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Do you ski with wrists in/out of your pole straps? - Page 2

post #31 of 44
Thread Starter 
From some of the answers to other posts, I'm surprised that know one has posted that the resort they ski at requires everyone to use there wrist straps.
post #32 of 44
Powerhound,
I think you need to broaden your horizons!

Different countries and different places have different customs and differentways of life, just cause we don't all live like you, doesn't mean you're wrong, so I won't assume that.

Try to understand we are a multi-cultured forum, all part of this global community, and try to get on with others here.


And a more general note: one should never slag off another's culture or style unless they have personal experience of it.

Back to the question - I use my straps, because I was taught to, and I think they are there for that purpose, but I'm very careful of damaging my fingers & thumbs as it could affect my finger picking.
I understand people not using straps, but that's not the way I ski.


S
post #33 of 44
Thread Starter 
"Powerhound,
I think you need to broaden your horizons!
Different countries and different places have different customs and differentways of life, just cause we don't all live like you, doesn't mean you're wrong, so I won't assume that.

Try to understand we are a multi-cultured forum, all part of this global community, and try to get on with others here.


And a more general note: one should never slag off another's culture or style unless they have personal experience of it."

-- uhh, huh? What in the world are talking about?
post #34 of 44
When skiing in potential avalanche areas I was always taught to take my straps off, so that there would be one less source of entanglement should we get caught in a slide.

At my old ski area, Ski School used to help with avalanche cutting years ago - and it was a rule that you had to have your straps off.

Other than that, always on for me (though they are not straps).
post #35 of 44
Despite resorts caution statments, I keep my straps on all the time, including while loading and unloading the lift.

If I don't, there is just too much temptation to throw my poles at people!
post #36 of 44
Pole straps do have their place but there are situations where you absolutely do not want to be attached to your poles. The best example that springs to mind is skiing steep, exposed lines. If you're doing a line where a fall is unacceptable, you'd better know how to self-arrest and that requires that you NOT be in your straps (whippets excepted). I'd much rather hike for a dropped pole than slide into the rocks because I couldn't get my hand off the grip. Two or three times I've blown it and taken a slide where I was able to stop myself in time because I could quickly get into self-arrest position which would have been nearly impossible with the straps on.

Of course, if you're on tamer stuff and prone to dropping poles, straps are fine. BTW I've never wear poles and never dropped one on a steep line, where they're really needed (usually they're held in an adrenaline fueled death grip [img]smile.gif[/img] )
post #37 of 44
This is one of the areas that is examined during PSIA on snow testing. Improper donning of the poles can cut you down a notch.
post #38 of 44
<BLOCKQUOTE>quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Dave M:
...If you're doing a line where a fall is unacceptable, you'd better know how to self-arrest and that requires that you NOT be in your straps (whippets excepted)...<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

Would you mind giving some more detail on this?

I've done ice-ax self-arrests enough times, but I'm curious, what sort of self-arrest technique for skiers are you talking about (both with and without whippets)?

Without whippets, are you talking about digging in the tip of one of your poles by pressing on the basket (and staying head-uphill)? Or, are you talking about getting up on your forearms (head downhill) with your ski(s) / boot(s) dragging in the snow uphill from you?

Obviously, there is always the old question of head uphill (and possibly catching an edge and cartwheeling) vs head downhill (you probably won't cartwheel, but you risk damage to your head).

I've never used whippets, but I know that with an ice-ax, its often hard to get the pick to dig in effectively unless you are practically laying on the shaft, so how do you us a pair of short-picked whippets effectively?

Tom / PM

<FONT COLOR="#800080" SIZE="1">[ March 13, 2002 07:39 PM: Message edited 1 time, by PhysicsMan ]</font>
post #39 of 44
I don't ski in extreme conditions. I almost always strap in once I get going. But there is a time that I don't strap in. When the trail is freshly groomed and the crowd is small, I just leave my poles behind and ski without them. Do other people ski without poles just for the fun of it?
post #40 of 44
RE Psia requirements I asked about that since I am using the leki trigger system. Our examiner mentioned that if you have a different system and are using it correctly they will not hold it against you however if you have conventional straps and are holding them wrong, they will knock off a point or 2 during your demos.
post #41 of 44
Hi Physicsman,
There is really good discussion of the technique here

The way I've always practiced and done it is to ditch one pole as soon as I know I'm not stopping anytime soon, grap the remaining pole with the other hand right above the basket, slide the pole hand about 10 inches above the basket and press on it with all of my weight. I have it in up by my shoulder and always try to get my skis downhill, you don't want to be sliding headfirst even if it means risking a cartwheel.

Never used the Whippets myself, but a buddy uses almost all the time on spring tours and says they're really easy to use. He also says he HAS to wear his straps with them because once you dig them in, they try to twist away. He fell on some relativly mellow terrain, just rolled over and dug both picks in. Looked really easy, but of course there's always the risk of impaling yourself (main reason I haven't tried 'em).

If your're skiing the kind of stuff where a self-arrest might be required, I'd recommend that you find a steep, out of the way place with a safe runout and practice until you can almost do it by reflex. Might save you some day.

Hope this helps [img]smile.gif[/img]
post #42 of 44
Dave -

Thanks for the link. That was a good discussion over on telemarktips.com.

Their recommendations are pretty much what I do, except that I would add that if its stupid-steep and/or you already have picked up a lot of speed, the chance of cartwheeling really goes up, and once this starts, you might as well be a rag doll - you've lost pretty much all chance for control, so you should do everything possible to avoid cartwheeling.

Sure, going slow and on moderate pitches, give the feet-downhill ski-pole-arrest a try, but if the situation is more extreme than this, I would really try to rotate into a feet-uphill position. With them uphill of me, I can drag them / dig them in all I want and never have to worry about cartwheeling. I might not come to a complete stop, but at least I won't keep picking up speed. Of course, you've got a real dilema on your hands if your are heading for a rock - do you protect your head or risk cartwheeling.

My other main problem with the feet downhill position is that I find it almost impossible to keep the skis from occasionally digging into the snow if they are downhill of me and the terrain is at all bumpy. It seemed that even if I had my feet up, I didn't have enough control of the tips/tail to ensure that they would stay completely off the snow. Then, once some part touches and starts to dig in, you lose much of your control of them, and if the conditions are bad enough, you are on your way to carwheeling.

Whippets scare me too, but probably the best procedure with them is (upon falling) immediately ditch one (just like you would with a normal ski pole), and use the other like a short picked ice ax with a really long shaft. Rotating out of your hand is a real possibility even with a normal ice ax if you don't grip the head firmly with one hand while the other is on the shaft. Using only one hand per Whippet, twisting flat looks almost inevitable.

Now the real question is how do you practice these moves? Just consider getting on a lift with Whippets in place - you'd probably get stares like you were Freddy Kruger himself - grin.

Anyway, just my $0.02.

Tom / PM
post #43 of 44
I'm an outie...

I jammed my thumbs to many times when I was younger to want my hands through the straps. If I crash and burn, I want to be able to let go of the poles if I choose. Personally, I find skis, poles, and goggles going flying in different directions as I sommersault down the mountain scores much higher on the crash index!

Seriously though, I don't relish the thought of being hooked into my poles if I hook onto a tree, a person, or whatever at high speed.

Another reason I prefer to have my hands out is I find it makes me more aware of what I'm doing with my hands and my poles (eg, Am i keeping them out in front where I want them? Am I squeezing them too hard, and thereby wasting energy tensing up?).
post #44 of 44
I stay strapped all the time, wherever and whatever the run or conditions (including on the lifts, purely for convenience).

If I am doing chutes or areas where I can't afford to fall, the last thing I want is to lose a pole, and I have never heard that theory about being unstrapped for arresting. In my opinion, if you fall where you are going to need to try and arrest, chances are you won't have a hope in hell of arresting, certainly not with a ski pole. I would sooner try and regain my feet knowing I still had poles attached.
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EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › General Skiing Discussion › Do you ski with wrists in/out of your pole straps?