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car top skis

post #1 of 23
Thread Starter 
how do you car top your skis w/o a rocket box? base down, base up, tips forward, tips pointing back, and reasons why? thanks
post #2 of 23
Ski bag, or at the very least binding cover.

Why? Road grime kills bindings, edges and bases.
post #3 of 23
I wouldn't. Get the box.
post #4 of 23
definitly get a box. if the cash isnt there, get a single bag and put that up there. I didnt know this a few years ago and now that i look at the old bindings on my broken rock skis, i wish i did. There so much salt and rust that ill never mount those again.
post #5 of 23
Ski bag, and check it often for holes. Just having the bag material flap around in the wind will put a hole in it letting in the salt spray and road grime.
post #6 of 23
After spending at least a half hour tuning and hot waxing my skis I like to put them on top of my truck unprotected so that I can ram road grit into the bases and bindings at 60 mph on the way to the hill.

Seriously, if they aint inside or in a box them bag'm.

My favorite is seeing the tourists driving to the hill with the skis in a rack on top of their rental car with the boots in the bindings.
post #7 of 23
Tips back to avoid wind-induced chatter.
post #8 of 23
Learned the hard way..always bag or box the skis, even on a short ride from the hotel to the mountain my main skis have suffered significantly due to road salt. Now I have to figure out what to do with 3 ski racks, 2 of which are new....oh ebay...........
post #9 of 23
how go you keep your skis still while in the box?
post #10 of 23
i toss my pack on top of them, usually slows them down a bit.
post #11 of 23
My roof top box, not long enough for skis, has little hooks on the inside of the brackets that connect to the crossbars. Anything I need to keep stable I strap down inside the box.
post #12 of 23
I throw a closed cell foam pad in the bottom of my box and it keeps the skis in one place. I have had no problems, they don't shift around.
post #13 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by mudfoot View Post
After spending at least a half hour tuning and hot waxing my skis I like to put them on top of my truck unprotected so that I can ram road grit into the bases and bindings at 60 mph on the way to the hill.
Why bother waxing, just put em on the rack and run the car thru the car wash, pay the extra dollar for Carnuba....

seriously, my skis ride on the inside. I bought a box for the extra room in the truck and I saw rust(though it was a cheapie, not Thule). I dumped the box and never use the rack for more than 10 miles and sunshine, or if I transport a snowboarder.
post #14 of 23
For longer drives, as others have said: inside, box, or bag.

From the house to the hill, usually its skis together, tips back. Always though tips forward was a "gaper" move, before I knew what "gaper" was.
post #15 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by dobol52 View Post
how do you car top your skis w/o a rocket box? base down, base up, tips forward, tips pointing back, and reasons why? thanks
Haven't done it in a while (mine go inside a minivan most of the time now), but used to put them bottoms-up and tips back, mostly for aerodynamics more than anything else.
post #16 of 23
On unsalted roads (do these exist in the US?) with dry tarmac, ice or snow surface I don't bother putting them in a bag. Tips to the rear, sole down 1 by one if I have the space (tips to front would create extra lift ), or together and tilted sideways (no rack seems to have space for modern alpine binding). On a bag it might be neglected but putting a big box on top of your car creates alot of extra drag and hence more fuel consumption (as well as a lower top speed, for those inclined...). Obviously the best is to have them inside the car, if you got the space.
post #17 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by torfinn View Post
On unsalted roads (do these exist in the US?)
Yes. Out west, Colorado say. Sanded, though.

Quote:
Tips to the rear, sole down 1 by one if I have the space (tips to front would create extra lift ),
There was at one point a line of bags that would allow you to do this and still have them covered. Grit Gardz by Gear Reichert of Torrington, Wyoming. They zipped together for carry and had cooperating handles. I haven't seen any newly made product, and NOS bags that show up on ebay and elsewhere have some trouble fitting around modern side cuts and, as you point out, modern bindings.

There was also a more form-fitted system from www.skibuddy.com , no idea whether it really worked on water-borne salt and I can't get the site to load.

Quote:
putting a big box on top of your car creates alot of extra drag and hence more fuel consumption (as well as a lower top speed, for those inclined...).
Not sure this is true in all cases. My particular counter-example is a 18 foot
skin on frame kayak that actually improved the mpg of a Honda Civic by close to 2.5 mpg highway over the bare rack (no hully rollers or anything). I think the overall air flow over the vehicle must be considered.
post #18 of 23
I typically do bases down, tips back. If there's not enough room, bases together, tips back.
post #19 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by torfinn View Post
putting a big box on top of your car creates alot of extra drag and hence more fuel consumption (as well as a lower top speed, for those inclined...).
But putting an aerodynamically designed box on the car may create less wind resistance than a clamp rack.

Certainly, my mileage appears to be better with my Yakima Blacktop Pro 21 than with my Barrecrafters theoretical sixpack clampdown.
post #20 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by comprex View Post
Not sure this is true in all cases. My particular counter-example is a 18 foot
skin on frame kayak that actually improved the mpg of a Honda Civic by close to 2.5 mpg highway over the bare rack (no hully rollers or anything). I think the overall air flow over the vehicle must be considered.
Thats pretty surprising. You should tell Honda, they might add this in an aero upgrade package J/K

And of course nothing is true for all cases. Design of the rack, box, and car makes all the difference.
post #21 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by comprex View Post
Not sure this is true in all cases. My particular counter-example is a 18 foot skin on frame kayak that actually improved the mpg of a Honda Civic by close to 2.5 mpg highway over the bare rack (no hully rollers or anything). I think the overall air flow over the vehicle must be considered.

I think a sea kayak is much more aerodynamic than a roof box though.
post #22 of 23
Merely a question of building a better box, then.
post #23 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by Birdman829 View Post
I think a sea kayak is much more aerodynamic than a roof box though.
(a) Depends which one, in each case.

(b) Aerodynamics of the kayak vs. roofbox aren't important on their own, but in conjunction with the vehicle they're on. My box has an essentially flat bottom, but my vehicle has an essentially flat top, so that's probably not much of an issue. The top profile of the box is more important.

Anyway, again, just in my experience, we got noticeably worse mileage driving with a clampdown rack than with a naked vehicle, but with the Yakima, our mileage is close enough to the naked vehicle that I don't worry about taking it off asap.
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