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Are wider ski's better?

post #1 of 16
Thread Starter 
I'm taking my seven year old daughter skiing this year. She went for one lesson last year , but had problems with her boot fit.(wide feet, big calf) I found boots to fit her feet last week so she should be o.k. on the boot part.
My question is: Are wider ski's better for a young beginner? I bought her a pair of Soloman crosmax groms last year and was planing on her using them this year untill I noticed how wide and deep the sidecuts looked on the lease ski's in the shop. Will the wider ski's help her progress faster?
post #2 of 16
In my opinion wider is better for beginner children. They are not all that good at controlling thier edges and the wider ski wants to be flat. This means they will have to deliberately put the ski on edge.
post #3 of 16
How wide and what conditions?

I think you're going to get some disagreement on this one. Personally while a "wide" ski forces more deliberate edging, it may also be too much for the child, holding them back from progressing.
post #4 of 16
Agreed. It's kind of like the debate on whether or not it's better to start off on a diamond. On the one hand it could force you to ski better, but on the other hand if you really can't ski the slope, you're not going to get any better...just fall down a lot and get frustrated. I would recommend having her learn on short narrow shaped skis so as not to discourage her from the sport all together, and then when she has a stronger stance, throw her on the wider skis.
post #5 of 16
If they get tired or frustrated, then it won't be fun for them. Go with the ski recommended by the school or instructors. They should know best. call ahead and ask to speak with someone who deals with little kids.
post #6 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by dmon View Post
...... noticed how wide and deep the sidecuts looked on the lease ski's in the shop. Will the wider ski's help her progress faster?
Not sure if i can picture what you mean. Are the skis wide under foot? Or just in the tip and tail?

I have had more luck in my kids beginner classes with a shorter and shapelier ski. A narrower (underfoot) ski with lots of shape will respond more quickly when she tips and turns it. This will allow her to control speed through turn shape
post #7 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by cabrown317 View Post
Agreed. It's kind of like the debate on whether or not it's better to start off on a diamond........
Is this even really debated anywhere:?
It is a perfect plan to become a defensive skier, or worse
post #8 of 16
Thread Starter 
I looked up the side cut, her ski's are. 90-63-80 The ski's I believe I saw at the shop are 103-65-90. Not that much of a diifferance but they looked much bigger at the tip and tail. One more question. Ski height, her ski's go up half way between mid chest and her chin (100cm). If I go up to a 110cm they go up to her mouth. She's 50 inches, 85 pounds. I'm trying to make things as easy as possible for her. I'm 39 so when I learned it was top of my head with ski's then I worked up to some 205's then went down to 180 when the K2 four came out. Now I'm down to a 170 (I'm 5'10"). I'm old school so I'm confused about the modern day beginer.
Thanks for your input, Dan
post #9 of 16
dmon-

If money is no object, get the shapelier ones in a 100. Going shorter will set your daughter up for success and the shapelier skis will give her more positive feedback.

If you don't want to spend the scratch, her old ones will be fine.

HTH
John
post #10 of 16
I teach predominantly children her age. We generally size children up to about the chest in height.
post #11 of 16
I have three kids, all under age 10. In my unprofessional opinion, when they're just starting out, length is important, and sidecut rarely matters. They're not going to start out carving turns unless they're that Bridger kid.

I started paying attention to the shape of their skis this past season, when they had all demonstrated proficiency carving intermediate trails and could handle black diamonds competently. They now each have a quiver of two -- a pair of fatter twins with less sidecut, and a pair of narrower, more shaped skis.
post #12 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by dmon View Post
I looked up the side cut, her ski's are. 90-63-80 The ski's I believe I saw at the shop are 103-65-90. Not that much of a diifferance but they looked much bigger at the tip and tail. One more question. Ski height, her ski's go up half way between mid chest and her chin (100cm). If I go up to a 110cm they go up to her mouth. She's 50 inches, 85 pounds. I'm trying to make things as easy as possible for her. I'm 39 so when I learned it was top of my head with ski's then I worked up to some 205's then went down to 180 when the K2 four came out. Now I'm down to a 170 (I'm 5'10"). I'm old school so I'm confused about the modern day beginer.
Thanks for your input, Dan
Great to see the definition of "wide" was resolved. Even though on "paper" the dimensions don't look to be that different, the skis will react differently the more edge she begins to get. 10mm+ is quite a bit at tip and tail when the ski waist changes little. The shapelier ski is "more ski" at the same length, so be conservative on length if you go with more shape. Chest high sounds good as others have said.

The key to whether she can use the sidecut will be if she can "bend" the ski. An easy way to tell is to put 2 small 2x4 blocks on the floor (4" side down)- one under the tip and the other under the tail. Have her stand on the middle of the ski. If her body weight doesn't make the middle of the ski touch the floor (or close to it), she won't get the full benefit of the ski as she progresses. A "soft ski" is a good thing at the start.

Before you buy new skis, maybe demo a pair that you're interested in and see which she prefers. She may or may not notice any difference in the beginning.

Cool ... another snow sports enthusiast is born!!
post #13 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by medmarkco View Post
Great to see the definition of "wide" was resolved.
Actually kids' skis can get quite a bit wider than that. Case in point being these - http://www.rossignol.com/index.php?&...it_detail.html

Even with the wider waist, you still get a pretty small turn radius 5m in the case of the 67 cm ski and of course, more in the other other sizes (8m in the 80cm if memory serves). Anyway, I've spent many days at the magic carpet watching small kids wobble around as they learn to ski and I am hee to tell ou that for a true beginner, the wider ski does make a difference. When the child progresses to where they want to put the ski on edge it will not hinder tham, but it will help them to get through the early days where they can barely stand up. If you ask me, that could make the difference between them liking the sport or giving it up.
post #14 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by epic View Post
Actually kids' skis can get quite a bit wider than that. Case in point being these - [rossi link].
Wasn't trying to discredit your comments about wider waisted youth skis. Just that there would be disagreement. Sounds like the question was really about more shapely skis than "wide" skis - as in fat.

There are obviously differing opinions and an argument for both - my personal choice for an average 7yo (not knowing all the circumstances) would be a 70mm waisted ski or less. I was just hoping the discussion wasn't leading to a 90mm+ learning ski for a 7yo on hardpack.
post #15 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by medmarkco View Post
I was just hoping the discussion wasn't leading to a 90mm+ learning ski for a 7yo on hardpack.
I don't think there is such a thing, but I'll bet there'd be a market for it if there was. Shouldn't 7 y.o.s have quivers too?
post #16 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by dmon View Post
I'm taking my seven year old daughter skiing this year. She went for one lesson last year , but had problems with her boot fit.(wide feet, big calf) I found boots to fit her feet last week so she should be o.k. on the boot part.
My question is: Are wider ski's better for a young beginner? I bought her a pair of Soloman crosmax groms last year and was planing on her using them this year untill I noticed how wide and deep the sidecuts looked on the lease ski's in the shop. Will the wider ski's help her progress faster?
dmon; I hope you are going thru a season lease program that includes boots and skis because if you just got her boots last week she might well grow out of them by January, if they are a rental lease shop like what I have been using as she grows they will change out boots to fit properly( went thru 3 pairs last year with my 10 y.o.). I don't think you need to worry so much about ski shape or width, if the shop is leasing out anything modern i.e last 3-4 years she will be on decent stuff. Put the money into ski time and lessons, trying to get out in the most favorable conditions possible to keep her out skiing as much as possible. As others have said don't go too long on the ski, she will get more mileage working a shorter ski to its max than struggling with a longer ski. Another thing with boots, make sure she just has one thin sock on the foot and nothing else tucked into boot like pants, leggings etc. Kids get a lot od discomfort by all the stuff they got crammed into there boots. The boot fit will be the key to her wanting to stay out longer from a pain perspective. Next step is her having fun and enjoying skiing whether its free skiing or in lessons.Good luck and have fun skiing with her.
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