to cure anything and you are sentencing yourself to a lifetime program of "adjustments".


My advice is to see a good orthopedic surgeon, but not one who likes to operate at the drop of a hat.
post #7 of 46
Thread Starter 
I realized this morning that the subject heading I chose was perhaps a bit too controversial. I'm not as interested in a debate over the legitimacy of Chiropractic as I am in hearing the positive and negative experiences had by those on the board. With that said, thanks to all who have responded to this point!

My amateur medical opinion says it's a tendonitis issue (as DP speculated) related to overuse. I say overuse because it only occurs after I've spent 10+ days straight on snow; I rarely suffer from it during the course of my normal Saturday/Sunday on snow with 5 days off each week routine. Nevertheless, if it returns this season, I'll be checking in with a sports medicine specialist. I just began a pre-season workout routine that involves some pretty hardcore plyometric stuff, so I'll keep tabs on the hip over the course of the next few weeks and see what happens.
post #8 of 46
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Uncle Louie View Post
Skitoofast....Understand that Chiropractic is not designed to "cure", though in some cases people can be realigned and stay properly aligned. Think of it more as maintanence. Just like a car. If you aligned it every week your tires would wear pretty straight and last longer.
I've heard others use the maintenance analogy, including the instructor who suggested my spine was misaligned. From a non-medical perspective, it seems to make sense - all those years of falling out of trees, on snow falls, getting blindside-jacked up on the football field, and all the other little things young males do to their bodies would certainly put the "tires" out of alignment.
post #9 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by iskitoofast4u View Post
This only occurs after prolonged periods (10 minutes +) of inactivity. After "walking it off" for a minute or two, the pain subsides to a tolerable level.
I'm far from being a doctor of any kind, but this seems pretty minor pain event to be seeking medical attention for. It sounds more like cramping. If it were tendonitis, as others have suggested, it would be more persistant, not something that can be walked off in a minute or two. If you can walk it off in a minute or two (less time than it would take to set up an appt with a Dr), I'd do two things: 1) Ignore it until it happens, and when it does, walk it off (maybe a beer or two would help ), and 2) Do some stretching each day, before and after skiing. Remember to stay hydrated and eat right.
post #10 of 46
I think that chiropracters have a legitmate function in handling spinal problems, but after years of regular visits to a Chirop I went through PT for some bulging discs. I have used the exercises & streches I learned in PT plus some stretches I figured out that replicate some of my chiropracters moves and haven't seen a chiro in years.

When I was in my early thirties I started having a hip pain similar to what you describe. I first experienced it doing an edge set on man made snow. It felt like a knife stabbing my hip. Eventually I saw a massage therapist while on a ski trip who taught me some stretches that pretty much solved the problem. I can't remember what she diagnosed by checking my range of movement and figuring what postions triggered the pain, but she helped me bigtime. 25 years later that hip is still doing well as long as I keep doing my exercises.

I don't know where you start to figure out the problem, but I bet the solution will involve strectching, hip specific exercises, Pilates or even yoga. A good chiropracter might get you started, but so may a PT. A good massage therapist in a ski town figured out my problem. Good luck. LewBob
post #11 of 46
Okay... here's a thread that I can jump in on.

I am a chiropractor. And I'm delighted to clear up any misunderstandings of the subject. (I don't know of any other subject on which there is more misunderstanding than chiropractic.)


I'll start off by saying this: some of the concepts and methodologies that some chiropractors use are quackery, pseudoscience, and hence potentially very dangerous. (as dp suggested) It's usually based on faulty reasoning, and crude understanding of human physiology.

---------------------------

In a nutshell... the basic idea of chiropractic is this: the nervous system is the "master control system" of the human body. This delicate, highly conductive network of tissue controls and coordinates all other body structures and systems. It's located within the spinal column... a flexible, articulated tube of bones. The major coaxial cable (spinal cord) that relays all information between the brain and the body's tissue cells is housed within the bones of the back and neck.

This particular anatomical location sets up a relationship between the structural and biomechanical integrity of the spinal column, and the ability of the nervous system to "transmit the proper information" (in crude terms) to coordinate and harmonize the body's functions.

Subtle "misalignments" (another crude term) or movement imbalances... commonly called "subluxations"... can often occur in the spinal articulations. When they do, they have adverse effects on the neurology, the vascular system, many of the soft tissues, etc. Chiropractors find and "adjust" these imbalances.

-----------------------------------------


Here are some problems with the chiropractic profession:

Some chiropractors believe that their adjustments can cure or fix any and all health problems and diseases. Consequently, they tend to be anti-medical ("Don't go to a medical doctor, come to me instead!"), anti-vaccination, and rather evangelistic in their views on health. This tends to stem from the mistaken idea of all health, wellness, and sickness being governed solely by the nervous system. Ergo, "Adjust the hard bone off the soft nerve, and your body will heal itself! Chiropractic gets sick people well!"

The missing word above is "sometimes."


Some chiropractors don't necessarily believe in the "cure-all" idea, but as dp pointed out, they will always recommend adjustments as the treatment you need. ("I have found the cause of your problem! Can you see on the X-ray where this bone is pinching this nerve?")

Two problems with this approach: 1. You can't see "bones pinching nerves" on an X-ray. 2. In most cases, a health problem or musculoskeletal problem does not have one single cause like "subluxation" or "tendonitis" or "slipped disk." Many, if not all health problems are multi-factorial. Unfortunately, this single-cause approach is rampant in the medical/orthopedic/surgical/PT field as well as the chiropractic field. Again, due to remedial views of the human body.


Some chiropractors are very aggressive with their treatments. The aggressiveness tends to come from the goal of "treating/fixing the pain," as if pain itself was the problem. Pain is simply your body's way of informing itself of tissue damage. If you simply mask or numb the pain (with drugs, shots, modalities, etc.), you don't necessarily fix the problem. If your pain happens to be a healthy, appropriate response by the body to best serve its own needs, then that pain needs to be the best and clearest expression of pain it can be. (as sadistic as it sounds)


Chiropractic adjustments used as a treatment for back and neck pain, and other musculoskeletal ailments, is a rather lousy, ineffective treatment. In many cases it works no better, and sometimes worse, than massage, exercise, acupuncture, even meditation... simply because most back pain is multifactorial. Adjusting the spine may help partially or temporarily, but may not be able to address other underlying contributory factors.

Unfortunately, insurance companies will only pay chiropractors to diagnose the cause of the back pain, and "treat" it with adjustments. And there is lots of money to be made by ripping off insurance companies. That's why crank's chiropractor asked about insurance, to determine how much money can be made off of crank's case. (Sad.)

CTKook also makes a great point:

Quote:
As regards your hip, a chiropractor would be likely to note that one leg is longer than the other and one side of your hip higher than the other. They'll be right. Same is true for me and billions of other people. One arm is also longer, it doesn't hurt your spine.
Excellent observation.

I love it when some chiropractors tell people, "Well... I've got bad news. You have a slight scoliosis in your spine."

Of course you do! Everybody has a slight scoliosis. Nobody's spine is geometrically straight! It's not supposed to be.


A few more points:

In many cases, PT procedures are completely different than proper chiropractic procedures. They may appear the same, and may even get similar results in "pain alleviation," but the actual physiological results can be quite different. Most PT spinal procedures are "gross" or "long lever" procedures to mobilize regions of the spine, whereas most chiropractic procedures are more specific to segmental imbalances. This is especially true in the upper cervical/neck area.

Chiropractic should be a gentle procedure. When done properly, it takes very little force to achieve a correction. There shouldn't be lots of cracking or popping. Although the excessive cracking isn't necessarily dangerous (and makes many patients feel good), it indicates random, sloppy adjusting techniques and sets the stage for future instability and biomechanical weakness. The adjustments should be specific and effective at correcting the imbalances, while not disturbing the healthy joints.


And finally... although I'll probably turn up some noses at this... everybody benefits from good chiropractic care, whether you have back pain or not. Many spinal imbalances are asymptomatic for several months or years, (just like many health problems and disease processes) and by the time they start causing pain or discomfort (if they ever do at all), significant damage and weakness can accumulate.

Correcting spinal imbalances when they happen, as opposed to 20 years later when chronic symptoms show up... goes a long way in allowing your body to work the way it was designed to work.

Getting your spine checked once in a while (and I mean "checked," to see if anything actually needs to be adjusted... not just going three times a week to get the same cracking procedure over and over) by a competent chiropractor helps your spine stay strong and flexible, and helps your body work better.

PT is not a substitue for chiropractic. Neither is massage, or exercise, or acupuncture, nutritional therapy, or medical care. And chiropractic is not a substitute for any of the above. Chiropractic is just one part of a healthy lifestyle, not a panacea or cure-all.

But spine and nervous system health is certainly an important part!


Hope this helps. (sorry so long.)
post #12 of 46
Some of the claims made are unbelievable and probably just done so for repeat business.

OTOH it definitely helped my mom and others I know with back and neck pain.

There's probably information we don't know about the nervous system, but as far as I know their claims of curing illness with adjustments haven't been clinically proven by anyone.
post #13 of 46
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by JohnH View Post
I'm far from being a doctor of any kind, but this seems pretty minor pain event to be seeking medical attention for. It sounds more like cramping. If it were tendonitis, as others have suggested, it would be more persistant, not something that can be walked off in a minute or two. If you can walk it off in a minute or two (less time than it would take to set up an appt with a Dr), I'd do two things: 1) Ignore it until it happens, and when it does, walk it off (maybe a beer or two would help ), and 2) Do some stretching each day, before and after skiing. Remember to stay hydrated and eat right.
Actually, after I thought about it for a bit, I realized it wasn't only a one or two minute thing. If I was sitting (Apres-ski, for example) for a while after the day was done, I would have intense pain for a minute or two when I finally stood up. However, the pain remained, and was very noticeable anytime an upward motion was required from my right leg - going up stairs, picking my foot up to click into my ski, getting in and out of the car, etc.
post #14 of 46
Baja,

Great post. I have used chiropractic on and off for the last 10 years. The problem is finding someone who is not in the "how much insurance coverage do you have mode or the quackery mode". Figuring out who is good in this regard is a real challenge and puts me off using chiropractic as a preventive/helpful measure. I only use it when somethings' gone awry.

I would love to use it "regularly" or as preventative maintenace, but the hassle of finding someone who sounds like you is too much trouble.

I got lucky traveling to Milwaukee this summer, when my back "blew up" on the way. I picked someone out of the phone book, did a little phone interview, went. She did a great job getting me able to golf the next day at Whistling Straits, which I didn't want to miss, and would have without her help.

You don't live in the Cleveland area, do you?
post #15 of 46
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by LewBob View Post
I don't know where you start to figure out the problem, but I bet the solution will involve strectching, hip specific exercises, Pilates or even yoga. A good chiropracter might get you started, but so may a PT. A good massage therapist in a ski town figured out my problem. Good luck. LewBob
I actually tried yoga for several weeks at the urging of a my girlfriend at the time. Unfortunately, I don't have the "mindset" for yoga...it was just too slow and too boring.
post #16 of 46
Sorry, buz. I’m in the northeast tip of New Jersey.

I wish I knew a good chiropractor in the Cleveland area, but I don’t. And I wish that more chiropractors had convenient, accessible, affordable practices… and less chiropractors subscribed to quackery and esoteric methodologies, or start off the healthcare relationship by measuring up the patient’s insurance dollar resources.

I also wish more chiropractors had accessible hours. It seems the popular work hours for chiropractors are MWF, 10-12 and 3-7. That doesn’t work for most people! (at least not in my community) I think weekend hours are a must, as well as late evening hours at least once or twice a week. (8 pm or later) My busiest time of the week is Sunday between 11 and 2.


Here’s my advice to the general public when looking for a chiropractor:


A word-of-mouth referral is the best source to finding any good professional. Ask your family, friends, neighbors and coworkers which chiropractor they go to. Your personal friends are probably your best source for referrals. Birds of a feather flock together, so if a friend likes their chiropractor, chances are that you will too.

If you don’t have any personal referrals from someone you know, and decide to look in the yellow pages or other list resources… I would suggest looking for a chiropractor who advertises/markets as a “Family Chiropractor.” Chances are, this type of chiropractor sees patients of all different ages, and has a decent amount of children in the practice. If a chiropractor can connect with kids, they probably have a good personality and are easy to talk to. They are also likely to use good, gentle adjusting techniques if they adjust children on a regular basis.

In my experience and observation of chiropractors, women tend to be better adjusters than men. (Of course there are exceptions) Since men are usually larger and stronger than women, men can use their size and upper body strength to “move those bones.” (Sorry, but that’s how many chiropractors judge the effectiveness of their techniques… by how well they can make joints go “pop.”) Since most women lack that kind of brute strength, they have to develop skill, accuracy, and finesse in their adjusting techniques. My chiropractor is a woman, and she’s the best adjuster I could find in my community. She’s not nearly as good as my buddy Gino, but he lives 2 hours away from me.

The adjustments should be rather gentle, and feel good. The adjustment itself should never hurt. In a minority of cases, a little soreness the day after a first adjustment is normal and healthy… just like sore muscles after a heavy workout. That soreness should pass in a few days or visits, and subsequent adjustments shouldn’t cause any post-soreness at all. You should never feel like your spine is being forced or “manipulated.” Lots of cracking and popping is NOT a good sign. It indicates sloppy technique diversified through numerous joints, rather than a skilled, specific adjustment that helps to gently correct imbalances without disturbing the surrounding joints.


You may have to test out a few chiropractors before you find one you like. Don’t get pressured into hard-sell tactics, or prepaying thousands of dollars for long-term treatment unless you feel comfortable doing so. If the chiropractor is pushy or trying to scare you about the consequences of not getting started immediately on a long program of visits, ( “This is a serious problem, and if you don’t take care of it now, your spine will rot and you will die!” ) RUN OUT OF THAT OFFICE AND DON’T LOOK BACK.

Healthcare decisions should always be the patient’s choice. I don’t like pushy sales tactics to bully people into commitments.

A competent chiropractor will answer all your questions competently and professionally, and the answers should sound rational and make sense. Don’t accept dismissive answers or vague evasions of your concerns. You’ll know pretty quickly how well a chiropractor knows his or her craft by the way they communicate with you. I would avoid chiropractors who badmouth other healthcare professionals, particularly medical doctors.


I would be wary of discounts, coupons, and free offers. As many people would guess, this is often used as a bait-and-switch tactic to get someone into the office for the hard sales pitch. How many reputable professionals do you know (doctors, accountants, attorneys, etc., even restaurants) that attempt to drum up business by offering free sessions or visits?


Hope this helps.
post #17 of 46
You may wish to head over to this site and look around a bit.

http://www.chirobase.org/

After years of litigating medical related issues, I believe that Chiropractic is the most responsible of the alternative medicine practices. However, that is not an endorsement and I do not endorse Chiropractic. Over the years, I worked closely with a number of Chiro's whom I trusted implicitly. I met many others I didn't. Baja sounds like many of the Chiro experts I employed. They are hard to find.

Mark
post #18 of 46

Your mileage may vary.

When I had my back problems, I went to a chirporactor after my regular doctor had simply prescribed muscle relaxers and things later suddenly turned much worse. My doc was up front about the regular treatment issue and worked the problem from the diet, lifestyle and exercise angles as well as manipulating me. He did a lot of testing of pressure points and strength of obscure muscles. I always felt a lot better at the end of a session but was extremely tired, especially in the early sessions. As the diet, lifestyle and exercise changes started to kick in, I needed fewer and fewer sessions and eventually was able to stop going. My doc was going to continuing education sessions about 3x month. Spine manipulation was part of the treatment, but it was avery small part.
post #19 of 46
After reading Maddog's post, (Thank you, by the way), I thought you folks would get a kick out of this.

I certainly did!

Chiropractor claims to travel through time - More Health News - MSNBC.com



And here is another one of my esteemed colleagues:

Song of the Spine Book by Dr. June Leslie Wieder, Bone-Toning Vibrational Therapy



and another:

Frequently Asked Questions FAQ - The Reconnection


Enjoy!
post #20 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by skidbump View Post
Why not try PT instead...they perform the same type stretch and aliagnment plus will isolate muscle groups arround painful area to strengthen the said area
A good chiro will use the same techniques. Mine also uses, e-stim and ultrasound. I have been going to them all my life. Just like DR's, some are good and some are bad. It's the person, not the profession. Some of it's use is limited (like MD's) but much of it is very helpful especially when paired with stretching, excercise and good diets and health practices. If it didn't work then why do neurologists and other dr.s I've been to advocate their use with back and neck problems? This is just like accupuncture, most western dr.s don't understand it, they never studied it, so they just criticize it.
post #21 of 46
don't forget massage therapy. Not talking about the olden days of happy endings here but trained personnel in the art of manipulation - of the musculature that is! .
post #22 of 46
Hey Baja- Do you know Dr. David Singer? I used to go to him back in the 70's. Tall Pine Chiro center in Piscataway.
post #23 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by Finndog View Post
A good chiro will use the same techniques. Mine also uses, e-stim and ultrasound. I have been going to them all my life. Just like DR's, some are good and some are bad. It's the person, not the profession. Some of it's use is limited (like MD's) but much of it is very helpful especially when paired with stretching, excercise and good diets and health practices. If it didn't work then why do neurologists and other dr.s I've been to advocate their use with back and neck problems? This is just like accupuncture, most western dr.s don't understand it, they never studied it, so they just criticize it.
I once had the opportunity to talk to a chiropractor for a couple of hours. He told me chiro was the only health care anyone needed, and it could even replace antibiotics and vacines. He was a quack.
Some chiropractors limit their practice to things that won't hurt you, but it's all based on quackery.

BK
post #24 of 46

Osteopathic Manipulation

DP offers the best advice. But after you have run the traps with a sports medicine specialist or orthopedist and you still think a chiropractor would be appropriate for your situation, you might instead consider an Osteopath that specializes in osteopathic manipulation. I've been trying it for several weeks for lower back problems and it seems to help.
post #25 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bode Klammer View Post
I once had the opportunity to talk to a chiropractor for a couple of hours. He told me chiro was the only health care anyone needed, and it could even replace antibiotics and vacines. He was a quack.
If that is what he told you, then yes, he is a quack, and shouldn't be allowed to practice.

It's one thing to understand the risks and problems of antibiotics and vaccines, but it's another thing to think that spinal adjustments can provide the same "protection" that these and other medical procedures can provide.


Quote:
Some chiropractors limit their practice to things that won't hurt you, but it's all based on quackery.

BK
I must respectfully disagree.

Let's all admit, as Finndog pointed out, that there are good and bad professionals in every field. Chiropractors are certainly no exception.

But there are many competent and rational chiropractors who provide an excellent service to the public, and their methods are based on sound observations and concepts. Not only do they practice things "that won't hurt you," they help millions of people every day, oftentimes where other interventions have failed.


Chiropractic practiced as a panacea cure-all, and/or as a replacement for medical care, is quackery. (and hence, potentially dangerous to the public)

Chiropractic practiced as an occasional patch-up for musculoskeletal pain is legitimate and relatively safe, (provided the diagnosis is accurate) but very limiting in benefit.

Chiropractic practiced as an ongoing integral component to intelligent living (which includes proper nutrition, adequate proper exercise, adequate rest, positive mental and emotional attitude, moderation/minimization of unnecessary stress, etc.) provides the most benefit. Your neural system plays a key role in all these aspects of health, and a subluxated/imbalanced spine inhibits the proper functioning of the central and peripheral nerve system. A competent chiropractor is the only professional who is trained to analyze your spine properly for evidence of spinal subluxation, (osteopaths, PT's, physiatrists, massage therapists, and all other healthcare professionals lack this training) and can correct the imbalances most safely and most effectively, compared to all other practitioners.


You know what's great about the way I practice chiropractic?

It doesn't interfere with any other treatment or therapy you're receiving. In fact, good chiropractic care will only help and enhance the results of other therapeutic interventions by freeing up obstruction in the nerve system.

It doesn't duplicate nor encroach upon other professions already being practiced by better trained personnel. (physical therapy, nutrition, exercise/stretching, massage, medicine, etc.)

It never puts people in danger by potentially delaying medical care. (This is the #1 lawsuit brought against chiropractors... mistaken diagnosis and delay of necessary medical intervention) I don't practice medicine, nor advocate that chiropractors play the role of "family doctor." People should see a medical doctor when they need to, and get their spine checked regularly because their body will work better without subluxations than with them.

Never, ever take medical advice from a chiropractor. And never, ever take chiropractic advice from a medical doctor. (or any other healthcare professional) They are both equally dangerous to your health, and equally unprofessional.


That's all for now. I don't write this to preach from my soapbox... I'm writing it to clear up the rampant misinformation and confusion some of you folks may have. (Unfortunately, it seems that much of this misinformation is coming from other chiropractors with a very distorted and dangerously erratic understanding of human physiology)
post #26 of 46
Finndog...

Yes, I know David Singer. (not personally, but I know of him very well)

He had quite a successful practice back in the 70's, from what I understand.

Today, he's one of the leading "practice management" consultants for chiropractors:

Dr. David Singer :: David Singer Enterprises


He's very articulate and polished. Not necessarily my style of practice, but he's an effective communicator nonetheless.
post #27 of 46
I had an employee who was referred to a chiro and he said it was nothing but a waste of time and money. My wife cannot survive without her monthly alignment. After three weeks she starts getting stuffed sinuses and then serious headaches and after her four week visit she gets off the table and feels all the "stuff" flowing down her throat and voila the headaches are gone for three weeks or so. If it is a "placebo" effect or a scientific "re-alignment" I don't care as long as she is happy afterward I'll keep throwing the $40 his way. Cheaper than some other "solutions".
post #28 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by Baja View Post

Let's all admit, as Finndog pointed out, that there are good and bad professionals in every field. Chiropractors are certainly no exception.

But there are many competent and rational chiropractors who provide an excellent service to the public, and their methods are based on sound observations and concepts. Not only do they practice things "that won't hurt you," they help millions of people every day, oftentimes where other interventions have failed.


Chiropractic practiced as a panacea cure-all, and/or as a replacement for medical care, is quackery. (and hence, potentially dangerous to the public)

Chiropractic practiced as an occasional patch-up for musculoskeletal pain is legitimate and relatively safe, (provided the diagnosis is accurate) but very limiting in benefit.

Chiropractic practiced as an ongoing integral component to intelligent living (which includes proper nutrition, adequate proper exercise, adequate rest, positive mental and emotional attitude, moderation/minimization of unnecessary stress, etc.) provides the most benefit. Your neural system plays a key role in all these aspects of health, and a subluxated/imbalanced spine inhibits the proper functioning of the central and peripheral nerve system. A competent chiropractor is the only professional who is trained to analyze your spine properly for evidence of spinal subluxation, (osteopaths, PT's, physiatrists, massage therapists, and all other healthcare professionals lack this training) and can correct the imbalances most safely and most effectively, compared to all other practitioners.


You know what's great about the way I practice chiropractic?

It doesn't interfere with any other treatment or therapy you're receiving. In fact, good chiropractic care will only help and enhance the results of other therapeutic interventions by freeing up obstruction in the nerve system.

It doesn't duplicate nor encroach upon other professions already being practiced by better trained personnel. (physical therapy, nutrition, exercise/stretching, massage, medicine, etc.)

It never puts people in danger by potentially delaying medical care. (This is the #1 lawsuit brought against chiropractors... mistaken diagnosis and delay of necessary medical intervention) I don't practice medicine, nor advocate that chiropractors play the role of "family doctor." People should see a medical doctor when they need to, and get their spine checked regularly because their body will work better without subluxations than with them.

Never, ever take medical advice from a chiropractor. And never, ever take chiropractic advice from a medical doctor. (or any other healthcare professional) They are both equally dangerous to your health, and equally unprofessional.


That's all for now. I don't write this to preach from my soapbox... I'm writing it to clear up the rampant misinformation and confusion some of you folks may have. (Unfortunately, it seems that much of this misinformation is coming from other chiropractors with a very distorted and dangerously erratic understanding of human physiology)
All that is just a long way of saying that you do what I wrote above: limit your practice to things that won't hurt anyone. there's no question that certain types of manipulation can provide relief for back pain or other problems, but those treatments are available from massage therapists and/or physical therapist as well. The claims and techniques that are exclusive to chiropractic are not based on science.
While there may be good and bad practioners in every field, it is only in chiropractic that the "good practioner" is good precisely because he avoids many of the claims and techniques that define his profession.
That sounds like quakery to me, but I'm glad you're making a good living without harming anyone.

BK
post #29 of 46
Quote:
Originally Posted by dp View Post
My opinion (as a physician) is that chiropracters can sometimes be very helpful--- BUT the problem is the theory behind their practice is complete quackery and pseudoscience... Treatment may perhaps involve manipulative or physical therapy, but you should do it because there is a rational scientific reason to do so. Remember, if all you have is a hammer, everything looks like a nail- if you go to a chiropracter they are certain to recommend chiropractic manipulation for your "spinal misalignment"!
+1
BK
post #30 of 46
Baja, do you also write? I just happened to come across this on one of the writng job boards.
http://sandiego.craigslist.org/wri/212491873.html
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