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fixing "lazy" form, techniques and habits - Page 2

post #31 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by telerod15 View Post
Maybe encourage her to do things that make boring terrain fun. Carving, sking on one ski, carving switch, carving switch on one ski...
More great insight! Learning how to play on that terrain is a real kick. Show her how you play with it. Arc, rr tracks, one-footed, and more...
post #32 of 51
Hi Honey,
I went to a web page and asked for some advice about your skiing. I told them how well you ski hard terrain but how lazy you are on easy terrain. They suggested I take away your skiing priveleges when I think you are being lazy.

Sounds like a plan to me, a very bad plan. Why does this matter so much to dad?

I have two adult daughters who are both expert, all mountain skiers. Niether had to endure my calling them lazy because of their skiing. I also never felt compelled to take away their skiing priveleges because I perceived a lack of effort on their part. My advice is to enjoy her company, celebrate the opportunity to share the experience, and stop being so critical. Ten years from now will her turns be what you remember most about skiing together?
post #33 of 51
My kids much prefer steep bumpy tree runs than skiing with their family. They really do "put up with it" for our sake.

Maybe, just maybe, she perceives her family as the stone around her neck that forces her to ski the boring stuff? And what do you think she will remember in ten years? That skiing with family sucks.

If that is true, can you really make her have fun on your terms?

Give her a radio or hire and instructor to let her make the choice of terrain -- or go home. Nothing good will come of skiing bored.
post #34 of 51
If that is true, can you really make her have fun on your terms? You don't get it.

Sharing some quality time with family isn't about the little details like ski technique. Just like Thanksgiving dinner isn't about how you use a fork. It's about family coming together to celebrate being a family. Critical "advice" has no place in that situation.
Let me share a story with you.
A dear friend of mine goes to Vail once a year (New Years) and skis a particular run. Halfway down the run she stops at an old familiar tree and talks to her dad. They shared that spot for decades and even though he passed away ten years ago, she keeps that tradition alive. The difference now is she shares that spot with her kids. Skiing can be so much more than technique.
post #35 of 51
she's eleven and she knows how to push dad's buttons. i'm sure your displeasure is written all over your face.

leave her alone.

how do i know this? i have a 13 year old daughter and your description is very familiar.
post #36 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by justanotherskipro View Post
If that is true, can you really make her have fun on your terms? You don't get it.

Sharing some quality time with family isn't about the little details like ski technique. Just like Thanksgiving dinner isn't about how you use a fork. It's about family coming together to celebrate being a family. Critical "advice" has no place in that situation.
Let me share a story with you.
A dear friend of mine goes to Vail once a year (New Years) and skis a particular run. Halfway down the run she stops at an old familiar tree and talks to her dad. They shared that spot for decades and even though he passed away ten years ago, she keeps that tradition alive. The difference now is she shares that spot with her kids. Skiing can be so much more than technique.
that's a wonderful story.

around our house we say....."what would a day of skiing be without a raging fight."
post #37 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by justanotherskipro View Post
If that is true, can you really make her have fun on your terms? You don't get it.

Sharing some quality time with family isn't about the little details like ski technique. Just like Thanksgiving dinner isn't about how you use a fork. It's about family coming together to celebrate being a family. Critical "advice" has no place in that situation.
What don't I get? That daddy should be able to manufacture an environment that will make someone that would rather not be there have fun?

The point is that the kids demeanour suggests a bigger problem. One that I don't think will be solved by a nice chat by a tree.

If it is about having fun actually skiing, then ask her where she wants to ski and make it happen.
post #38 of 51
Maybe she's doing what she wants to do and having a good time. Chill out, dad and leave her alone.
post #39 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by skier31 View Post
Maybe she's doing what she wants to do and having a good time. Chill out, dad and leave her alone.
Well said!

E,
Here is what I think you are missing:
Guy is calling his kid lazy on a public chat site because she is not always skiing up to his expectations. Bad form Dad!

Secondly, I would offer the idea that the only thing he can change about her skiing is his opinion.
post #40 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by gschlact View Post
What would be the groups recommendations on how to break her of this Laziness...
Not to keep ripping on the dad here, since I think its great he takes his daughter skiing...

I still do this skiing with my Dad and its just because I am relaxing on the way through some easy terrain. You are making way too big a deal out of this and will burn your daughter out if you harass her about it. I got somewhat irritated when an instructor I had chatted with on the way up a lift ride was following behind me and mentioned I was being lazy with my hands while we were gliding along some flats on the way to another ski lift. I don't want all of my skiing to be under a microscope.

Perhaps she might need some creative ideas to challenge her on the easy stuff. Have a contest with her to see who can ski the longest on one foot or something. Then buy her hot chocolate when she wins for putting up with your demands
post #41 of 51
This reminds me of my favorite skiing story. Back before I had kids, I was skiing at Stowe. Many of the trails start from an easy ridgeline. I was standing at the entrance to Star (one of the hardest trails at Stowe, an old fashioned steep, narrow, icy Eastern trail, for those who haven't been there).

A man and a little girl, maybe kindergarten age, ski up. The girl sits down on the snow and starts to cry. I'm thinking to myself "Oh great, another father pushing too hard, he's going to make his daughter hate skiing.. "

Shows how wrong you can be about another family's dynamics.

The dad looks down, and says in a calm voice "if you are going to cry, you can't ski Star." The little girl stops crying and stands up, and they take off together down the trail.
post #42 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rusty Guy View Post
she's eleven and she knows how to push dad's buttons. i'm sure your displeasure is written all over your face.

leave her alone.

how do i know this? i have a 13 year old daughter and your description is very familiar.


that was why I posted the bit on "4wd skiing" that kid just was not that interested in skiing with dad and her younger sisters.... skiing with me (so she could check out the young males free of participation from watching family) and going "4wd skiing" on the other hand was FAR more interesting
post #43 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rusty Guy View Post
she's eleven and she knows how to push dad's buttons. i'm sure your displeasure is written all over your face.

leave her alone.

how do i know this? i have a 13 year old daughter and your description is very familiar.
At what age do they grow out of that? (I'm taking a guess at 75...)
post #44 of 51
Like some other people have said, when skiing with your own kid just have fun... don't put pressure on them to ski at their "best" or worry about how they are skiing except when they ask for advice!

I remember last season teaching the 10-year old of a PSIA LIII instructor (this was a wedge turn class). Before the lesson starts, he tells me his son can ski on the quad, and that he takes his son up to the top at Whistler.

When we start the lesson, the kid can barely stand up on his skis, has no ability to maintain a wedge and performing a wedge turn is clearly not going to happen. When I try and engage him and get him involved in what the class is doing and having some fun, the only response I get (about 15 minutes into the lesson) is "I hate to go skiing" and "how long until the lesson is over?". Needless to say, not a fun time for the kid, even though I pulled every trick and game for kids I had out of the book to try and make the experience as pleasant as possible.

Clearly, his dad was projecting his own desire and passion to his son. We all want our kids to have as much fun as we do skiing, but pressuring them isn't the right thing to do, for life's way too short.

Make it fun and when's she's ready to push herself to be better, she will!
post #45 of 51
The only, problem that I have with doing nothing in this case; regarding lazy style on the easy stuff is that is when an injury is apt to happen.

It's kinda like quitting to fly the airplane when you are 20' off the ground cause' you're almost home. Old flying thing was ..... you never quit flying it till it's tied down on the ramp!

I have had my dumbest "ooops" things happen when I was in "cruise mode" on a flat ..... caught an edge and that kind of stuff.

In a gentle way, I'd mention to her that .... it's ok to cruise a bit ... just don't "stop skiing" when you are doing it.
post #46 of 51
Like others have said already. The desire to become obsessed with skiing and feel it the way you do...comes from within. Hopefully your daughter will experience that someday and hunger for it like the rest of us. Until such time, make sure you're gettin' some for yourself! Its possible she is not destined to be a ski freak.
post #47 of 51
Quote:
Originally Posted by justanotherskipro View Post
Well said!

E,
Here is what I think you are missing:
Guy is calling his kid lazy on a public chat site because she is not always skiing up to his expectations. Bad form Dad!

Secondly, I would offer the idea that the only thing he can change about her skiing is his opinion.
Maybe so, maybe so...

I've got a couple kids myself, and they do that sort of thing too from time time -- usually when skiiing is only about getting to where they'd really rather be -- the bumps in the trees. My solution is to get them to as many bumps and trees that they can handle.

They truly are not paying all that much attention until they get there. Yuki is correct, I've seen them lose it by their lack of attention.

Eventually, they really want to ski on the trails too -- just after they're done with the tougher stuff.
post #48 of 51
Thread Starter 
Here are some of my miscellaneous responses to the many suggestions:

1. daughter enjoys the family skiing
2. daughter still gets lessons some of the days (about 6/year) and free ski's other times.
3. These bad habits are catching up with her and beginning to materialize in the more advanced terrain - this is main motivation of my first post!
4. Asking her about her observations of other skiiers - good idea.
5. Contests on the blue runs, good idea
6. Family having fun - yes.
7. Her bored at times on the blues - yes; but doesn't always want to do bumps/trees.
8. Will work on her interest level and visualization.

Don't worry - I am very proud of her and work hard to not show my criticism of her blue-run bad habits.

Plus she has her younger sister (3 yrs) that now can in some cases surpass here on some slopes (confidence factor + started skiin at 2yr old w/ pacifier and diapers :-))

Thanks again.
Guy
post #49 of 51
Is it possible she is undergoing a growth spurt now, and instead of making movements, bracing? Has she recently gained a lot of height/weight?
post #50 of 51
Thread Starter 
BigE-
I would say she has grown but not to any inordinary amount for either height or weight.

I think the 'poor-form' (formerly called lazy in thiis thread) is really a combination of enjoying going fast, or some boredom with the blue slope.

I think I will explore some of the ideas here to have her realize it herself and re-emphasize how proper technique is really practice for the other skiing and will really help her other on blacks even though she is at the tiem skiing a blue.

Part of the materializing into her black skiing that I allueded to was more back seat in the bumps than she ever had been.

Here's to looking to a new season.

Regards,
guy
post #51 of 51
It could be worse, she might want to take up snowboarding???:


Opps, did I type that outloud?
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