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new skier

post #1 of 8
Thread Starter 
hi my name is adam. I'm new to the forum and have never skied befor. I just got set up with new gear and gona give it a shot this year. Are 1080 boots salamon binding and rossignol scatch bc a good setup for a beginer. Also do you guys have any tips, like i said i've never done this befor but i've snowboarded for about five years and snowmobiled agressivly almost all my life. what would be the best way to get started. By the way great site.
post #2 of 8
Quote:
Originally Posted by theherm312 View Post
hi my name is adam. I'm new to the forum and have never skied befor. I just got set up with new gear and gona give it a shot this year. Are 1080 boots salamon binding and rossignol scatch bc a good setup for a beginer. Also do you guys have any tips, like i said i've never done this befor but i've snowboarded for about five years and snowmobiled agressivly almost all my life. what would be the best way to get started. By the way great site.
Spend your first day on good rental skis with a psia certified instructor.
There may be many things about your current gear which may not make it the best learning equipment.

You haven't mentioned the ski length or boot fit.
Use rentals which will be fitted to you specifically.

Insist on a certified instructor.

Welcome to skiing,
Hem
post #3 of 8
Like hem said take a lesson first thing. You won't be sorry starting out on the right ski. And welcome to Epic and Alpine skiing,your going to love it.
post #4 of 8
Yeah, you've been set up with a pretty aggressive boot/ski combo. I've got the Scratch BC and a similar boot. The BC's would be like trying to turn a giant spatula for a beginner. They're wide and not very forgiving on groomed runs. I'm not saying it won't work, but these guys are right. Most ski areas will offer a rental/ticket/lesson combo at an affordable price where you can get the basics down before you jump on the twin tips and start getting aggro. A good rental ski will be built a little better for the learning curve.

Sounds like you've gotten a feel for witersports thru Boarding and Snowmobiling, so skiing SHOULD be your next conquest!!! Start off on the right foot and get the lesson.

Best of luck,

Spag
post #5 of 8
I'd echo the advice already given about renting skis and signing up for a lesson. However, if your boots fit you well, I'd just rent the skis for the first outing/lesson.
post #6 of 8
Quote:
Originally Posted by Notorious Spag View Post
Start off on the right foot and get the lesson.
Quote:
Originally Posted by slider
You won't be sorry starting out on the right ski.
I'm sorry, this is just tooo tempting...

So, when do we get to the left foot?

...

Other than the small detail that you probably want to use both feet, the advice to rent appropriate equipment and get a lesson from someone who knows how to teach stands. Some things are similar to your board (you are standing on something that slides and balance is still a Big Deal), and some things are quite different (you have twice as many edges and only one foot on each ski).

Give yourself a real chance to learn. When you first started on your board, you tended to fall down easily at low speed, partly because both feet were attached to the same board. With skis, you will be able to make more compensating moves to prevent falling. With the balance skills you already have, you may find you're going much faster than you were on your board before something finally knocks you over. For most of us, it's best not to discover the consequences of this the hard way.

Beware of friends who "know how to ski." Maybe they do. Maybe they ski really well, but have no idea how to teach. Maybe they think they know more than they really do. Maybe they don't really understand what happens when you put someone with no control skills at the top of what looks to them like an easy green run. In the interest of having a fun season which does not involve an extended relationship with an orthopedic surgeon, visit the ski school.

Take a lesson. Initially, use equipment that's not too difficult to manage. You'll discover skiing is versatile, subtle and fun. Someday, it will let you do those long traverses to freshies - traverses that were a royal pain on your board.


And, you might actually do an exercise on just one foot when you're just getting started. Of course, you might be left footed...
post #7 of 8
Theherm312, WELCOME! Where do you hail from? Hope you enjoy your first season on the skis, and many more to come.

Mark
post #8 of 8
IMHO if you've been boarding for 5 years, you should be carving down the hill with the board. The physics of the ski are no different. You will pick it up in no time. By all means take a lesson, but if you take it on the rental skis, be careful not to go too fast; most rental skis don't like too much speed.
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