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The financial irresponsibility of ski trips - Page 2

post #31 of 58
Warren Miller gave the best advice: 'Do It Now, Because Next Year You'll Be A Year Older".
post #32 of 58
I'm sitting at my desk right now. The desk has a glass cover with 16 photos of my family, in-laws etc. taken on ski trips spanning 12 years. Every working day brings a smile no matter whats going on (epic coffee mug helps!). Memories are reinforced rather easily by these pictures. I find no impending need to keep financial statements on my desk top. My wife and I have well maintained 10 year old vehicles. Money saved from car payments more than pay for several ski trips a year. I have my priorities!
post #33 of 58
I don't know if the original poster is convinced, but I sure as hell am: SKIING VACATIONS ARE A NECESSITY OF LIFE.

Thanks for all the input Bears, I feel better about spending all that money for only 15 days/year, year after year (7 in a row).

Oh, I'm starting to plan our annual trek, this time to LLouise, Sunshine, Marmot and Kicking H., March 25-April 8, 2007. And my son will miss 5 school days, then again he'll be barely 8 y/o. So, as y'all know, get ready for all my stupid questions!
post #34 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gpaul View Post
I'm starting to plan our annual trek, this time to LLouise, Sunshine, Marmot and Kicking H., March 25-April 8, 2007. And my son will miss 5 school days, then again he'll be barely 8 y/o. So, as y'all know, get ready for all my stupid questions!
Yep, my daughter (also 8) missed 6 days in our Washington-Oregon family vacation in late August/early September. I think she's going to remember this trip for a long time. Skiing in August, mountains, ocean, forest, cities...

Been to the first three, I haven't made it to Kicking Horse yet. The drive between LLouise and Marmot is my favorite that I've seen on this globe. : Did it in July and March - simply beautiful. I am not a local, but I would be more than happy to tell you what I know. Just send me in PM if you stupid questions (I'll try to answer to the serious questions also).
post #35 of 58
My father in law (a very conservative man) scrimped and saved for retirement all of his life. His wife was killed in a car wreck at 62 years old. He told me, go and do with your family. I would give every dime I had for 1 more vacation with my wife.
post #36 of 58
For a bit of balance, I would not be too hard on those who scrimp and save all their lives. They do it with the best of intentions.

Holidays or vacations are a relatively new concept for the average person. Farmers never used to take holidays. A holiday for many Londoners used to be a working holiday - hop-picking in Kent.

New immigrants often spend all their time and focus on successfully establishing themselves. They say one generation often establishes a business, the next consolidates it and the third fritters it all away.

There is a lot to be said for being able to live without too many toys or indulgences.

I do really love skiing - but if it got taken away from me I would cope. A necessity ? No, not when you really think about it.
post #37 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by Patrick View Post
Yep, my daughter (also 8) missed 6 days in our Washington-Oregon family vacation in late August/early September. I think she's going to remember this trip for a long time. Skiing in August, mountains, ocean, forest, cities...

Been to the first three, I haven't made it to Kicking Horse yet. The drive between LLouise and Marmot is my favorite that I've seen on this globe. : Did it in July and March - simply beautiful. I am not a local, but I would be more than happy to tell you what I know. Just send me in PM if you stupid questions (I'll try to answer to the serious questions also).
Thanky Patrick, will PM shortly.
post #38 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by dady8tor View Post
My father in law (a very conservative man) scrimped and saved for retirement all of his life. His wife was killed in a car wreck at 62 years old. He told me, go and do with your family. I would give every dime I had for 1 more vacation with my wife.
Touching. And encouraging. Gracias.
post #39 of 58
Here's my take:

I'm 26 and broke. I spend all of my money on World Travel, Harley Davidsons, Airplanes, and Skis Trips. I refuse to wait to do any of it. I have seen a lot of very dear people leave this world well before their time. The future is important, but never sacrifice the present. Too many people sacrifice the best years of their lives preparing for something that they may not even live to see. I hope that doesn't sound too morbid, but like I said, I have seen a lot of VERY close people go before their time. I refuse to let my life pass me by. I say live it up! It's good for you, and it's good for your kids. :
post #40 of 58
Six years ago, my brother, age 56 and in supposed good health, dropped dead from a brain aneurysm.

Thank God that a few years before, he finally took back up after years of deferring it what was his dream: to be a pilot and own a plane. A few years before, he finished getting his private pilot's license and bought his own plane. He and his wife had a handful of years flying all on the spur of the moment, to have dinner a few hundred miles away, visit friends & family, go on an impromptu getaway, or whatever they felt like.

That had a lot to do with my decision two years ago to move to the mountains. You just don't know how long you have, or how long someone you love and want to spend time with, has to share with you. He was nine years older than me to the day. Even if there's some kind of weird cosmic clock where I check out 9 years to the day later, or sooner, every minute of these last two years has been worth it. Hopefully there's a lot more memories to come, but at least I feel like I'm living rather than existing.

Make the memories for yourself and with your loved ones now. Don't take the food out of your mouths to do it - sure, have some sense of the practicalities of what you need now and in the future if the universe gives you that time. But live it now.
post #41 of 58
Funny how we aren't hearing from 65+ year olds who have to work as night watchmen because they made foolish finacial choices.
post #42 of 58
probably because they get a season's pass from the resort they're doing the night watchman gig for.
post #43 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by icanseeformiles(andmiles) View Post
probably because they get a season's pass from the resort they're doing the night watchman gig for.
Word!
post #44 of 58
Skiing is no doubt a very expensive sport, but it's worth every cent of it. You can't get the adrenaline rush and freshness from any other sport.
post #45 of 58
My signature says it all.
post #46 of 58
I spent a decade as a pension consultant (appointed by the teachers' organization) for our defined benefit plan. When talking to people about retirement, I always asked them three questions: 1. How do you feel about going in to work everyday? 2. Do you have enough financial resources to meet your planned retirement lifestyle? 3. What will you do when you are no longer working?

The key question is number 3. People don't usually change their routine and their activities when they retire. Travellers continue to travel. Volunteers continue to volunteer. Skiers ....well you get the point!

The key to a successful and healthy retirement is to make sure you are active and involved for the five or ten year period prior to retirement, then you will find the transition easy to spending more time in non-work activities. That's one of the reasons I started cross-country skiing about ten years ago and down-hill skiing about five years ago.

I may not drive into the parking lot in a new SUV, my hotel or hostel rooms are by no means five star, and my equipment is usually bought on sale and kept for quite some time, but I'm out on the slopes 35 to 50 days a year. My plan is to double that in three years when I retire, and I won't worry about what might have happened if I delayed taking up these activities until I actually turned 55 and channeled the money into other investments. I don't worry about the money we've spent as a family on vacations and trips over the years (even though I'll have to watch my expenses even more closely this year after a four week trip to Italy and Austria). You can't bank life and redeem it 20 or 30 years down the road, you have to live it day to day.
post #47 of 58
It's one of the most fundamental questions of life - how do you balance enjoying life now with financial securtity later? Everyone strikes a slightly different balance. I have a lot of friends that have been climbing/skiing bums that are now at or approaching 50 with no retirement security at all, but they've had a hell of a lot of fun up til now. The balance for me has been different but I have still had a lot of fun along the way. In return for my sacrifice of working I will be retired before 55 and playing full time, while living very well. It helps a lot (financially, that is) to not have kids. That would change everything.

I don't get people like my father that won't spend a dime on anything - have to save every penny you can, even now that he's secure and doesn't need to. It's a terrible shame to go through life missing out on the good parts (what are you living for then?) but it isn't too attractive to be poor and starving in retirement either. Gotta find the balance.
post #48 of 58

Asking the question but knowing the answer

Hey what answer do you expect from the majority here in this forum "Now now, don't overdo it - be sensible and save for your retirement"?
post #49 of 58
Got an email about a VP in our Company. He finally retired 2 yrs ago--If I had to guess he was 65ish. 40+ yr with the Company. He died yesterday. Bet his wife and children wished they took more vacations.


GO and enjoy.....
post #50 of 58
yeah, i would cut the trip down some and save 1/2 for retirement, passing on to kids. living it out in a nursing home for 10 years is pretty depressing.

but theyre are plenty that drop just as much money on watching sports, cars, big houses, gambling. so, do what makes you happy.

i believe everyone is only here once. no reason not to enjoy some of it. you spend enough of it working so that you can enjoy it. be a shame to have it cut short before you try to enjoy it.
post #51 of 58
My father treated the whole family of 13 to a trip to Bermuda this past summer for his 75th. All grown up now, it was a very memorable trip for everyone, something we may never be able to do again due to us all getting on in years and being separated by countries and oceans. I used to reflect on our vacations in Scarborough, RI. as a kid, but know I have new memories to work with!

Thanks to the generosity of Dad and his financial prudence, he is in a position today to travel the world, and he has the good health and wherewithal to be able to do so. They just came to the states last week and are in Ireland today. Not a bad way to spend the golden years!

Though it is important to have fun and live life, you also have to plan for the future. And I can tell you that at 41 years old I appreciate that Bermuda trip far more than any other trip as a teen. That is what life is about in the end – family! So, spend some now but save some for later and do it all over again.
post #52 of 58
Quote from Darrell Royal, Texas Longhorn coach...

"What I gave I kept, what I kept I lost."

I regret not taking my kids (11/14) until this year, but we're going every year until I can't anymore...to catch up! As long as the kids appreciate it and pass it along to their kids, a great legacy to start if your parents didn't have the money or time.
post #53 of 58
ALEX65,

The commercial has it right, and you do too. The ski trip may have a High Price but that time you're sending with the family is "PRICELESS".
post #54 of 58
Quote:
Originally Posted by steveturner View Post
ALEX65,

The commercial has it right, and you do too. The ski trip may have a High Price but that time you're sending with the family is "PRICELESS".
^^^^^^^^^^^
This is the essence of the original topic.

This forum is reserved for topics related to skiing. We value all posts and did not delete any that were here, a new thread was started with those posts in the supporter lounge HERE. We would like to invite any members to become supporters so they can engage in off-topic conversations.
post #55 of 58
So somebody got rid of Mrs Thatcher and co. (She was here yesterday).

Well done that man !
post #56 of 58
Read my tagline.

I'm 51. My health is failing from things pretty much beyond my control (MS, for one), and dammit, I'm not done 'doing' yet. I don't have enough time to do all I want.

Before I was diagnosed, I thought I had all the time in the world to do whatever I wanted. I was healthy, athletic, energetic.......a dynamo. When I was 38, I started skiing. I loved it. I was poor, but I went anyway. As I got older, I got better, but now I feel I'm going backward. The thought of not being able to ski anything bigger than a blue groomed is looming larger this year.

I don't even walk very well anymore.

Jam every day full of things you love to do, because there are no guarantees you'll do those things next year.
post #57 of 58
Stay strong Bonni. There will be great runs for you this year. I hope our paths can cross (preferably in Tahoe) so we can ski together sometime. It won't bother me to wait, or if the shoe should happen to be on the other foot; perhaps you'll wait on me.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bonni View Post
Read my tagline.

I'm 51. My health is failing from things pretty much beyond my control (MS, for one), and dammit, I'm not done 'doing' yet. I don't have enough time to do all I want.

Before I was diagnosed, I thought I had all the time in the world to do whatever I wanted. I was healthy, athletic, energetic.......a dynamo. When I was 38, I started skiing. I loved it. I was poor, but I went anyway. As I got older, I got better, but now I feel I'm going backward. The thought of not being able to ski anything bigger than a blue groomed is looming larger this year.

I don't even walk very well anymore.

Jam every day full of things you love to do, because there are no guarantees you'll do those things next year.
post #58 of 58
strength to you Bonni! You've got a great attitude, and from what I understand that can't hurt.
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