EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › Ski Gear Discussion › Perscription inserts or over the glasses goggles?
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Perscription inserts or over the glasses goggles?

post #1 of 23
Thread Starter 
Which is better? My husband needs to replace his goggles and isn't sure which way to go. He tried on the K2 One goggles and like them (they're the over the glass type), but I'm wondering if he might like inserts better. Anyone have any experience or recommendations?

Thanks!
post #2 of 23
Lasik.

Personally when I had glasses/contacts, there was NO WAY I could ski with glasses even back when I was a teenager, it just gave me tunnelvision and made me feel like I was 8 feet tall. I know he is limited in his situations so, with that said, go for whatever brings the lenses as close to his eyes to reduce that effect. The further the lense is from the eye will make your him see more out of a fish bowl.
post #3 of 23
I got some over-the-glasses goggs last season and quite liked them, but if it's rainy or blizzardy weather, they do fog. Big problem to my mind with prescription lenses in the goggs, is what happens when you go inside?! Although there's a similar problem with sunnies too. which is why I generally wear contacts when skiing.
post #4 of 23
I had glaucoma surgery last year and can no longer wear soft contacts.

I went to Smith Turbo (2 speed fan w/Battery pack) and the Smith Ocular Docking system. I use a very powerful antifog treatment on the insert lenses called FogTech. I ski in a Race style helmet which excerbates the fogging problem, even though my helmet has a vent. It does not have a lot of airflow.
The Fan (low speed can be left on all day & you use the high speed when you slow down or get in the lift line to keep them clear) along with the FogTech (available on-line & REI) that I would reaaply lunch worked pretty darn well!

FogTech comes in individual packaged wipes so you can throw a couple of those in your pocket and reapply at lunch. You only need to do the insert lenses since the inside of the goggle lense itself does not fog up and is permanently anti fog coated.

This sytem worked very well once I got the anti fog product figured out. If he wears a more ventilated helmet like a Giro Fuse that would probably help th fog problem immensely.

I am working on breaking my eyes into hard gas permeable lenses so I can go back to me Briko Icarus goggles! But it is a slow process for me!

Wearing glasses under my goggles is not an option, they are progressive bifocals and i did not want to go that route.

another solution which i use on sunny days are panoptx prescription sunglasses with removable eye ups that seal around you eyes. The eycups have a separate lenses from the glasses frame and can be permantly anti fog coated. I got Scirroco frame. Check 'em out!

www.panoptx.com
post #5 of 23
i'm a life long glasses wearer and i wear over-the-glasses Carreras. They've been great, but the top vents are starting to erode and the double lens have finally separated, so it's time to shop for a new pair. I've never had much problems other than entering the hot lodge for lunch/beers and having the glasses steam up. Easy remedy: don't stop for lunch!

if anybody has any suggestions for new goggles that fit over glasses, I'm all ears.
post #6 of 23
My over-glasses goggs are Bolles, and they are photochromatic. I've been very pleased with them, the peripheral vision is excellent. and I know they are good at sun because my glasses underneath, which are also photochromatic, don't trigger.
Only problem is the gogg lenses sit proud of the frame, and they scratch up way too easily.
post #7 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by Atomicman View Post
I had glaucoma surgery last year and can no longer wear soft contacts.

I went to Smith Turbo (2 speed fan w/Battery pack) and the Smith Ocular Docking system. I use a very powerful antifog treatment on the insert lenses called FogTech. I ski in a Race style helmet which excerbates the fogging problem, even though my helmet has a vent. It does not have a lot of airflow.
The Fan (low speed can be left on all day & you use the high speed when you slow down or get in the lift line to keep them clear) along with the FogTech (available on-line & REI) that I would reaaply lunch worked pretty darn well!

FogTech comes in individual packaged wipes so you can throw a couple of those in your pocket and reapply at lunch. You only need to do the insert lenses since the inside of the goggle lense itself does not fog up and is permanently anti fog coated.

This sytem worked very well once I got the anti fog product figured out. If he wears a more ventilated helmet like a Giro Fuse that would probably help th fog problem immensely.

I am working on breaking my eyes into hard gas permeable lenses so I can go back to me Briko Icarus goggles! But it is a slow process for me!

Wearing glasses under my goggles is not an option, they are progressive bifocals and i did not want to go that route.

another solution which i use on sunny days are panoptx prescription sunglasses with removable eye ups that seal around you eyes. The eycups have a separate lenses from the glasses frame and can be permantly anti fog coated. I got Scirroco frame. Check 'em out!

www.panoptx.com
I got the Velocity CV Scirocco
http://www.panoptx.com/html/s_sirocco.htm
post #8 of 23
I wear the Smith Knowlege OTG without the fan and like them alot. I bought several different lens colors and like how easy it is to change them out. I do still have some fogging once in a while but only when I'm working really hard.
post #9 of 23
I use the Smith Turbo goggles with the Ocular Docking System. I found that Walmart would fill the prescription for a ludicruously low price compared to anywhere else. In the past I have skied with Bolle and their inserts, but the turbo works a lot better. I do find that the Turbo can quit with little or no notice, so I always have extra batteries with me.
post #10 of 23
I use the Smith Turbo goggles with the Ocular Docking System. I found that Walmart would fill the prescription for a ludicruously low price compared to anywhere else. In the past I have skied with Bolle and their inserts, but the turbo works a lot better. I do find that the Turbo can quit with little or no notice, so I always have extra batteries with me. I have
post #11 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by FOG View Post
I use the Smith Turbo goggles with the Ocular Docking System. I found that Walmart would fill the prescription for a ludicruously low price compared to anywhere else. In the past I have skied with Bolle and their inserts, but the turbo works a lot better. I do find that the Turbo can quit with little or no notice, so I always have extra batteries with me. I have
I don't know about the ocular docking system, but my husband wears glasses, uses the Smith OTG turbo fan goggles for dirtbiking and skiing. Never an issue if you keep it powered.
He's a little upset that they've changed the style recently and it makes it a more snug fit over his glasses.
post #12 of 23
Four or five years ago, when I started to get back into skiing, I decided to try daily disposable contacts for skiing and other sport use, despite having stopped wearing contacts on a regular basis 20 years ago.

I have absolutely no regrets. Infinitely easier to deal with, because I can take your goggles off when needed and still see. And it means I can have many more selections for eyewear -- right now, a pair of polychromatic OTG Bolles (I got OTGs in case my eyes couldn't handle contacts one morning, but have yet to need them), a pair of Bolle polarized goggles, and a pair of sunglasses -- without dealing with the prescription issue.
post #13 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by alpinedad View Post
Four or five years ago, when I started to get back into skiing, I decided to try daily disposable contacts for skiing and other sport use, despite having stopped wearing contacts on a regular basis 20 years ago.

I have absolutely no regrets. Infinitely easier to deal with, because I can take your goggles off when needed and still see. And it means I can have many more selections for eyewear -- right now, a pair of polychromatic OTG Bolles (I got OTGs in case my eyes couldn't handle contacts one morning, but have yet to need them), a pair of Bolle polarized goggles, and a pair of sunglasses -- without dealing with the prescription issue.
Without a doubt the best solution!
post #14 of 23
Thread Starter 
Wish he could go that way, but unfortunately, my husband can't wear contacts.
post #15 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ski Diva View Post
Wish he could go that way, but unfortunately, my husband can't wear contacts.
By the way with Panoptx glasses I went with the photochromatic dawn to dusk lense.

Gets plenty light enough to see in the lodge easily at lunch and is very dark in the bright direct sun! I remove the eyecups (they just clip in & out) and use them for my regular sunglsses so i don't look like a mountaineering geek when i am driving arond town.

When skiing with the eyecups in, absolutely no wind gets in my eyes. I can go as fast as i want and not tear up!
post #16 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by dookey67 View Post
i'm a life long glasses wearer and i wear over-the-glasses Carreras. They've been great, but the top vents are starting to erode and the double lens have finally separated, so it's time to shop for a new pair. I've never had much problems other than entering the hot lodge for lunch/beers and having the glasses steam up. Easy remedy: don't stop for lunch!

if anybody has any suggestions for new goggles that fit over glasses, I'm all ears.
My aunt uses these Carreras and has had no trouble with them. If need be, get some defog and you should be fine. Id defintely recommend the goggles rather than prescription lens, that could be expensive in a fall.
post #17 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by Brock Landers View Post
Id defintely recommend the goggles rather than prescription lens, that could be expensive in a fall.
Could you explain this further?
post #18 of 23
well, if you land on your face on hardpack you could crack the goggles. if they're perscription, then you're a$$ out.

post #19 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by dookey67 View Post
well, if you land on your face on hardpack you could crack the goggles. if they're perscription, then you're a$$ out.

Nope, the Smith Ocular docking system lens is not part of the gogle lense. it is comprised of 2 separate lenses (like glasses) that hang down on a metal and plastic clip that you clip into the goggle lense. Special holes are in the lens for this purpose. they are above the visible lense in the flange that fits into the lens groove. in the frame. the lenses hang down inside of the goggles between your face and the goggle double lense. This makes earpices and the nosepiece like on regular eyeglasses completely unnecessary. Also keeps the prescription lenses from being vulnerable in a fall.

http://www.sporteyes.com/smith%20ods.jpg

http://www.sporteyes.com/smith%2520ods.jpg&imgrefurl=http://www.sporteyes.com/smgturb.htm&h=195&w=297&sz=5&hl=en&start=2&tbnid=Z 5jsHRInP2GlwM:&tbnh=76&tbnw=116&prev=/images%3Fq%3DSmith%2BOcular%2Bdocking%2Bsystem%26s vnum%3D10%26hl%3Den%26lr%3D%26rls%3DGGLG,GGLG:2006-24,GGLG:en
post #20 of 23
I usually use contacts, but I have also got a pair of Rudy Project wrap-around glasses with the RX insert. Not only do they work well, but I've had a number of very positive comments from folks when they see them. I recommend them (they have goggles, as well, but I haven't tried them).
post #21 of 23
I wear contacts, but my son uses prescription goggles. I got them from someplace I found with Google. As I recall, they weren't that much more than plain goggles. They were certainly cheaper than his everyday eyeglasses.

The downsides to presription goggles are peripheral vision and lunchtime -- you either need to carry glasses, or not see what you eat.
post #22 of 23
I have used the Uvex Rx goggle for many years with very good results.
post #23 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by mdf View Post
I wear contacts, but my son uses prescription goggles. I got them from someplace I found with Google. As I recall, they weren't that much more than plain goggles. They were certainly cheaper than his everyday eyeglasses.

The downsides to presription goggles are peripheral vision and lunchtime -- you either need to carry glasses, or not see what you eat.
You do need glasses at lunch. I always have my prescription Panoptx in my pocket.

Peripheral vision is not a problem with the Smith Ocular Docking system. it is just like having glasses on, but without earpieces and a nosepiece.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Ski Gear Discussion
EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › Ski Gear Discussion › Perscription inserts or over the glasses goggles?