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New Passport Regulations for Canada/US Travel - Page 2

post #31 of 50
Thread Starter 
Quote:
I don't think this is a change in the law more a decision to enforce it.
Yes it is. Previously you could fly to Canada with only a birth certificate or naturalization papers to prove US citizenship when reentering the US. I have ski buddies that have flown to where the snow is in Canada on the spur of the moment & they don't have passports. They will be surprised this year if they try that.
post #32 of 50
I don't understand the resistance to having a passport. I'd rather cary a passport than the original copy of my birth certificate. I guess thats just me.
post #33 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by trekchick View Post
The question of the day:

Will the Passport requirement inhibit ski travel between USA and Canada?


(I noticed, no one cares about the need for a passport to go to Mexico)
I'm still waiting for an answer to this question.:
post #34 of 50
Mine is expired this year. I should get the renewal going. Keep in mind that if you want to travel and don't have a passport, it can take a long time to get processed. Whether its skiing in Canada or Europe or job related. I think Europeans are amazed at how many Americans have never applied for a passport. Kind of essential equipment for living in most other countries.

Why the reisistance?


[note the use of the word skiing above. I've been told things need to be topical in this forum ]
post #35 of 50
It is substantially more expensive for a person in the US to take a trip (expecially for a quick vacation) to anywhere overseas than it is for someone in Europe to take a quick train ride to the next country over. That being said, it is much cheaper to travel to Mexico, Canada, the Domincan Republic, Bermuda, etc. from the US so these types of vacations were, at least in my experience, easier to take. Because these destinations USED TO require only a birth certificate, many US citizens opted not to go through the trouble to get a passport. I don't think there is a resistance to having one, but just a thought that "why have one if I don't need one" mentality. Obviously more people will now realize that it may be worthwhile to get one.
post #36 of 50
As someone who drives from Seattle to Vancouver or Whistler on a near weekly basis I will tell you it is a crap shoot if you get asked for ID or not, either way I personally think it would be very stupid NOT to travel with a passport and/or birth certificate.

I use a variety of cars and no one car seems to draw more or less questions....I will say that the border crossing just north of Lynden, Washington always seems to ask the fewist questions, the downside to this route from Seattle is that Trans-Canada One can be very slow just before crossing the Fraser.

I keep an expired passport in my car at all times, customs seems to be happy with this.

And remember, guns. mace and DUI's are huge no-no's in Canada and you probably will get turned back....
post #37 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wear The Fox Hat View Post
If you are crossing an international border, you should have a passport with you. If you don't want to carry a passport, don't leave your country.
This is pretty simple.

Mod Hat on: Lets keep this to U.S./Canada ski related conversation if NOT it will get moved to Politics and Hot topics.
post #38 of 50
FYI,

Season before last I drove across with my 11-year old son and was grilled pretty hard by the border guard on my way into CAN because I did not have a letter from his mother saying I could bring him. Guess they thought I was smuggling the kid out of the country. I had to show them my reservation at MT Tremblant before they would let us through. I had my passport and his birth certificate.
post #39 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by trekchick View Post
I'm still waiting for an answer to this question.:
Some people seem to think it will affect all things that require crossing the border (including skiing). Rep. John Mchugh (R-NY) has proposed a delay in the requirement to do a study. IIRC, the original requirement for the passport was Jan 1, 2007 and not 2008 until he and some other Congressional colleagues delayed it. McHugh represents Northern New York (Ogdensburg & Massena have border crossings) and the economy up there already has 9 toes in the grave...
post #40 of 50

And speaking of Passports

Interesting piece in today's Washington Post

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn...091500923.html

As per the Moderator's request I shall refrain from comments!:
post #41 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wear The Fox Hat View Post
If you are crossing an international border, you should have a passport with you. If you don't want to carry a passport, don't leave your country.
I guess that rules out the Schengen zone within the EU, eh?

Oh right the UK didn't sign onto Schengen so UK subjects must have a passport to cross any international borders, unlike the less restrictive part of Europe. But US citizens never did for Canada (or other North American & most Caribbean countries) until now, nor did Canadians for the US.

Just making a parallel case to point out that it's not only us backwards 'mericans who used to think that crossing into neighboring countries should be allowable without the full-blown international documentation. The real core, Euro-zone, one-europe part of the EU also allows it. But not the UK.

Of course you can cross from England into Scotland without a passport, and Scotland ought to be considered fully a separate country if we could get HRH and Westminster to give it back all the way. (In which case I could probably get a Scots/EU passport the way people with documented Irish descent can get an Eire/EU passport today. Darn it all.)

In the past I've gone to Canada, Mexico and Bahamas without a US Passport. Ever since I've had one, I've used it instead, but considering the length of our "friendly" borders and the shared community and metro areas between US and Canada, this is going to be a mindset change and an economic impact on thousands of folks. Not the people who can afford to ski in Whistler or Banff or Tremblant, but the folks in the small towns that have traditionally been just one "community" crossing the border. Anybody who can afford ski trips can definitely afford the passport charges. Which then gives them the option to bag those great deals that show up from time to time for skiing overseas or opposite hemisphere winter, etc. Think of it as a skiing investment!
post #42 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rio View Post
madmanmlh -

You won't need a passport to drive to Canada this winter but you will need to carry a birth certificate to prove citizenship when reentering the US. A driver's license isn't enough proof anymore.
To be accurate, a driver's license was never enough legal proof for entering Canada or re-entering the US. In practice it often was, but the real requirement was "Proof of Identity" which the driver's license provided, PLUS "Proof of Citizenship" which the license never provided. The certified copy of a birth certificate was typically what was used as Proof of Citizenship. Anybody who expected to cross the US/Canada border in either direction with only a driver's license was misguided to try, and lucky if they succeeded.
post #43 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by MarkXS View Post
...Anybody who expected to cross the US/Canada border in either direction with only a driver's license was misguided to try, and lucky if they succeeded.
I don't think that's quite accurate. I lived in Buffalo for 17 years exactly 5 miles from the Peace Bridge and into Canada. Granted this was quite a few years back but we made hundreds of trips over the years into Canada, mostly to go to the beaches on Lake Erie and bring back a case of
>>>

and get some>>>


and to smuggle back some"real" Canadian Bacon
>>> .

A driver's license was the most that was ever required along with answers to "Where were you born; Where are you going; How long are you going to be here; and what are you bringing into the country?"

No luck was ever involved until very recently. The passports should cut down on all the bacon smuggling though. The real stuff is like hooved crack, as you Canucks already know.
post #44 of 50

Passports

As Jstraw says its all a biggg Orwellian conspiracy. The entire rest of the world needs a passport to travel from one country to another - So get a passport! That is unless you're crossing the texas deserts or the Rio Grande - then you don't need anything.
post #45 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by madmanmlh View Post
i have heard rumors here at school that you will even need a passport to drive into canada and back. A normal drivers liscense used to be enough.
I dont know when it goes into effect
You won't need a Passport to drive to Canada, just one when you'll want to enter or re-enter the US.
post #46 of 50
AGAIN..KEEP IS SKI RELATED OR IT GETS MOVED. DON'T MAKE ME STOP THIS CAR.

Final warning.
post #47 of 50
Sorry, I though it was on-topic (ski related).

No Passport in the future, potential lost in crossborder ski trips.

As someone that cross the border a few times on day trips into NY, Vermont, NH or Maine. I have driven across maybe 8 times this winter on ski trips, I didn't carry a passport or was never asked for one. Mind you, my license plate and driver license are probably on file, especially when I cross the border from October to sometimes June to go skiing.

I taken the plane for 4 ski trips in the US West since June 05, I only carried my expired Passport (since 2003) with me. Not a problem, however I'll make sure it's renewed next time I go. No guarantees that you won't have any problems, but I didn't.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Pete No. Idaho View Post
The entire rest of the world needs a passport to travel from one country to another.
Recall crossing with people from France into Switzerland or Italy. There weren't carrying a passport.

On a more serious note, ski areas in Southern Quebec (mainly Eastern Townships areas like Sutton or Orford, but also Tremblant) and Northern Vermont (especially Jay) are very worried how this is going to affect them.

Canadian ski areas are especially worried with the combine effect of the increase value of the Canadian dollars.

Quebec premier and Vermont Governor are also worry about the effect, not only to the ski industry.

News wire from Canadian Press:

http://ca.news.yahoo.com/s/15092006/...-measures.html
post #48 of 50
The passport requirement has been major news in Canada for about a year now, largely because of the small percentage of Americans who currently have passports, and the likely effect on the Canadian tourism industry (including skiing) of requiring the documents. It will have an impact if and when it comes into effect. Interesting to note that obviously the Canadian (and border state) lobbying on this requirement hasn't penetrated very deeply into people's awareness yet. An alternative ID card has been suggested to avoid having to get a passport (for Americans), but as comments in this thread have indicated it's a tough sell.

On the other hand the demographics of American citizens who have passports, probably match the demographics of skiers pretty well (more affluent). For a family that doesn't have passports and is unlikely to travel outside of the U.S./Canada, the addition three or four hundred bucks on to the cost of a ski-trip to Canada might be a real barrier. (I'm assuming that Canadian skiers who frequent the U.S. have learned long ago that it is just easier with a passport, despite the fact that it is more expensive for us to get one.)

As far as Europe goes, the airports have two lines: one for EU citizens (just walk through) and one for non-EU citizens (show passport for perfunctory inspection and stamp and then you are on your way). The land borders between the EU member states no longer have controls or passport checks even for non-EU citizens (at least the last time we drove extensively on the continent). I believe there are still passport controls on the ferry traffic between Britain and the rest of the EU, but Britain seems to be moving in another direction from most the EU on a number of fronts. In the current climate, the prospect of skiing across the border between Canada and the U.S. is a non-starter (even if there were ski hills that close geographically).

If you plan on coming up here to ski in the next couple of years, you might want to make your plans for 2006/2007 rather than waiting. What with the proposal to send thousands of national guardsmen and some blackhawk helicopters to patrol the border, it looks like it will only get more difficult in the future. Canadian ski hills will probably have to make even more of an effort to market themselves in Europe to compensate.
post #49 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by gnjantzie View Post
The passport requirement has been major news in Canada for about a year now, largely because of the small percentage of Americans who currently have passports, and the likely effect on the Canadian tourism industry (including skiing) of requiring the documents. It will have an impact if and when it comes into effect. Interesting to note that obviously the Canadian (and border state) lobbying on this requirement hasn't penetrated very deeply into people's awareness yet. An alternative ID card has been suggested to avoid having to get a passport (for Americans), but as comments in this thread have indicated it's a tough sell.
(...)
On the other hand the demographics of American citizens who have passports, probably match the demographics of skiers pretty well (more affluent). For a family that doesn't have passports and is unlikely to travel outside of the U.S./Canada, the addition three or four hundred bucks on to the cost of a ski-trip to Canada might be a real barrier. (I'm assuming that Canadian skiers who frequent the U.S. have learned long ago that it is just easier with a passport, despite the fact that it is more expensive for us to get one.).
I might be mistaken, but I would think that Western Ski areas along the Canada-US border are less dependent to the crossborder driving than in the East.

This discussion on this topic was on firsttracksonline and also zoneski last year. If I recall, the concern on FTO wasn't that great, mind you most of the participants aren't specifically from one region of the country, however on zoneski which is a Quebec based ski forum, the concerns was must greater. Although few skiers on the forum would say it would affect them, but they could see the issue and difficulties and some of them wouldn't bother getting a passport and would stay in Quebec or go to Western Canada.

If were talking about a potential big loser here, I would say it would be Jay Peak (Vermont). It's only 5 minutes from the border and only 90 minutes from Montreal. It's biggest market and most of it's clientele come from Quebec.

I used to do day trip as a teenaged kids to Jay or Smuggs (in the 80s, there were daily buses for those two areas leaving from Montreal). I wouldn't have owns a passport just to go skiing then and I thought it would be the case now. A non-travelling family with 2-3 kids wouldn't necessarily bother to get each a passport just to head to Vermont.

As mentioned by gnjantzie, this is huge issue in Canada, but also in the bordering states where the integration of the areas and the economies are the greatest. There some Vermont-Quebec town where the border actually goes through home or library. "Sorry, you cannot go to that section of the library without your passport".

PS. I have a friend who's a Canadian border official from that area.
post #50 of 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pete No. Idaho View Post
As Jstraw says its all a biggg Orwellian conspiracy. The entire rest of the world needs a passport to travel from one country to another - So get a passport! That is unless you're crossing the texas deserts or the Rio Grande - then you don't need anything.
Yeah, that's just what I said. :
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