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Best ski for Bumps and Trees - Page 2

post #31 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by beyond View Post
Now you're cooking. Look, saying that a ski does well in the bumps for its category is not the same as saying it's optimized for bumps and trees. For instance, I owned a Karma for coupla seasons. Great all around, smooth, can carve through 2/3 a turn well and handle most crud/powder without breaking a sweat. Decent switch. But the best ski, at 87 mm, for someone who's emphasizing moguls and trees at an eastern resort? I've skied these things on Southern Star, Devil's Crotch, and Psychopath at Breck, as well as the sides of Aspen Highlands below the bowl - all in decent snow - and I can assure you they're not DESIGNED to be quick, lively, bump/tree skis.

Do yourself a favor and demo the Stryker, a Contact 10 (having a binding system does not qualify a ski as a racer, or disqualify it from pivot turns, whatever you heard), or if you prefer Germanic feel, RX8's, maybe carbon Mach 3's, maybe Stockli Crosses (not the stiffer Pro). Don't think about anything wider than 72 mm, and in the Germanic skis, go one length shorter than you'd usually try.
What would you say the best 87mm bump tree ski is? Do you think the foil would be better? It's tips are so fat..
post #32 of 43
^I'll also add that I'm 200lbs, so I can make stiffer skis move quick. Though I've flexed the karmas in a shop they are pretty light and medium stiff.
post #33 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by cabrown317 View Post
Hi,
I'm new to this forum, but I have visited it many times, and have always gotten good advice from the threads, so I figured I'd join and post a question of my own. I live on the East coast, and ski primarily at Killington. I'm 6'1 190 lbs + or - 5 lbs, and hover in between a level 6 and 7 skier. I was on the Rossi B2's (182), but stuffed them into a mogul and bent the tip up. So now I'm in the market for a new pair of skis. I liked the 182's for their stability, but found them more sluggish in short radius tight turns, which made bumps and controling speed on steep icy terrain more difficult than it should have been. I've been looking at the Dynastar Legend 8000's and the Volkl Karmas as my new ski, and have also been considering scaling down to low-mid 170 cm length, in hopes that the waist width would still provide someone my size stability at speed, but give me the short turn capability for the bumps and trees. Does this logic seem sound to anyone who has skied either of these models? Please feel free to throw in any other suggestions for skis I might want to demo.
Thanks
Honestly I think you are setting your self up for a maintainence nightmare. Ice is tune dependant more than any other condition. In fact for ice the tune is probably the most important performance charachteristic of the ski. If you are sking lift serviced glades in the east that means for probably half the seaosn you will be on poor coverage and doing moderate to severe damage to your edges. Damage which will require a retune/repair immediately after if you want to have the edge quality to actually ski ice with a smile. As a practical matter you simply cannot take a ski into the eastern glades for any lenght of time and expect it to still be sharp enough to do its job on ice afterwards.

I strongly recomend that you follow the advice to get a nice carver for icy days and a (perhaps used) midfat (about 75-85 mm underfoot) for use in the trees. If however you really want one ski to do it all I would also like to recomend you see if you cna find the fischer bigstix 8.0. It is a great carver, its light, and makes a nice all mountain board, I prefered it to the Dynastar 8000 and B2 when tested.
post #34 of 43
Bszekely, if you limit it that way, I'd say in no particular order, the Salomon X-Wing Fury, Scott Mission, a one-notch-shorter Legend 8800, the Snoop Daddy. But frankly, a Salomon Teneighty Gun is better than any of them in bumps, and a short-ish Mantra is as good. Of these, I've skied the 8800, Teneighty, and Mantra, and the Fury seems to be built a lot like the old 1080, which I've also skied, but with a wood core.
post #35 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by beyond View Post
Bszekely, if you limit it that way, I'd say in no particular order, the Salomon X-Wing Fury, Scott Mission, a one-notch-shorter Legend 8800, the Snoop Daddy. But frankly, a Salomon Teneighty Gun is better than any of them in bumps, and a short-ish Mantra is as good. Of these, I've skied the 8800, Teneighty, and Mantra, and the Fury seems to be built a lot like the old 1080, which I've also skied, but with a wood core.
Thanks for the advice. I actually just replaced my pocket rocekts with Gun LABs from last season..I can't wait to try them in powder/crud, but I need something for the east coast that is a bit thinner. I'm most likley going with the karmas.
post #36 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by cabrown317 View Post
Hi,
I'm new to this forum, but I have visited it many times, and have always gotten good advice from the threads, so I figured I'd join and post a question of my own. I live on the East coast, and ski primarily at Killington. I'm 6'1 190 lbs + or - 5 lbs, and hover in between a level 6 and 7 skier. I was on the Rossi B2's (182), but stuffed them into a mogul and bent the tip up. So now I'm in the market for a new pair of skis. I liked the 182's for their stability, but found them more sluggish in short radius tight turns, which made bumps and controling speed on steep icy terrain more difficult than it should have been. I've been looking at the Dynastar Legend 8000's and the Volkl Karmas as my new ski, and have also been considering scaling down to low-mid 170 cm length, in hopes that the waist width would still provide someone my size stability at speed, but give me the short turn capability for the bumps and trees. Does this logic seem sound to anyone who has skied either of these models? Please feel free to throw in any other suggestions for skis I might want to demo.
Thanks
Hello Mr. Brown.....I skied about 40 days at killington last year, and I have a pretty good idea of what the terrain is like and what the top skiers are skiing on.

A very large percentage of the top freeskiers at killington are bump specialists, and thus, they spend a large amount of time on mogul skis or twin tips that are good in moguls. Public enemies, dynastar troublemakers, 1080's (not guns), twisters, cabrawlers, head moguls, etc. On any given day, well over 50% of the top 1-2% of skiers on that mountain are on that type of ski.....a majority of the talent.

The other top skiers are on some sort of wider midfat, in the 90mm waist range. PR's, the occasional Seth, Line's, Heads, etc. I personally ski a 186 Head im88 with look zr18's, I think they are pretty good in bumps and trees....I'm your size, but signifigantly more advanced. I don't usually feel comfortable on anything shorter than a 180.

I have never, ever, seen a good bump/free skier at Killington on a pair of Volkl 6-stars. I have had several conversations with people regarding 6-stars, where they describe how they had them for a few days and promptly bent them while skiing bumps. A guy in my ski house bent 2 pairs before he got his 171cm 1080's....I would say he's about level 8+. He's also going to a longer ski for freeskiing next year, but will keep the 1080's for bumps.

I would highly recommend staying over or around 180cm, but something lighter without metal if you want it to be more bump specific. 182cm dynastar Troublemakers are great in bumps, aside from their durablity issues on rocks and rails....plus they're around $200 on ebay.
post #37 of 43
Supposedly the new Troublemakers (06-07) are beefed up for better durability on rails and rocks. Unfortunately any pair you find on eBay will likely be last years model
post #38 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by Highway Star View Post
Hello Mr. Brown.....I skied about 40 days at killington last year, and I have a pretty good idea of what the terrain is like and what the top skiers are skiing on.

A very large percentage of the top freeskiers at killington are bump specialists, and thus, they spend a large amount of time on mogul skis or twin tips that are good in moguls. Public enemies, dynastar troublemakers, 1080's (not guns), twisters, cabrawlers, head moguls, etc. On any given day, well over 50% of the top 1-2% of skiers on that mountain are on that type of ski.....a majority of the talent.

The other top skiers are on some sort of wider midfat, in the 90mm waist range. PR's, the occasional Seth, Line's, Heads, etc. I personally ski a 186 Head im88 with look zr18's, I think they are pretty good in bumps and trees....I'm your size, but signifigantly more advanced. I don't usually feel comfortable on anything shorter than a 180.

I have never, ever, seen a good bump/free skier at Killington on a pair of Volkl 6-stars. I have had several conversations with people regarding 6-stars, where they describe how they had them for a few days and promptly bent them while skiing bumps. A guy in my ski house bent 2 pairs before he got his 171cm 1080's....I would say he's about level 8+. He's also going to a longer ski for freeskiing next year, but will keep the 1080's for bumps.

I would highly recommend staying over or around 180cm, but something lighter without metal if you want it to be more bump specific. 182cm dynastar Troublemakers are great in bumps, aside from their durablity issues on rocks and rails....plus they're around $200 on ebay.
Nice discussion of Killington skiers. It's really a unique place in that regard. More twintips and mogul skis than almost anywhere else. I would get mogul skis for skiing there except that they don't carve well at all, so I usually go with a mid-fat twin. I had Salomon CR Lab's now I'm going with Volkl Karmas. We'll see if they do well in the bumps.
post #39 of 43
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Highway Star View Post
Hello Mr. Brown.....I skied about 40 days at killington last year, and I have a pretty good idea of what the terrain is like and what the top skiers are skiing on.

A very large percentage of the top freeskiers at killington are bump specialists, and thus, they spend a large amount of time on mogul skis or twin tips that are good in moguls. Public enemies, dynastar troublemakers, 1080's (not guns), twisters, cabrawlers, head moguls, etc. On any given day, well over 50% of the top 1-2% of skiers on that mountain are on that type of ski.....a majority of the talent.

The other top skiers are on some sort of wider midfat, in the 90mm waist range. PR's, the occasional Seth, Line's, Heads, etc. I personally ski a 186 Head im88 with look zr18's, I think they are pretty good in bumps and trees....I'm your size, but signifigantly more advanced. I don't usually feel comfortable on anything shorter than a 180.

I have never, ever, seen a good bump/free skier at Killington on a pair of Volkl 6-stars. I have had several conversations with people regarding 6-stars, where they describe how they had them for a few days and promptly bent them while skiing bumps. A guy in my ski house bent 2 pairs before he got his 171cm 1080's....I would say he's about level 8+. He's also going to a longer ski for freeskiing next year, but will keep the 1080's for bumps.

I would highly recommend staying over or around 180cm, but something lighter without metal if you want it to be more bump specific. 182cm dynastar Troublemakers are great in bumps, aside from their durablity issues on rocks and rails....plus they're around $200 on ebay.
Hi,
You seem to know more about the terrain I will be facing than anyone else in this thread. Over the past few weeks I was reflecting on past ski seasons, and have come to the conclusion that on a good day I'll spend 50% of my day in the bumps and trees. The rest of the day on groomers, and I have a buddy on Atomic SX 11's and I would love to be able to keep up with him down Header on Ram (we usually finish our day with a race down that trail). I was wondering what skis you thought would do well in the bumps, but be able to carve turns ranging from slalom to medium radius turns. I'm pretty aggressive with my turns. That is to say I like to force them rather than carve them flat out, at least the short turns...the long turns I try to get on edge as much as possible. There is usually a mild tail skid at the end. I plan on skiing 20+ days this year and working my way into the level 8 range, so I'd like a ski that will adapt with me. I was looking at both the Dynastar contact 11's and 10's. I also liked the look of the K2 Apache Crossfires and Strykers. The one concern I have is that all these skis are system bindings, and I already have the 06 Rossi Axial 120's which I love, but will suck up the extra cost if necessary. I am also concerned about the wider tips in the Bumps and for that matter the rest of the mountain as I ski feet very close together...almost touching and sometimes together entirely. Do you think the wider tips will be a problem? Also do you know of any flat skis that will do all of the following well? And finally you mentioned the trouble makers, but I'm not sure they will have the rebound energy I am used to...Used to ski k2 mach g's. Thanks so much.
post #40 of 43
cabrown-
what did you end up going with?
post #41 of 43

I ski mostly at Sunday River, and Killington when I get the chance. I cannot recommend a good mogul ski, but I will strongly suggest avoiding the Solomon Crossmax. I tore the heel-plate off the proprietary binding system on Airglow and nearly broke my wrist. (I have Leatherman to thank for a field repair that got me back to the infirmary at South Ridge.)

post #42 of 43

anybody consider anything like the Icelantic Scout?  it;s 143 in length and 105 mm at the waist.  anything I have read on TGR forum suggests that it might be an excellent trees and maybe even bump ski if you could get over the fact that they ae probably smaller than your girlfriend's skis.  Supposedly, the 1 place where these skis excel is quick turning, float and stability in slow and controlled speeds which would be an asset in tight trees.

 

Levelninesports has them for 327$ and I was thinking of taking a flyer out on them if the price dropped any more.

post #43 of 43
Quote:
Originally Posted by Highway Star View Post

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by cabrown317 View Post
Hi,
I'm new to this forum, but I have visited it many times, and have always gotten good advice from the threads, so I figured I'd join and post a question of my own. I live on the East coast, and ski primarily at Killington. I'm 6'1 190 lbs + or - 5 lbs, and hover in between a level 6 and 7 skier. I was on the Rossi B2's (182), but stuffed them into a mogul and bent the tip up. So now I'm in the market for a new pair of skis. I liked the 182's for their stability, but found them more sluggish in short radius tight turns, which made bumps and controling speed on steep icy terrain more difficult than it should have been. I've been looking at the Dynastar Legend 8000's and the Volkl Karmas as my new ski, and have also been considering scaling down to low-mid 170 cm length, in hopes that the waist width would still provide someone my size stability at speed, but give me the short turn capability for the bumps and trees. Does this logic seem sound to anyone who has skied either of these models? Please feel free to throw in any other suggestions for skis I might want to demo.
Thanks

Hello Mr. Brown.....I skied about 40 days at killington last year, and I have a pretty good idea of what the terrain is like and what the top skiers are skiing on.

A very large percentage of the top freeskiers at killington are bump specialists, and thus, they spend a large amount of time on mogul skis or twin tips that are good in moguls. Public enemies, dynastar troublemakers, 1080's (not guns), twisters, cabrawlers, head moguls, etc. On any given day, well over 50% of the top 1-2% of skiers on that mountain are on that type of ski.....a majority of the talent.

The other top skiers are on some sort of wider midfat, in the 90mm waist range. PR's, the occasional Seth, Line's, Heads, etc. I personally ski a 186 Head im88 with look zr18's, I think they are pretty good in bumps and trees....I'm your size, but signifigantly more advanced. I don't usually feel comfortable on anything shorter than a 180.

I have never, ever, seen a good bump/free skier at Killington on a pair of Volkl 6-stars. I have had several conversations with people regarding 6-stars, where they describe how they had them for a few days and promptly bent them while skiing bumps. A guy in my ski house bent 2 pairs before he got his 171cm 1080's....I would say he's about level 8+. He's also going to a longer ski for freeskiing next year, but will keep the 1080's for bumps.

I would highly recommend staying over or around 180cm, but something lighter without metal if you want it to be more bump specific. 182cm dynastar Troublemakers are great in bumps, aside from their durablity issues on rocks and rails....plus they're around $200 on ebay.

 

Hey Highway,

 

Do your recommendations reflect guys who prefer ripping zipper-line bumps or bump-carvers (even very high level bump carvers)...I'm not looking for a qualitative difference between the two styles of skiing, I'm justing seeing if your advice is applicable to me.

 

 

I ski the shorter version of the head 88's, like them a lot, but I'd like to get an additional ski that's a little softer for, well, Killington style bumps and trees! 

 

Do you figure any of the 85-95mm waisted twin-tips without metal would fit the bill??  By that I mean, are they're really great differences between them?

 

Liam

 

 

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