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How To Define "Cruising"

post #1 of 25
Thread Starter 
I'm an unapologetic cruiser, a level 6 skier in no great hurry to ascend the skills ladder, though I would like to refine my skills. I sometimes feel that cruising has a bad name, perhaps because it seems to involve techniques more readily accessible to lower-level skiers?

Anyway, I like to cruise ... or at least, I thought I did. In general, it seems to me that cruising is defined in very different ways by different skiers. Maybe I'm not even cruising. Maybe I've been doing something else.

So here's my question: in terms of technique, what exactly defines the art of cruising, in your opinion? How do you distinguish it as a mode of approaching a hill?


Without a bit of a definition, I think it's hard to improve one's cruising ability and know that's what one's doing.
post #2 of 25

Making clean GS/Super G turns...

...outside a course without getting caught...
post #3 of 25
Interesting question, Trot. I don't see "cruising" as a technique at all, but an attitude and approach to the mountain. I will go out and cruise some days and contrast that to "rippin'" or otherwise pouring on the energy level and difficulty of terrain. What each of us considers cruising is directly related to terrain where we're comfortable and the technique we use there.

I can ski a green run and be "rippin'" to some extent because I'm playing with something new. I can also ski a black and be cruising because I'm just taking it easy and out for some turns.

What do you think cruising is?
post #4 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by Trotski View Post
I'm an unapologetic cruiser, a level 6 skier in no great hurry to ascend the skills ladder, though I would like to refine my skills. I sometimes feel that cruising has a bad name, perhaps because it seems to involve techniques more readily accessible to lower-level skiers?

Anyway, I like to cruise ... or at least, I thought I did. In general, it seems to me that cruising is defined in very different ways by different skiers. Maybe I'm not even cruising. Maybe I've been doing something else.

So here's my question: in terms of technique, what exactly defines the art of cruising, in your opinion? How do you distinguish it as a mode of approaching a hill?


Without a bit of a definition, I think it's hard to improve one's cruising ability and know that's what one's doing.


"In terms of technique", I define cruising as skiing at a moderately "spirited" velocity unencumbered by any extraneous succession of shorter radius turns, but with emphasis on either hip angulation or all-body inclination.

A relaxed, upright stance effects this end.

Hem
post #5 of 25
I definitely agree that cruising is more a tactic then a technique. Just dialing it back a notch or 3 and enjoying the sensations of skiing.
post #6 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by tief schnee View Post
I definitely agree that cruising is more a tactic then a technique. Just dialing it back a notch or 3 and enjoying the sensations of skiing.


Crusing is the utility of a distinct technical amalgam
which precludes knee angulation and short radius turning.

Hem
BTC
post #7 of 25
My definition would be just messing around and riding the sidecut of my skis without really "working" them and playing on whatever rollers, off camber sections and places where the trail banks to mix it up a little.

I've taught lessons to people who sound exactly like you Trotski and our focus has generally been on getting them a little more centered. This makes it even more effortless,makes terrain changes more fun and makes things a bit safer by making speed control easier when required.
Have fun.
post #8 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by bennyr View Post
My definition would be just messing around and riding the sidecut of my skis without really "working" them and playing on whatever rollers, off camber sections and places where the trail banks to mix it up a little.

I've taught lessons to people who sound exactly like you Trotski and our focus has generally been on getting them a little more centered. This makes it even more effortless,makes terrain changes more fun and makes things a bit safer by making speed control easier when required.
Have fun.

Excellent
Thank You
Hem
post #9 of 25
Cruising - to me means about 2/3 to 3/4 pace with no really short turns. No worries about trying to limit or increase speed. No maximum g-forces.

Depending on the run, you could be cruizing along and come to a corner where, while in the corner, you are no longer cruizing, but ripping.
post #10 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by Trotski View Post
I'm an unapologetic cruiser, a level 6 skier in no great hurry to ascend the skills ladder, though I would like to refine my skills. I sometimes feel that cruising has a bad name, perhaps because it seems to involve techniques more readily accessible to lower-level skiers?

Anyway, I like to cruise ... or at least, I thought I did. In general, it seems to me that cruising is defined in very different ways by different skiers. Maybe I'm not even cruising. Maybe I've been doing something else.

So here's my question: in terms of technique, what exactly defines the art of cruising, in your opinion? How do you distinguish it as a mode of approaching a hill?


Without a bit of a definition, I think it's hard to improve one's cruising ability and know that's what one's doing.

My definition of cruising: Skiing on autopilot, wide open slopes no crowds to speak of, not thinking about any tasks/tech etc. Enjoying the view and the ride. Sort of like driving down an open freeway. Could be on any type of trail, green, blue, black depending on ones ability and comfort level. As Hem had mentioned a relax more upright stance, not a lot of angulation going on, very little stress on the joints except for the jaw bone with the smile /grin you are wearing.
Contrast that with what I call cranking which to me means all out concentration, lots of angulation, joints working moderately hard, muscles firing quickly or working a long hard bursts. That could be short round turns, bump skiing, working the trees, fast GS/super G rippers, tight turns down a steep chute. But my cranking type of skiing could be someone elses cruising, all depends on the skill level.
post #11 of 25
Some of the best ski time I have ever spent was in my "intermediate period" Lots of cruising (exploring?) with a group. Frequent stops to rest legs that weren't being used very efficiently. (Remember straight skis?).

I think that I liked the part of growing my skill set the most. That is when I got turned on to instructing. At that point I was able to quickly see quantum leaps in my ability to handle varied terrain.

I guess the point to this little 'cruise' is that maybe you don't want be so quick to relegate yourself to level 6 forever. It only gets better during and after the learning process.

You don't need to tackle huge challenges but take on some. Push the envelope a little.
post #12 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by Trotski View Post
So here's my question: in terms of technique, what exactly defines the art of cruising, in your opinion? How do you distinguish it as a mode of approaching a hill?


Without a bit of a definition, I think it's hard to improve one's cruising ability and know that's what one's doing.
Ever play Pac-Man?

muncha-muncha-muncha... I'll have a little of this... and a little of that ... muncha-muncha... oh yeah, inhale those dots ... muncha-muncha.... OH! look at that ... whoa! - not this way ... yeah, that way .. such a pig I am ... muncha muncha muncha .... more dots please ...
post #13 of 25
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by ssh View Post
What do you think cruising is?
Good question! I think of it, I guess, as carving long-radius turns, sometimes fast, sometimes slow, but with an emphasis on conserving rather than expending energy, and everything smothered in smoothness.

Quote:
Originally Posted by hemingway View Post
"In terms of technique", I define cruising as skiing at a moderately "spirited" velocity unencumbered by any extraneous succession of shorter radius turns, but with emphasis on either hip angulation or all-body inclination.

A relaxed, upright stance effects this end.
That sounds way more sophisticated than I am! : But come to think of it, may I am sort of doing a bit of that...

Quote:
Originally Posted by bennyr View Post
I've taught lessons to people who sound exactly like you Trotski and our focus has generally been on getting them a little more centered. This makes it even more effortless,makes terrain changes more fun and makes things a bit safer by making speed control easier when required.
Have fun.
I've appreciated people's various definitions, and this post is especially interesting to me.
post #14 of 25
I like the autopilot analogy.
Cruising, in my book, means effortlessly flowing down the mountain. It usualy involve big arc turns or some good oldfashioned 'godille' (how does it translate in english ?! let me know, please) on thight spots.
Key word : effortless. If you can't do it all day, it's not cruising.
post #15 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by bennyr View Post
My definition would be just messing around and riding the sidecut of my skis without really "working" them and playing on whatever rollers, off camber sections and places where the trail banks to mix it up a little.

my def exactly
post #16 of 25
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by philippeR View Post
... It usualy involve big arc turns or some good oldfashioned 'godille' (how does it translate in english ?! let me know, please) on thight spots.
... someone who knows what they're talking about should come in here and answer you, but according to the website of the Skiing History Association (http://www.skiinghistory.org/history.html), the godille is a type of turn, born in France, involving "counter-rotation," and represents an evolutionary step up from the Austrian Arlberg snowplow/stem turning. But I'm obviously no technique expert so take this with a grain of salt!
post #17 of 25
When your skiing (or boarding) is all about rhythm and dance, not speed, that's when your cruising :-)
Some more thoughts on the subject from a few years ago:

http://www.dcski.com/articles/view_a...57&mode=search
post #18 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jamesj View Post
When your skiing (or boarding) is all about rhythm and dance, not speed, that's when your cruising :-)
Some more thoughts on the subject from a few years ago:

http://www.dcski.com/articles/view_a...57&mode=search
Jamesj - I share the vision of where you're going with your definition. Mine's "playing with the mountain" with no particular objective in mind.

It still requires an athletic/balanced stance, an engaged mind, and all other techniques at the ready for dealing with whatever terrain features are sampled. Cruising is fluid and flowing, can include LRTs and well as SRTs. It's about eating up mileage and sampling the "local fare" - maybe you go left, maybe you go right - no decisions until you get there.

Skiing in an environment which can be unplanned and unstructured - free to suck up a few quick bumps, then pop out and link a few LRTs as you speed away before rolling over a knoll. Or maybe rip a couple of tight SRTs before the knoll, see what's on the other side, then launch it. Cruising is done on terrain that isn't so technical in nature that it forces specific tactics to be pulled from the bag. Which also means the more tactics residing in one's bag, the more grey the definition of "cruising terrain" becomes.

What troubles me with the term "auto-pilot" is any relationship to a pilot flipping a switch and heading to the galley for coffee. For me, it's important that "cruising" not be defined as mindlessly being taken for a ride. …cruising's still being a pilot, but operating without a flight plan.
post #19 of 25
I think of cruising more along the lines of "auto pilot". I don't necessarily consider playing with terrain, ripping off a few bumps, etc, as cruising. To me, crusing implies a pitch/run that you are easily comfortable on, has no major distractions to make you have to think too much about your turns, and doesn't require any more effort than walking in street shoes on pavement. In my head, once you start playing with terrain and making various sized turns at varying speeds, etc., you're doing what is referred to these days as free riding or cranking as snowbowler mentioned. Cruising is something any intermediate 60-70 year old can do (and usually does, with a big fat smile on their face). Maybe chillin' out while you are skiing is a good definition.

I don't think anyone has said there is anything wrong with it, but I just want to be clear that there is nothing wrong with cruising. We all do quite a bit of it. Especially those of us that don't have extensive off piste areas to ski.
post #20 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by JohnH View Post
... crusing implies a pitch/run that you are easily comfortable on, has no major distractions to make you have to think too much about your turns, and doesn't require any more effort than walking in street shoes on pavement.
Sounds like it was very valuable for Trotski to ask for a common definition then. Because unless someone is just learning to ski/board, the bolded description doesn't even define skiing to me. I know I'm splitting hairs and semantics, so cruisin' on out ....
post #21 of 25
When I say cruising, I mean riding the sidecut on an easy slope and not trying anything new. When you cruise, you don't care about speed or turn shape, you only care about skiing down the mountain.

This is probably what a huge percentage of skiers are doing. When you start to think, but moreso to analyze and to understand, you aren't cruising anymore.
post #22 of 25
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by BillyRay View Post
When I say cruising, I mean riding the sidecut on an easy slope and not trying anything new. When you cruise, you don't care about speed or turn shape, you only care about skiing down the mountain.

This is probably what a huge percentage of skiers are doing. When you start to think, but moreso to analyze and to understand, you aren't cruising anymore.
Billy i gotta admit I feel like I quite deliberately cruise.
post #23 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by BillyRay View Post
...I mean riding the sidecut on an easy slope and not trying anything new...


actually, cruising provides a great opportunity to play with pressuring the outside edge of the inside ski to initiate turns. ride it on through, switch to the other inside ski/outside edge, etc.

just to mix things up, get a feel for that poor neglected edge. doesn't detract from the "fun and easy" aspect at all.

other'n that, my cruising is chasing milesb to the next steep, short turn shot; in other words, it's when i breathe.
post #24 of 25
Whatever you do on groomed terrain that isn't "bombing" or "racing"? That's the way I think of it, although all of what people said about playing with the edges and the terrain variation, skiing that's about rhythm etc makes sense to me, since that's what I am usually doing on groomed slopes.
post #25 of 25
cruising to me usually means moderate slope and no rotaty(ie movement that make me tired) present at all. Park and ride carving on auto pilot. Nothing wrong with that if you want to be lazy and still look like a king to the public.
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