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Toughest resort in USA - Page 4

post #91 of 102
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lonnie View Post
You didn't ski the right places then.

For everybody that's saying "East coast, ice" etc. I suggest you try the Hobacks at jackson on a chilly spring AM after a warm afternoon several weeks after the last good snow....

BTW, Jackson gets my vote.

L
Lonnie, your post made me smile and grimmace at the same time. The first run of my first day skiing JH I of course headed to the Hobacks. Spying only 1 set of tracks in the 3 inches of fresh "Powder" I started the run with a smile. About a half hour later I finished with a grimmace after my buddies and I had negotiated 3000 feet of frozen bumps filled with windblown snow.

Lots of frozen bumps in the east, but nowhere will you find 3000 vertical eet of them.
post #92 of 102
They're OK, it's when the troughs hide hack-saw-like bits of granite that you really want to cry.
post #93 of 102
I interpreted the question to mean which area has the largest quantity of expert level terrain, to which I believe Squaw and Jackson are the answer. But I would agree that Lone Peak is more terrifying as much of it has more severe fall consequences.
post #94 of 102
The original question.

"What is the toughest resort in North America and do you think it compares to Europes big guns like Verbier, Argentiere (not size but terrain quality)"
post #95 of 102
Quote:
Originally Posted by BC13 View Post
Lonnie, your post made me smile and grimmace at the same time. The first run of my first day skiing JH I of course headed to the Hobacks. Spying only 1 set of tracks in the 3 inches of fresh "Powder" I started the run with a smile. About a half hour later I finished with a grimmace after my buddies and I had negotiated 3000 feet of frozen bumps filled with windblown snow.

Lots of frozen bumps in the east, but nowhere will you find 3000 vertical eet of them.

Ah yes--but the difference is other than the 1 set of tracks you saw and the efforts of your friends--no one skis icy bumps in the west!! They know that such coonditions are temporary and good times are always one storm right around the corner--where as, in the East-we know Icy Bumps are often all you get all seasonlong so you ski them everytime with enthusiasm and aplomb 'cause what else can you do.

Yeah, of course every western area gets 'bad condition days'--but when us travelers ski on those days (because we're only here for the week and have to make the most of it) you'll notice there ain't a local in sight (they've gone to back country stashes or finally decide it's time to catch up on neglected winter work--only us snow starved eatserners ski that crap.

Being adept at skiing ice is not necessarily a mark of incredible skiing skills-it just demonstrates that you probably ski most often at an area with endemically persistent rotten conditions.

Liam
post #96 of 102
Finally someone mentions Squaw. There's plenty of sick stuff there. I've not skied some of the resorts mentioned though.

As far as East Coast/West Coast. There are great skiers everywhere. Ice skiing, which easterners get more is probably more conducive to racing. You do get ice out west and plenty of complex snow (windblown, layering)- BTDT and when you're expecting really nice stuff on one of your only trips it's a let down.

Out east we tend to get more freeze/thaw and rain over snow so packed powder and soft snow conditions are rarer. There are less steeps and shorter ones although the trails are narrower and more crowded on average if you want to factor that in. MRG, Killington, Stowe and Sugarbush come to mind as having some tough trails.
post #97 of 102
Quote:
Originally Posted by BushwackerinPA View Post
To the people that are saying that altabird doesnt scare you then you my friends are not getting creative enough or are legends in your own mind.

If the toughest stuff at alta/bird doesnt scare you at all...maybe its time to turn pro cause your sure on their level now.
I said something like that But, I'm talking more about the marked runs. W/B has a couple of marked runs I wouldn't touch (maybe if they had good snow - I was there a couple of years ago during the "bad" year). A/B didn't have anything (in my granted limited time) that was marked that was really overly difficult for an advanced/expert skier.
post #98 of 102
Quote:
Originally Posted by skied100 View Post
What is the toughest resort in North America and do you think it compares to Europes big guns like Verbier, Argentiere (not size but terrain quility)

Twist my arm and I'll say Snowbird.

I could be biased since Snowbird taught me to NEVER underestimate the problems that can spring up quickly skiing offpiste on a big mountain. 3 Snowbird taught lessons which I will never forget:

1) Do not follow other skiers tracks with the belief they must lead to a great shortcut. They usually are a short cut but entirely useless to those of us who believe 50 feet of air is strictly for our feathered friends.: 2 years ago the Gad lifts opened late b/c of technical problems depite unbelievable mid December snowpack. The rope to all of the Gad area was dropped on the last day of my trip but the lifts were not running, so you had to ski/hike for your turns. My buddy and I follwed some tracks past the end of Road to Provo that seemed HIGHER than the route most were taking toward the upper Gad area. After quite a hike/ sidestepping journey we lost the tracks as we were perched upon a birds nest style cliff. The tracks led off and down. I never felt so stupid...until #2 below:

2) So that is what they mean by TREEWELL! Once we got over to the trees somewhere off of Black Forest I learned just how wide a trewell can be.:

3) When it is dumping you can inadvertantly get into some really dicey terrain without realizing it. (100 yards on the Cirque traverse can make a BIG difference):
post #99 of 102
Quote:
Originally Posted by ct55 View Post
Out east we tend to get more freeze/thaw and rain over snow so packed powder and soft snow conditions are rarer. There are less steeps and shorter ones although the trails are narrower and more crowded on average if you want to factor that in. MRG, Killington, Stowe and Sugarbush come to mind as having some tough trails.
Nothing too serious at Killington. It has steep but not radical terrain. I guess this is also a question.
post #100 of 102
Quote:
Originally Posted by BC13 View Post
Twist my arm and I'll say Snowbird.

I could be biased since Snowbird taught me to NEVER underestimate the problems that can spring up quickly skiing offpiste on a big mountain. 3 Snowbird taught lessons which I will never forget:

1) Do not follow other skiers tracks with the belief they must lead to a great shortcut. They usually are a short cut but entirely useless to those of us who believe 50 feet of air is strictly for our feathered friends.: 2 years ago the Gad lifts opened late b/c of technical problems depite unbelievable mid December snowpack. The rope to all of the Gad area was dropped on the last day of my trip but the lifts were not running, so you had to ski/hike for your turns. My buddy and I follwed some tracks past the end of Road to Provo that seemed HIGHER than the route most were taking toward the upper Gad area. After quite a hike/ sidestepping journey we lost the tracks as we were perched upon a birds nest style cliff. The tracks led off and down. I never felt so stupid...until #2 below:

2) So that is what they mean by TREEWELL! Once we got over to the trees somewhere off of Black Forest I learned just how wide a trewell can be.:

3) When it is dumping you can inadvertantly get into some really dicey terrain without realizing it. (100 yards on the Cirque traverse can make a BIG difference):

How moronic. to paraphrase "I was an idiot, went where I didn't know I was going. And ended up in a tough situation" So XXXXX ski area has the toughest terrain in the U.S.

Or my favorite reasoning;

To the people that are saying that altabird doesnt scare you then you my friends are not getting creative enough or are legends in your own mind.

If the toughest stuff at alta/bird doesnt scare you at all...maybe its time to turn pro cause your sure on their level now.

The cliffs bands in the windows, Death chute in the cirque, pipeline chute, get serious chute or 13 turns. Those runs I can do but man they do scare me, it part of the fun and he challenge. Trust me I am by no means even close to best at the bird. There are people there that can ski some really sick lines with style. I highly doubt more than 1 percent of you can claim to be better or less scared than the locals there.

I am sick of blanket statements that people put out on these sites an not being scared is one of them.

How's that for a rant?


In other words, I am scared so everyone MUST be as well.....


Pffffft....
post #101 of 102
maybe someday you can show me around big sky, and scare the snot out of me. I would thoughly enjoy that.
post #102 of 102
I am sick of blanket statements that people put out on these sites an not being scared is one of them.

How's that for a rant?


Jack, I would give you a solid 8.5/10 for that rant.

I pretty much expected a flame job when I acknwledged my former naivete and ignorance regarding mountain dangers.
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