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The Man Who Skied Everest - In Henke Boots!

post #1 of 14
Thread Starter 
Has anyone else seen the HD Discovery special on "The Man Who Skied Mt. Everest"?

A Japanese dude who descended about 6,000 feet on pure ice in just over 2 min., and fell, sliding about 1,300 feet, coming to a stop 250 feet before a lethal ice gorge - all on circa 1970 Fisher skies, bindings and Henke leather boots.

His alternative skis were all K2's, of similar vintage (think Glen Plake).

The Japanese team comprised dozens of people, tons of equipment and millions of $$ in investment. All this, to ski on 35 year-old equipment? They couldn't afford a pair of Mantras?

On a sad note: 6 Sherpas died in the effort.
post #2 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by Captain_Strato View Post
......All this, to ski on 35 year-old equipment? .........
It wasn't 35 year old stuff in 1970.
post #3 of 14
I wanted to see this thing but I dont have an HD TV, can you view it on a regular TV with digital cable?
post #4 of 14
I haven't seen the TV show but I would love to. I met that man in Lake Louise after his famous descent. He was surrounded by an entourage of about 12 people who were taking photos and treating him like royalty. He was introduced to me as the "man who skied down Everest." I asked him about the Swallow skis he was promoting and he said that they were the skis he used to ski down Everest. Apparently not. I can't wait to see the movie now.
post #5 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by Captain_Strato View Post
Has anyone else seen the HD Discovery special on "The Man Who Skied Mt. Everest"?

A Japanese dude who descended about 6,000 feet on pure ice in just over 2 min., and fell, sliding about 1,300 feet, coming to a stop 250 feet before a lethal ice gorge - all on circa 1970 Fisher skies, bindings and Henke leather boots.

His alternative skis were all K2's, of similar vintage (think Glen Plake).

The Japanese team comprised dozens of people, tons of equipment and millions of $$ in investment. All this, to ski on 35 year-old equipment? They couldn't afford a pair of Mantras?

On a sad note: 6 Sherpas died in the effort.
Long before Glen Plake. I suspect Glen was in grade school when that guy made his attempt.

Did the TV program mention that he had a parachute that he deployed when he fell and started sliding?

Did it mention that there was a somewhat significant miscalculation in that there wasn't enough air density at that altitude to fully inflate the chute and that all it did was drag uselessly as he slid down the face?

It sounds like it DID mention how incredibly lucky he was to come to rest a few meters before going over an enormous cliff.

He did this about the time that the first European and US "extreme" skiers were starting to ski insanely steep things around the globe. People like Saudan and Vallencant and Chris Noble who were risking their own lives and no one else's. The Japanese guy's effort was largely judged to be a dangerous, stupid, and costly stunt at the time.

What DID work for him is that the mere idea of someone "skiing" Everest was, at the time, such an amazing idea that he made quite a lot of money on the film and story rights. Beyond that, the whole thing was very quickly dismissed as almost meaningless in the evolution of adventure skiing.

Sorry for the rant.
post #6 of 14
I saw the movie when it first came out. You would think if your plan was to go straigt down Everest and then open a parachute that you might check to make sure the density of the air at that elevation would have the desired affect to slow you down. What a moron. He did not "ski" Everest. He went straight, fell down, and then slid for a very long time.
post #7 of 14
Thread Starter 
Hmmm...The film was listed on HD Net as "2006", not "1970".

If this event indeed took place in 1970, the 70's gear makes sense.

He did have the parachute, but it appeared he was out of control all the way (pure survival skiing in a stem-christie).

Still, it took cahones to pull off a stunt like that. Incredibly dangerous - especially with leather boots and straight skis. His edge control was goofy all the way.

I'm surprised no information was listed on the event date - just "2006" (obviously the HD Net release date).

I've never seen such glassy, wind-polished ice. Pure suicide.
post #8 of 14
I think I saw the movie in the late 70s in Missoula, Montana. It was either at the college or local theatre. Maybe they just re-edited it. The "skier" evidenced a true kamakazi mentality and absolutely no skiing ability whatsoever.
post #9 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by mudfoot View Post
I think I saw the movie in the late 70s in Missoula, Montana. It was either at the college or local theatre. Maybe they just re-edited it. The "skier" evidenced a true kamakazi mentality and absolutely no skiing ability whatsoever.
Yes, I remember that movie too.
To be fair to the guy (re his lack of skills), considered the thin air, he was probably struggling just to not pass out ...
post #10 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by Captain_Strato View Post
Hmmm...The film was listed on HD Net as "2006", not "1970".

If this event indeed took place in 1970, the 70's gear makes sense.

He did have the parachute, but it appeared he was out of control all the way (pure survival skiing in a stem-christie).

Still, it took cahones to pull off a stunt like that. Incredibly dangerous - especially with leather boots and straight skis. His edge control was goofy all the way.

I'm surprised no information was listed on the event date - just "2006" (obviously the HD Net release date).

I've never seen such glassy, wind-polished ice. Pure suicide.
The adverts in the few days prior to HDNET's airing of the program also stated "remastered digitally" or something like that. I remember seeing this the first time it was on TV 30+ years ago.
post #11 of 14
while i didn't see the Discovery Channel "version" I imagine they just broadcast the actual 1970's film in HD.

i actually broke down and rented it via Greencine (a hipper, more indie version of Netflix) after a co-worker had seen it on Discovery Channel. it's pretty crazy, especially the last 15 minutes.

i was thinking about the film the other day, too, after that other post about self-arrest.

and i tried to track down Swallow Skis after seeing the film, but had no luck.
post #12 of 14
The man who skied Mt. Everest is named Yuichiro Miura. Whatever else you might say about him, he apparently comes from a long line of skiing die-hards. Article below describes another admirably wacko event a couple years ago when his father, Keizo Miura, skied Snowbird, UT at age 100.

http://www.everestnews.com/stories00...ki03012004.htm

Second article describes Yuichiro's recent attempts to set record as oldest man to summit Everest, now at about age 70.

http://www.k2news.com/everestnews3/miura.htm
post #13 of 14
On a similar vein, Rob and Kit Deslauriers are currently at Everest base camp in their bid to ski (from the summit) Everest. Kit has already skied the other 6 highest peaks (highest on each continent) if she is successful she'll be the first person to SKI the 7 summits.
post #14 of 14
Thread Starter 
It's remarkable that there were few obvious clues regarding the vintage of the film (except for the skis and boots).

I suppose down coats, ropes, crampons and aluminum crevasse ladders haven't changed much.

The HD Net visual quality is true HD - excellent. It's not faded and scratched as one might expect.

Come to think of it, I thought the mullet hairstyles on those Sherpas looked dated.
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