or Connect
EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › Ski Gear Discussion › "Special" Single Tip Skis
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

"Special" Single Tip Skis

post #1 of 11
Thread Starter 
I'm looking for a set of single tip (downhill) skis (preferably on the lower price range, but any suggestion will help) that can perform well downhill, but can also handle the impact of jumps (and rails, if possible) of these sizes:



So, I basically looking for a really durable set of downhill skis... no twin tips please!
post #2 of 11
Ummmm. Just about any ski. Jumps beat on a ski a lot less than just normal aggressive skiing would. Any ski is capable of hitting jumps (rails are another story as park specific skis will hold up best since their edges are built with that in mind). What else are you looking for in a ski? i.e what ability level are you, where do you plan on skiing other than in the park? What other skis have you enjoyed in the past?

I have taken my RX9's in the park a fair number of times and have found them to be perfectly adequate. I don't really air it out (20-25 foot gaps) and have never landed fully on the tip or tail or anything but I think they'd hold up as well as anything else in that case. If they can go mach schnell on the groomers why can't they land a few jumps?

Why exactly are you ruling out twintips? If your primary purpose for buying these is park use, why not get a park-specific ski? Sorry for asking more questions instead of answering yours but I feel like we need more information to help you.
post #3 of 11
Thread Starter 
Based on this site, I would say around Intermediate, Advanced on a good day. I do most skiing on the steeper single black trails, I have only used those crappy (can I say that here?) rentals, and am looking for an intermediate, all around ski.

You know what, I think I may reconsider twin tips. Can a trickster here tell me how hard it is to learn how to ride rails like this:



I really want to learn how to ride the terrain park, but I didn't want to dive in and buy twin tips already, any help on the difficulty of learning?
post #4 of 11
at first i was thinking that you might rep these skis, given your screen name:

http://www.libertyskis.com/

post #5 of 11
Thread Starter 
Hmm... never saw those skis (BTW, my name is libertyskier becuase I ski a Liberty Mountain )... Might have to do some research on twin tips...

But like I said, can anyone tell me how hard it is to learn how to ride rails?
post #6 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by libertyskier View Post
Based on this site, I would say around Intermediate, Advanced on a good day. I do most skiing on the steeper single black trails, I have only used those crappy (can I say that here?) rentals, and am looking for an intermediate, all around ski.

You know what, I think I may reconsider twin tips. Can a trickster here tell me how hard it is to learn how to ride rails like this:


I really want to learn how to ride the terrain park, but I didn't want to dive in and buy twin tips already, any help on the difficulty of learning?
That rail, would be rhater advanced, i wont say that i am great at rails, but i can do them. You would start off, sliding boxes, then graduate to mailboxes, then on to flat bar rails, then kinked. that one looks like a C rail, so you would learn C boxes, the C rails. C rails arnt very much harder then regular rails i have found though.

I make it sound harder then it probably is. But in reality, it all varies from person to person. Some people will hit their first rail and clear it, and the same day will go and clear the gnarliest rail in the park, others (kinda like me) will take a season and a half before the whole rail thing "clicks" its all in the balance.
I would invest in a good pair of twins, you can get twins now that will not "go to waste" all mountian, but can hold up in the park. another benefit of twins, is you can ski backwards, and if you mess up, and land backards, or off axis, you havea much better chnce of skiing out, instead of eating it.

Look into some Karmas for all mountain park, public enemies
and for more park, you can get fugatives for cheap. or ther eare many more companies that make twins pick up this months issue of freeskier, they review all the twins.
post #7 of 11
I haven't ridden rails in a couple years (don't want to mangle my edges) but it is a little tricky. I would suggest starting with boxes and getting the feel for balancing and sliding. Then work your way up to small, straight rails and so on.

For your intended use I would consider buying twin tips. Maybe even search around eBay or this site for a pair of used twin tips. The K2 Public Enemies or another all-mountain twin might work well for you. Don't think that just because they are twin tips they won't be good anywhere else.
post #8 of 11
similarly, just because they have twin tips doens't mean they're made for the park/pipe (a lot of companies jumped on the twin tip bandwagon, so just make sure you're getting a park specific ski).

I'd look at
Armada
Line
Head
Dynastar
K2

I own a pair of Karmas, but use 'em as an all mountain and haven't seen many park skiers on them. The brands listed above tend to be more popular with the park heads out here in Tahoe from what I have seen on the lifts and swooshing through the parks on my way back to the lodge/lift line.
post #9 of 11
Thread Starter 
Thanks for all the feedback guys, I really feel like leaning towards twin tips.

Just a quick question since I'm new to the twin tip scene: do they need specific bindings or are most bindings OK?
post #10 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by libertyskier View Post
Thanks for all the feedback guys, I really feel like leaning towards twin tips.

Just a quick question since I'm new to the twin tip scene: do they need specific bindings or are most bindings OK?
for your entry-level, any binding will do. Some park guys may have their favorites, but really not an issue. Just stay away from 10 year old clunkers.

One question? have you ever set foot on a rail? What's driving your desire? yeah, it looks cool, but can also be incredibly fun (and destructive)

you asked previously about any tips on riding them. they're like powder in the sense that they are easier than most beginners assume and most people will teach you strange language on how to learn, language that usually gets you going in the wrong direction. (like lean back in powder or lean forward on a rail) I suggest a weekend freestyle camp. Get your language from the pros. one constant, keep your eye on the end of your line.
post #11 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by libertyskier View Post
Thanks for all the feedback guys, I really feel like leaning towards twin tips.

Just a quick question since I'm new to the twin tip scene: do they need specific bindings or are most bindings OK?
Most are ok, some are better then others. I owuldnt go putting some atomic team racing binders on a park ski. The new 4frnt binding would be the one i would get if i was to get bindings for a park ski, or the Rossi aAxial, the turntable ones. other hten that the salomon s seris is seen alot, or whatever.

And as for rails, it helps alot to ride with someone who skis park. or at lteast watch peopel who can do it. But skiing with someone better then you will help you progess so much better then doing it one your own.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Ski Gear Discussion
EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › Ski Gear Discussion › "Special" Single Tip Skis