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B2 or 8000 ?

post #1 of 14
Thread Starter 
After wandering into the ski shops this weekend, and searching this site, I am trying to decide if I should go with either the B2 or the 8000?

I have found that when freesking, my D-star Skicross 10's start to feel loose at higher speeds when skiing in crud. I will be using these in the east, and I can get either the B2s or the 8000s for the same price.

Last year, I got in 45 days of skiing but because of geography it was limited to on-piste.

Any advice would be appreciated. Tx.
post #2 of 14
If you live out west get the B3 over the B2 or 8000. It is almost as good on groomers as the B2 & 8000 and vastly superior off piste.
post #3 of 14
I have spent quite a bit of time on both models in several sizes and feel that they have roughly similar capabilities, but somewhat different personalities.

The 8000 is livelier and more energetic with somewhat superior edge grip. The B2 is more damp and has a smoother ride but with less pop. I don't feel there is a dramatic difference between the two, just a different temperment.

One area of difference that I DO notice is how each compares within its own size ranges. the 8000 feels fairly similar thoughout the size range ie: 178 vs. 184. The B2 is pretty different with the 182 being a significantly more agressive ski than the 176.

SJ
post #4 of 14
If you are looking for a ski to take into bumps and tight trees then the B2 is the right choice. It is a much more forgiving & predictible ski. The 8000 is a better ski if you are looking for something to ski real fast especially in heavy snow. It has superior edge hold on hard snow. It definitely isn't as forgiving in bumps.

I am serious about the B3 recommendation. Since you already have a hard snow/groomer ski it would make more sense.
post #5 of 14
Great point made as the B2 excels at 182. Additionally, I have found that if deflection in crud is a particular concern yours, choose the B2 over the 8000.
post #6 of 14
I've skied both the B2 and the 8000's quite a bit, and own the 8000's. I think they're pretty similar and SeirraJim hit the main difference on the head with his post. Feel is the greatest difference between these 2 skis.

That said, there is some difference between the two. I agree the B2 is a tad more forgiving because it's a tad softer, and as Rio points out this really shows up in the bumps. Since your skiing mainly in the east though, as I do, this factor is heavily outweighed by the fact that the 8000 is superior in terms of it's hard snow performance. I've noticed no difference between these two in crud or chopped up snow.

Obviously, since I've skied them both and ended up buying the 8000, I favor the Dynastar. Demoing is the way to go, but if you can't I don't really think you'll be disappointed which ever way you go.
post #7 of 14
I can't comment on the B2 having never skied it. But I can tell you I ski on a Legend 8000 (178 with solly s810) and love them. From fast groomers at Loon to the trees at Jay, They were great. Bar none the best skis I have ever owned. I will admit that they are not the best bump ski, but that is not what I bought them for.
post #8 of 14
I demo'd the B2 a few years back and it is typical Rossi. Damp and fluid. I did not like the edge hold, however. Didn't think it was all that great in bumps either. I own the Legend and it is just a great all around ski. Very lively and is great in short, medium and longer radius turns. Handels well off-piste and is really fun on the groomers. I think it's great in the bumps too. For an East Coast ski, I don't think you can go wrong with the 8000's.
post #9 of 14
IMO, neither ski is opitimized for ice and hardpack, neither is very quick in bumps (although both are smooth going through), and both shine at big arcs at speed in chop and soft stuff (eg., typical western conditions). So neither would be my pick for an eastern utility ski. No other possibilities for you out there?
post #10 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by beyond View Post
IMO, neither ski is opitimized for ice and hardpack, neither is very quick in bumps (although both are smooth going through), and both shine at big arcs at speed in chop and soft stuff (eg., typical western conditions). So neither would be my pick for an eastern utility ski. No other possibilities for you out there?
That is a pretty fair description of most mid fats, and is a cornerstone to my opinion that there is no free lunch and everything is a compromise.

Ginger vs. Mary Ann????

SJ
post #11 of 14

SJ - definitely Mary-Ann

Quote:
Originally Posted by beyond View Post
IMO, neither ski is opitimized for ice and hardpack, neither is very quick in bumps (although both are smooth going through), and both shine at big arcs at speed in chop and soft stuff (eg., typical western conditions). So neither would be my pick for an eastern utility ski. No other possibilities for you out there?
Beyond - SkiNut has a frontside type ski in the SkiCross 10, he's looking for something a little more versatile for crud/off-trail use in the East. At least that was my interpretation of the original post. Given that, I think either the B2 or the 8000 would be an adequate choice, and better suited to handle the crud/chop that we get in the east when mother nature decides to cooperate.

SkiNut - a little more info about you would help too. What areas do you ski, what type of terrain, what do you want the skis to help you with, speed, your weight and ability level.
post #12 of 14
Thread Starter 
Thanks for all of the advice. I'm 6'0 and weigh 185 lbs and am a level 7-8 skier. While I enjoy my D-stars for skiing in Ontario and NewYork State, I found that didn't have enough heft when skiing in New England last year.

Neither the B2s or the 8000s would be my primary ski, but I'd be using them when I go to places such as Loon or Killington.

Tx.
post #13 of 14
Well, I ski Loon and Killington a fair amount, and I've skied the 8000 at K (and have owned a slew of Rossis and the 8000's, currently own a B-3, and convinced my best friend out west to buy a 8000, so I'm not anti-French). But IMO, neither ski is a very good second ski investment specifically aimed at our man-made powder, stiff chop and crud over ice. Not saying that the 8000, at least, can't manage it, but not its strength.

OK, you ask, then what better skis? I'd suggest, in no particular order:

Volkl AC3's, Fischer AMC 76's, Nordica Hot Rod Modified, Head iM72's, Rossignol Z-9's. All of them available 05-06 new on the web, buy one size shorter than you'd prefer out west.

You get the idea. Something that can bust through crud, turn quickly, and carve the ice underneath a moment later without complaining.
post #14 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by beyond View Post
Well, I ski Loon and Killington a fair amount, and I've skied the 8000 at K (and have owned a slew of Rossis and the 8000's, currently own a B-3, and convinced my best friend out west to buy a 8000, so I'm not anti-French). But IMO, neither ski is a very good second ski investment specifically aimed at our man-made powder, stiff chop and crud over ice. Not saying that the 8000, at least, can't manage it, but not its strength.

OK, you ask, then what better skis? I'd suggest, in no particular order:

Volkl AC3's, Fischer AMC 76's, Nordica Hot Rod Modified, Head iM72's, Rossignol Z-9's. All of them available 05-06 new on the web, buy one size shorter than you'd prefer out west.

You get the idea. Something that can bust through crud, turn quickly, and carve the ice underneath a moment later without complaining.

AC3's, agreed. I demoed the B2's at Jay last year at the beginning of March after a 2 foot dump and they were awesome, but I get the feeling that in more realistic conditions for Killington'Loon, Youd want something with some more fire in its belly for the harder conditions of hard packed and scratched off (it doesnt ever get skied off at K ton or Loon does it?). The AC4 this year is pretty stiff, but the AC3s may be a better softer choice for woods/deep/crud/and your everyday ice.
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