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yet another ma request

post #1 of 16
Thread Starter 
alright i don't have a video, only 3 pictures, but i imagine you guys can give me some tips, i ski about 12 days a year, but i am very athletic and am constantly doing things and working out to improve my skiing, as well as reading up on how to make myself better... if i could i'd live in colorado and ski 60 days a year, and i might when i get to grad school!

so anyways in my quest to do everyhting better i want you guys to tell me what to do here... i am really getting into this BC stuff, and all around freeriding. this is the south bowl at keystone... those of you who have been there i started at the top of the first hill with the med equipment on it and skied to the right side of the bowl and hit a small jump of the edge of the ridge which was about a 6' drop plus the jump.

that went on incredibly too long so ... ugliness at its finest...





not bottom center of this picture...
post #2 of 16
Keep your hands forward, in front of you where you can see them.
post #3 of 16
post #4 of 16
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Phil Pugliese View Post
Keep your hands forward, in front of you where you can see them.

i have been told that by someone else... i imagine it has to do with keeping parallel with the fall line? keep the weight over the skis?
post #5 of 16
Yep, reaching forward and down the hill keeps you forward and moving down the hill.
post #6 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by Phil Pugliese View Post
Keep your hands forward, in front of you where you can see them.
Quote:
Originally Posted by brice618 View Post
i have been told that by someone else... i imagine it has to do with keeping parallel with the fall line? keep the weight over the skis?

Note the hand and ski position.
post #7 of 16
ah ha - so Phil ... when my instructor was saying tips leave last and land first he REALLY meant it?
post #8 of 16
Well, um, ... nice photographs, Brice!

I know the spot well, and I think you did everything right--including the rule to never do something like that unless there's a camera rolling! If anyone's not convinced about just how deep blue our Rocky Mountain sky can get, check out that first picture.

When you go big, things go wrong sometimes. Doesn't mean you made a mistake, necessarily, at least not one that needs conscious correction. Go back up and try again!

The recommendation to keep your hands in front of you is good advice. I might suggest focusing more on keeping your elbows in front of you, just to make sure there's no misinterpretation, but it's basically the same thing.

We don't see your landing here, but just a reminder to keep your skis pointed the direction you're going when you land in stuff like this. It's tempting to try to get them sideways, to check your speed immediately upon landing, but that's a good way to just end up tripping yourself and . . . well, it's possible! I'm guessing that that is exactly what happened, from the hand movements from the first to the second frames. Looks like you were rotating your upper body as you came of the lip, in an attempt to get 'em sideways. I could be wrong.

Give me a shout next time you're in Keystone!

Best regards,
Bob Barnes
post #9 of 16
And just one more little thing, to agree with all those above: if you take off with your hips that far back, and your legs already quite bent (flexed), you can end up staying back through the air and the landing is on your heels (followed by your bum!).

Maybe experiment with this on some small kickers, but you want to be pushing the hands/elbows forward at takeoff but also, *raising the hips*. As you come down to land, you will be more centered, and you'll have plenty of length to start crumpling the legs to absorb the landing.
post #10 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by ant View Post
And just one more little thing, to agree with all those above: if you take off with your hips that far back, and your legs already quite bent (flexed), you can end up staying back through the air and the landing is on your heels (followed by your bum!).

Maybe experiment with this on some small kickers, but you want to be pushing the hands/elbows forward at takeoff but also, *raising the hips*. As you come down to land, you will be more centered, and you'll have plenty of length to start crumpling the legs to absorb the landing.

yeah - that instructor that we both know - the one that skis same on old skis as newer ones - had me learn to jump and "land soft" on flat... then on small kickers.... Must get back for next steps.... he was good at making the steps small and managable for me.... Unlike the big chunky one that always wanted me to go off something HE thought was small... and then wondered why I refused to jump with him...
post #11 of 16
Thread Starter 
Thanks for the helpful tips guys! Bob, thats the theory i apply to... you can't prove it happened if you don't have pictures of it (and this year i'll have even better ones since i got a digital slr!!!) but also to the theory of keeping trying. i can land medium sized kickers all day with air as big as that if not larger, but out in the real world it just seems to be a little different story. I'll definately work to keep the elbows and arms forward to help keep over the skis.

ps i'm trying to work out a trip to keystone/ vail/ a-basin. for 10 days in the first week of the christmas break, and maybe a 5 day trip on the last week of the break so something like december 14th to 24th and like jan 3 to 8th. i'll be sure to let you know when i get up there.
post #12 of 16
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by ant View Post
And just one more little thing, to agree with all those above: if you take off with your hips that far back, and your legs already quite bent (flexed), you can end up staying back through the air and the landing is on your heels (followed by your bum!).

Maybe experiment with this on some small kickers, but you want to be pushing the hands/elbows forward at takeoff but also, *raising the hips*. As you come down to land, you will be more centered, and you'll have plenty of length to start crumpling the legs to absorb the landing.

what kind of drill could i use to get the raising of the hips (not sure i see how to do that)
post #13 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by brice618 View Post
what kind of drill could i use to get the raising of the hips (not sure i see how to do that)
Hmmm - I know an Italian instructor who fin ally got through to me when no-one else could.... but I'm not sure i could even really explain how.... I think he may have been sneaky..... I'm going back this season to try to get more idea how I did it...
post #14 of 16
Well, it's hard to be precise on the InterWeb thingy, but imagine you're superman, taking off as you launch. You're going UP and OUT. Not bending over (you'll hit your nose on your skis and do a somersault), but launching your whole body up, but forward-up. So the hips are coming forward, your hands and arms are reaching foward. Imagine some rope going from your hands to your hips: the hands are pulling the hips forward as they go.

If anything gets left behind, it'll pull you backward. But if you are going forward *with* the skis as they leave the snow, then you are set up to control everything that happens next. But play with it on some small stuff first, then see if it improves your control on the backcountry stuff.
post #15 of 16
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by ant View Post
Well, it's hard to be precise on the InterWeb thingy, but imagine you're superman, taking off as you launch. You're going UP and OUT. Not bending over (you'll hit your nose on your skis and do a somersault), but launching your whole body up, but forward-up. So the hips are coming forward, your hands and arms are reaching foward. Imagine some rope going from your hands to your hips: the hands are pulling the hips forward as they go.

If anything gets left behind, it'll pull you backward. But if you are going forward *with* the skis as they leave the snow, then you are set up to control everything that happens next. But play with it on some small stuff first, then see if it improves your control on the backcountry stuff.

honestly that sounds like the same form a long jumper would use (although i'm sure its much more techinical but thats what i am imagining in my head)... but i think i get the idea, just to keep myself from sitting back and washing out the landings. it makes good sense, just a matter of trying to not over do it.
post #16 of 16
Zackly! How you take off will dictate how you land. Once your takeoffs and landings are solid, your air form will really improve.
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