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Can a the phrase "MA" be over-used?

post #1 of 14
Thread Starter 
My answer:

(and this entire post to be taken with a hearty sense of humor )

Yes.

And it is.

Whenever a fresh new buzz-phrase appears on the technical horizon,
teeming hordes of professional educators clamber forward in the qeue to gain useage rights.

One need only peek at our collective ski-instructing past to example earlier incidents.
There was a period, over a quarter of a century ago, when "anticipation" rolled off the tongue of every aspiring ski educator in the USA.

Another quarter century hence, there was "stem" and "schuss".

I am thankful that I recall precious little terminology from the 1980s "cybervision" training concept.

I wondered aloud, as I viewed my Cybervision Ski Teaching videos, that Arnold Scwartzenegger didn't provide the voice-over.

The rush to win the useage award for the phrase "MA" is eerily reminiscent of the "Peace and Love" movement, when the term "Groovy" was being uttered with frightful repetition by everyone under 30 who owned a set of bell-bottom trousers, or was intent on purchasing a pair.

Indeed, buzz-phraseology is nothing new, and for many, it's represented the membership key into a new and elite avante-garde.

MA, itself, is (and has always been) an essential tenet of Ski Education (and, in all practical terms, any form of Physical Education), and it's rare that it's essence be overestimated.

It is a repackaged concept, however, a tenet of instruction awarded new life by it's shiny new monniker.

Certainly, none of us began analyzing movement only after the unveiling of this brave new term.

Anyone remember any of the precedent terms for movement analysis, prior to "MA"?



Hem
post #2 of 14
What does MA mean anyway?
post #3 of 14
Movement analysis, which I believe Hem is saying (tongue in cheek, of course) is skiing's equivalent of scatology.
post #4 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by nolo View Post
Movement analysis, which I believe Hem is saying (tongue in cheek, of course) is skiing's equivalent of scatology.
That made me smile. Later, RicB.
post #5 of 14
I'm too much of a pup to remember any of the terms prior to MA, and I haven't done enough spelunking into the PSIA caves to read any of them scrawled on the walls, but I've certainly heard my share of terms that you'll only hear within or Biz!

Skiing in a clinic last Spring I got tips for improvement in the realm of "finishiation".

Charlie Macarthur once told me to be more "greasy".

Personally, I'm a huge fan of "shmedium" turns.

A friend and colleague who teaches in Breckenridge describes the free-falling that happens when you extend straight up at edge change as "hucking your meat."

There are certainly a diverse array of creative thinkers in our midst, and most are capable of attaching just about any word(s) to a movement or goal. Some stick and end up in the book. Some remain under the category of personal flair. When your job requires you to paint pictures with words, the book editors end up with a lot of material to sift through.
post #6 of 14
Error Detection / Correction
post #7 of 14
The "right words" are always easier to learn than the substance behind them. In every area of life.
post #8 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by Notorious Spag View Post
I'm too much of a pup to remember any of the terms prior to MA, and I haven't done enough spelunking into the PSIA caves to read any of them scrawled on the walls, but I've certainly heard my share of terms that you'll only hear within or Biz!

Skiing in a clinic last Spring I got tips for improvement in the realm of "finishiation".

Charlie Macarthur once told me to be more "greasy".

Personally, I'm a huge fan of "shmedium" turns.

A friend and colleague who teaches in Breckenridge describes the free-falling that happens when you extend straight up at edge change as "hucking your meat."

There are certainly a diverse array of creative thinkers in our midst, and most are capable of attaching just about any word(s) to a movement or goal. Some stick and end up in the book. Some remain under the category of personal flair. When your job requires you to paint pictures with words, the book editors end up with a lot of material to sift through.
Don't forget Gription and comfortability. When living in CO, me and a housemate were up late drinking one night (yeah, so what else is new : ), trying to invent new words. This was in '88 or '89. We came up with the word Gription. We liked it and used it all the time. I was teaching at Breck and used the term as often as possible. About 5 years ago, more than 10 years after we made it up, at a PSIA even in VT, one of the examiners used the word while clinicing our group! I almost died! My probably bugged right out of my head, and it was really hard not to just burst out laughing. I still haven't gotten much play on "Comfterbility" (as it would be pronounced).
post #9 of 14
Thread Starter 
You have all made my mind up for me:

This is, indeed, a good-humored crowd.

I recall an examiner in the 1960s who pronounced methodology as "mythology", which certainly confused the rest of us.

Ssh: your observation re: "the right words" is well-put.

Thank you all for making me feel at home here.

My friday off is that much more enjoyable.

Hem
post #10 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by hemingway View Post
This is, indeed, a good-humored crowd.
...or at least a good humorous crowd.
post #11 of 14
Gription! Yay! That one has migrated to South Dakota as well. Though I believe I first heard in in reference to the somewhat aggressive tread on my jeep tires. I then heard it later when my buddy Ted and I were skiing icy conditions one day. He asked me how he could get a little more "gription" on the firm stuff.

Awesome. I heard a clinician one time refer to "automacity" as "automaticality". Sad thing was I understood what he was after.
post #12 of 14
during my previous career a peer got on a police radio upon the discovery of a headless cadaver and announced he needed the medical examiner for a.........decaffeinated body.
post #13 of 14
Rusty, Was he close to a coffee shop?
post #14 of 14
Thread Starter 
No, just a cafe

Hem
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