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More MA-RicB

post #1 of 26
Thread Starter 
This is the only video I have to post. I was out videoing a friend last March to help him in his level III quest (he made it), and he wanted a short segment of me on camera, and I thought it would be good too. Basicaly doing nothing more than skiing down to the camera. Which might be good as it might show more than if I was "trying" to show something.

So, Give me one thing to take into this season to play, one thing that will make a difference.

http://video.google.com/videoplay?do...25520005668723

Later, RicB.
post #2 of 26
First, RicB, learn to ski.
post #3 of 26
Just kidding!

Do you have any goals in your skiing? Is there a direction you'd like to take it? Clearly, the fundamentals are all there and blending very well. I could apply my own goals to you and make some suggestions, but that's not the point at all! So, do you have any desires or goals? If so, what are they?
post #4 of 26
Thread Starter 
Generaly my goal in my personal skiing is refinement in all terrain, and conditions. How's that? Or should I say " to empty my hard drive"? Couldn't resist Hem. Really though Steve, just one thing I could improve or change. Later, RicB.
post #5 of 26
Works for me. Nice skiing.
post #6 of 26
Ok, I'll take a swing... I think you could get more dynamic, committing your body more to the inside of the turns and into the new turn at the top of the turns. This would allow you to get even more out of the skis, especially as the conditions get hard like they did at the bottom of that run.
post #7 of 26

More Pizazz!

Ric,

Along the lines of Steve's comment... take a straighter line and work more variety of the bump terrain vs just working the rut. The next level up from nice skiing is "wow" skiing. When you do work sideways across the line, use your edges more so that your lateral speed is faster and you can work your skis cross under more. At 10-12 seconds, that turn is kind of banked and you skid out. If you had set up the end of the previous turn with more finish/edge angle/acceleration, you could have let the skis get ahead of you and work for you instead of "having to fold at the waist, then pop up to get your weight inside the next turn". When you let the rut force your hand, you'll often get caught like that.

The turn sequence at 19-20 seconds is getting closer to what I'm talking about.... BUT ... if you can freeze the last turn at 21 seconds just before the feet and the skis go out of the picture (crap -it's time for another Rusty still ...)



, this highlights an example of an opportunity for wow. The skis are on edge above the fall line (really nice) and they are on a fairly high edge angle for this position in the turn (again nice) and the hips are inside the skis (quite nice). Now imagine what this would be like if the knees and the ankles were "driving" the skis onto even higher edge angles. Notice the very slight divergence of the outside ski and the very slight "lazy" left hand position? A focus on "driving" the skis more would get that left side more actively involved in the turn and clean up that tiny divergence.

Skiing with more pizazz means making greater range of movements with your body parts and managing more energy transfer between you, the skis and the snow. It does not necessarily mean going faster, but sometimes trying to crank the speed up can force you to deal with more energy.

Would this bump run pass a level 3 exam? Keep in mind that bump video looks a lot easier than when you're on the other side of the lens. I know some examiners who would tell you nice but not enough if you were training, but would pass this for an exam. IM(NS)HO, this is borderline for passing. However, I am only a level 2 and my training has been in the East with firmer snow conditions and I suspect different performance expectations. These opinions are only worth what you paid to view them. Nolo - are you out there and willing to chime in?

Reviewing this post, I see that once again I've been way too picky. The funny thing about skiing with examiners and demo team people when they self assess their own skiing is that they are extremely picky. I think you have to be picky to get performance improvements at this level of skiing.
(That was supposed to be a complement Ric)
post #8 of 26
What a Stud! Nice skiing.

To go along with Ssh and TR's comments. I'd say that varying your TACTIC in that particular condition would help tremendously. I really only had one thing in mind that you could do to accomplish this, and as a bonus, it's a really easy one.

As has been said, the fundamentals are sweet, near as I can tell. But watch your hands and upper body at the "impact point" of each bump... Nearly all of your pole touches were blocks. As the turn finishes, you stick the pole tip out front and let it redirect your momentum. And since the body has nowhere to go after that, you end up having to stand straight up and move over the top of the pole, so to speak.

So next time out, find some easy bumps and ski them without touching the poles down. Still SWING them, but don't use them to deflect your body off the turn. You'll find the focus will change from hands to feet VERY quickly and all the stuff Rustyand Ssh said might just appear magically. (this is an EXERCISE, not a WAY TO SKI)

Once again. Nice turns!
post #9 of 26
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by ssh View Post
Ok, I'll take a swing... I think you could get more dynamic, committing your body more to the inside of the turns and into the new turn at the top of the turns. This would allow you to get even more out of the skis, especially as the conditions get hard like they did at the bottom of that run.
I think this a very good observation Steve, and I've heard it before. Later, RicB.
post #10 of 26
Thread Starter 
I was wondering if anyone would bring up tactics. There are alot of lines in this particualr terrain, I skied a fairly direct one, for no real reason only that I could I guess.

Interesting you think the pole plant is causing the rise, I thought it was just a timing issue in the extension, meaning I think I could have been more progressive wiht the extension and getting the tips back down on the snow. I'll have to play with that come snow time.

Therusty, that last turn is me droping down onto a road to stop. Maybe pick a different turn could you? On another note, lets hope we all don't ski our days thinking about what it takes to pass level III bumps. I been there, done that, got the pin. Can I dial it up, sure, in particualr when I teach, and need to show it, but here I was being my old self, just doing the least to get the job done. ;>D

Thanks guys. Later, RicB.
post #11 of 26
Y'know, Ric, I can't see anything amiss, and I'm not even qualifying that with "for an old guy."
post #12 of 26
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by nolo View Post
Y'know, Ric, I can't see anything amiss, and I'm not even qualifying that with "for an old guy."
Aw cmon, you can do better than that Nolo. Old guy eh? Is that the pot calling the kettle black?

I thought it was high time to put myself out there and have some new eyes take a look. Later, RicB.
post #13 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by RicB View Post
Is that the pot calling the kettle black?
There's a lot of that "Bridger look" to your skiing, RicB...

...not that it's a bad thing...
post #14 of 26
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by ssh View Post
There's a lot of that "Bridger look" to your skiing, RicB...

...not that it's a bad thing...
I've been acused of alot worse thngs. Later, RicB
post #15 of 26
Thanks Nolo. This means I have some hope for getting my level 3!

Sorry Ric, I missed the road. But you do remember the old song "Why don't we do it in the road"? Ah - never mind. Unfortunately the clip has no other close ups that show the "opportunity" this clearly. But that's why I pointed out the turn at 10 seconds first. I thought you already had your level 3 (and you are so modest it's not in your profile) (but that's why I brought up the topic) and suspected you could dial it up on demand. Unfortunately for me, when I dial it up I have to work my ass off. But when I watch examiners dial it up, they can dial it up at the same speed you were skiing without breaking a sweat and they seem to do it even when they are out for a relaxing stroll. How they do dat?

Hmm - not much point in telling you to dial it up when you were on purpose dialing it down.
post #16 of 26
Ric's my age, ssh.

Ric, I think that ONE thing is smoothing out your transitions. As Spag notes, the jabby pole plant is serving to interrupt flow down the mountain.
post #17 of 26
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by therusty View Post
Thanks Nolo. This means I have some hope for getting my level 3!

Sorry Ric, I missed the road. But you do remember the old song "Why don't we do it in the road"? Ah - never mind. Unfortunately the clip has no other close ups that show the "opportunity" this clearly. But that's why I pointed out the turn at 10 seconds first. I thought you already had your level 3 (and you are so modest it's not in your profile) (but that's why I brought up the topic) and suspected you could dial it up on demand. Unfortunately for me, when I dial it up I have to work my ass off. But when I watch examiners dial it up, they can dial it up at the same speed you were skiing without breaking a sweat and they seem to do it even when they are out for a relaxing stroll. How they do dat?

Hmm - not much point in telling you to dial it up when you were on purpose dialing it down.
I don't think you can see the road, but it is right there. I know the camera is only a regular digital, no zoom while videoing.

Don't get me wrong Therusty, dialing it up is legitimate feedback for me. I've heard it before. I'm just one of those that feel intensity follows intent. My focus that afternoon was to video a couple of friends. I really wasn't trying to show anything to the camera, up or down.

Now on the issue of whether this is level III or not, you have to keep in mind in a level III exam, in our division anyway, you will ski all but the most extreme terrain, in any conditions present. The question really becomes not one of dialing it up on this terrain, but dialling up terrain and conditions and still ski it effectively, confidently, and over the course of the exam, consistently. This isn't a definetive level III bump run. They're too small. the upper section is another story. Now if you are taking an exam in areas that don't have the terrain to dial it up, then dialing up the task would be needed. You would be expected to ski this run with more intensity.

If I had any worthwhile advice to any level III hopefulls it would be to focus less on where the bar is and more on pushing and improving your personal skiing and keeping it fun. Ski and train for your own internal rewards and let the pin fall where it may, and don't forget who you are. Enjoy the journey. It took me awhile to realize this. Later, RicB.
post #18 of 26
Quote:
Originally Posted by RicB View Post
If I had any worthwhile advice to any level III hopefulls it would be to focus less on where the bar is and more on pushing and improving your personal skiing and keeping it fun. Ski and train for your own internal rewards and let the pin fall where it may, and don't forget who you are. Enjoy the journey. It took me awhile to realize this. Later, RicB.
Yeah! This is my focus this year. If any of you see me losing this, remind me, please? It's all about the fun factor...
post #19 of 26
Nice skiing from my point of view. You appear to be in control and in good balance, and handling the bumps in probably mediocre spring conditions with aplomb.

I guess the only question I would ask would be is whether you are being
"dynamic" enough in your movements as they relate to the task, slope and conditions... but given your skill level, you could probably answer that question.
post #20 of 26
Why are you turning so much? Arc em or park em.

I'd second the motion to try and get more energy by really driving that inside foot and leg into the turn. Thats merely a refinement though, and might be more aggressive than you really want to ski all the time. It's a personal style and line selection choice.
post #21 of 26
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by nolo View Post
Ric's my age, ssh.

Ric, I think that ONE thing is smoothing out your transitions. As Spag notes, the jabby pole plant is serving to interrupt flow down the mountain.
Yeah, I have something to work on this fall. Thanks, Later, RicB.
post #22 of 26
Thread Starter 
I see a theme developing. Later, RicB.
post #23 of 26
Nice skiing, RicB, on what sounded like pretty firm snow.
I don't know if anyone else noticed this, and this may just be a trick of the camera angle. (eg. if the camera position was not totally in line with the fall-line that you were skiing.)
But I thought that perhaps your inside (right) shoulder tends to drop inwards, just as you start your turns to the right - more so than your left shoulder on turns to the left. Of course, having a white stripe across your chest makes this far more noticeable! Even so I was only really able to spot it using the pause function as it happens quickly.
Might be something to keep an eye on...
post #24 of 26
Thread Starter 
Leave it to that ski school jacket! I agree with you. Something to keep an eye on. Later, RicB.
post #25 of 26
Nice turns, Ric. I like that everything seems to move in the right direction at the right time. I'd join Nolo in suggesting you could make all the same moves more smoothly. You seem to pull the planted pole up when you extend. Maybe thinking about the pole plant hand going up and over into the turn would contribute to smoothing things out.
post #26 of 26
RicB,

Nice turns! Only thing I can suggest is, lets go skiing some time

Chris
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