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Brushes - Stainless or Bronze?

post #1 of 21
Thread Starter 
Alright, so it's time to get cracking and I promised I would do a better job this year. I understand the sharpening - now on to the important part - - - brushes?

Specifically, what is/are the best starting brush(es) here in Colorado for a guy without a large budget? Am I crazy, or is this the kind of thing I can find from the Fuller salesman?

Which way to go?
http://www.ski-racing.com/brush_sys.html
http://www.ski-racing.com/bst_brushes.html
post #2 of 21
Go soft/stiff, mixup with metals... Stiff Stainless/ soft bronze...
Add a Horsehair... go oval, they work with more widths easily.
post #3 of 21
If you are going to buy only one brush buy a bronze one. They are good before you wax, after you scrape, and for breaking in new grinds. I'm a fan of the oval Holmenkol one personally. The stainless ones are sweet, but are a tad more specialized in my opinion. I have quite a few brushes and would say that I use a bronze brush 60% of the time, a stainless one 25% of the time with the others taking up the last 15%.
Have fun.
post #4 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by bennyr View Post
If you are going to buy only one brush buy a bronze one. They are good before you wax, after you scrape, and for breaking in new grinds. I'm a fan of the oval Holmenkol one personally. The stainless ones are sweet, but are a tad more specialized in my opinion. I have quite a few brushes and would say that I use a bronze brush 60% of the time, a stainless one 25% of the time with the others taking up the last 15%. Have fun.
post #5 of 21
I don't like the idea of using the same brush for cleaning out the old wax and restoring the structure as for after scraping. You should have a dedicated brush for each purpose. A steel brush is great for cleaning out the old wax, or as bennyr said a bronze one.

For post wax I like using the scraper than a bronze brush. It gets a ton of the wax out that the scraper doesn't get.

Then I use a horsehair brush. I used to do more steps (nylon brushs between the two, softer nylon after the horsehair), but I like this combination of only two the best. (I'm not racing.)

Finally finish with base tex if you want a nice shine.

Another good thing to do is to have a cheap clean paint brush the size of a ski, and run it down the base between each step to clean off loose wax particles.
post #6 of 21
post #7 of 21
Jeez...you guys are tech nerds. I grabbed the fingernail brush out of the shower. Cleans the wax out pretty good.
post #8 of 21
I am here to post in this very important thread. Thank you.
post #9 of 21
Steel very aggressive, good to get the old wax out and or to touch up the base structure. Artechski, has brushes at very good prices.
post #10 of 21
Yes I love artech, great prices, small family owned. was going to put up that link instead, but the hand brushes pages are blank, must be working on the site.

http://www.artechski.com
post #11 of 21
Unless you're planning on racing, then why brush? Seriously.. All you are doing is reducing the amount of time your wax job lasts. The action of the snow will help deburr, align your structure and clean out old wax, so really there's no need.

The best thing you can do is spend the $100 that you would on a couple brushes on a sidewall scriber instead, and learn to sharpen your edges properly. That's going to make a bigger difference in your skiing and the condition of your skis than any brushes will.

However, if you're dedicated to getting brushes, then get a stiff nylon / brass half-n-half combo for pre and post waxing, and a horsehair for polishing. That's all you need.
post #12 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by SkiMangoJazz View Post
I don't like the idea of using the same brush for cleaning out the old wax and restoring the structure as for after scraping. You should have a dedicated brush for each purpose. A steel brush is great for cleaning out the old wax, or as bennyr said a bronze one......
Another good thing to do is to have a cheap clean paint brush the size of a ski, and run it down the base between each step to clean off loose wax particles.
Briskly rubbing the handle of the paintbrush across the brush gets all the old wax out of the bristles before re-using the brush.
post #13 of 21

Yep, all the toys...

...do cost a bunch, but if you want to optimize ski performance, and/or do it easier, and/or have a ton of skis to work on, the investment is worth it.

I got into rotobrushes last year, and I also built a hot box. See the following:

http://www.rmmskiracing.org/articles...ning-Part2.pdf

http://www.rmmskiracing.org/articles...-03-Hotbox.pdf


http://www.rmmskiracing.org/articles...tbox-Part2.pdf
post #14 of 21
Man, I love to hot box.
post #15 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by SkiRacer55 View Post
...do cost a bunch, but if you want to optimize ski performance, and/or do it easier, and/or have a ton of skis to work on, the investment is worth it.

I got into rotobrushes last year, and I also built a hot box. See the following:

http://www.rmmskiracing.org/articles...ning-Part2.pdf

http://www.rmmskiracing.org/articles...-03-Hotbox.pdf


http://www.rmmskiracing.org/articles...tbox-Part2.pdf
Thats my new project, (as if I need any more!). Hwo long do you keep the skis in the hotbox?
Currently my skis race and non are sitting in their bags next to the water heater with a heavy coat of wax.

Great write ups btw.
post #16 of 21

Thanks...

Quote:
Originally Posted by XJguy View Post
Thats my new project, (as if I need any more!). Hwo long do you keep the skis in the hotbox?
Currently my skis race and non are sitting in their bags next to the water heater with a heavy coat of wax.

Great write ups btw.
...I do them at 120 degrees for 3 hours. The Toko site says use their bag at 60 celsius (140 farenheit) for 3 hours. In other words, my temp is a little low according to their stats. 140 makes me a little nervous, though. Empirically, as I say in the article, I found 100 farenheit wasn't doing anything, and so I split the difference between that and 140, came up with 120 for 3 hours, and I've been happy with the results. The Toko info:

http://www.tokous.com/thermo_bag.htm

Building a hot box is pretty straightforward, it just takes time. All the details, such as but not limited to the insulation, are critical, so don't take shortcuts and you'll be amazed at the results.
post #17 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by Powderhoundin View Post
Unless you're planning on racing, then why brush? Seriously.. All you are doing is reducing the amount of time your wax job lasts. The action of the snow will help deburr, align your structure and clean out old wax, so really there's no need.
On a powder day, you might be waiting awhile for the wax to clear out. In a short time you can free the structure, polish the bases and be ready for optimal turns in fresh powder. It does make a positive difference.

Roto-brushes save tons of time and effort, especially if you have a family and a fleet of boards. Having a 'quiver' of brushes that you keep clean, whether roto or manual is your best option.
post #18 of 21
I figure that since the grill is put up for the season that I might as well get double duty out of that grill cleaning brush. The wax jobs look a little sketchy beginning of winter what with burned up, dryed out hunks of burger and chicken but that eventually wares off. Middle to end of winter everythings good. Yeah the steaks do taste a little funky in the spring but what the heck the brush is brass. Pick one up at Lowes cheap.
post #19 of 21
(Wally, just make sure you didn't brush flouro wax before your next BBQ. I BBQ year round so I need separate brushes. )

A few other points on brushes and wax in general:
-While waxing, the objective is to get the wax in the ski or snowboard base, not on the base. More wax does not mean better performance and longer durability. Harder, thinner layers of wax does. Brushing removes the excess the scraper cannot.
-Warmer/hotter waxes are softer than colder waxes, requiring different bristle hardnesses.
-Hard brass and steel brushes not only free the structure, but can be use re-establish structure in the base.
-The warmer and the more moist the snow is the deeper the structure should be to minimize the suction created between the base and snow. Adding more wax to have a mirror finish can be very counter-productive.
-To tell the difference between a hard or soft brush of a given material is a function of it's bristle length. The longer bristle the bristle, the softer the brush.
-Tip: by placing fiberlene or lint free shop towels between the iron and base, you can reduce scraping and possible brushing, by drawing out excess while moving down the base; especially for harder waxes.
post #20 of 21
Excellent post Alpinord - thanks!
post #21 of 21
Your welcome. Hope it helps people understand what you are trying to achieve to maximize your glide and performance with the least effort and time. For more info: wax application or download the catalog for PDF version.
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