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How do you keep your skis safe? - Page 2

post #31 of 72
Any thoughts as to what the best ski lock is? Assume that one will have to carry it on their person throughout the day (w/out a pack).
post #32 of 72
Post # 19
post #33 of 72
Post #20 for the gapers.
I abandoned mine at Crystal Mountain with the other 200 that were there sometime in the early 90's. My Mom thought it was the perfect christmas gift
post #34 of 72

Ski Tote = Royal PITA

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mainiac View Post
Ski Totes work great!
I had one in high school that my parents gave me as a gift... it was a terrible waste of time to get the skis properly seated and lined up in the thing. I thought it was just another piece of gear to lug around.

This thread has got me freaked out about taking my new skis to Breck the day after Christmas this year... looks like I'll be digging up my old cable lock as 'insurance'. If I lose this pair I might have to revert back to my old straight K2 skis :

Maybe the theives would see my 12 year old neon colored poles and just run the other way? :
post #35 of 72
Quote:
Originally Posted by catskills View Post
I put mine by the window of the lodge and then watch them from the lodge while I eat. I always have my quick draw trusty photo cell phone. I will run out and take their picture if they steal my skis. Then beat the crap out of them .
I do the same thing; putting them by the window on the rare day I don't eat on the lift. But as far as running out and taking their picture, then beating the crap out of them.
I would just assume skip the picture process and go straight to beating the crap out of him. Then maybe a picture for the after effect and comercial I will make about what happens to ski thieves who are caught red handed.

My skis are like a little puppy; they follow me everywheres I go. Most times I follow them.
post #36 of 72
Quote:
Originally Posted by carbonissimo View Post
How do you go about locking up your skis with a straight cable lock?
post #37 of 72
Proper-Lock up tips for Snow Sports Equipment

The most important thing to remember is to never, never, never leave your gear unattended regardless of how short a time you will be away from it! Always lock it when leaving it anywhere, even on the top of your car rack. Theft on the slopes is mostly due to easy accessibility of gear and the ability of the thief to blend in with the crowd with very little effort. Don't rely on separating your skis on the racks - most thieves grab quickly and don't notice that the skis don't match.

For skis, run a Kryptonite locking cable through the brakes on the bindings and loop around a rack or fixed pole.

For snowboards, use a Kryptonite Ball & Chain. Run the cable through the Ball attached to your extra binding insert, and through the heel cup of a binding then loop around a rack or fixed pole. Insert the cable into the combination head and scramble combination dials.

For all other gear - be sure to loop the Kryptonite cable through a permanent, fixed part on the equipment (i.e. ski board binding bail, ski bag zipper tag) and around a fixed object.

Always remember to give your lock a final tug to make sure that it is properly closed and secured before leaving your gear.
post #38 of 72
A. Step into bindings immediately prior to boarding first lift

B. Step out at day's end.


Hem
post #39 of 72
It's kind of like not needing to outrun a bear on the portage trail, just your tripping partner. You don't need the Best lock, just better than all the good skis near yours. The ski-key lives in my ski jacket pocket and I only notice it when I use it. Most places have a rack for it. It would be fairly easy to force it open, but It's kind of like not needing to outrun a bear on the portage trail, just your tripping partner. You don't need the best lock, just a better lock than all the good skis near yours. Unless you have one of those expensive art-neuveaux motzart-come new age skis (like on that Volant website, sorry VA it's yust a yoke) people aren't going to go to the trouble of busting your lock when unlocked skis are right beside it.
post #40 of 72
Quote:
Originally Posted by carbonissimo View Post
Proper-Lock up tips for Snow Sports Equipment

The most important thing to remember is to never, never, never leave your gear unattended regardless of how short a time you will be away from it! Always lock it when leaving it anywhere, even on the top of your car rack. Theft on the slopes is mostly due to easy accessibility of gear and the ability of the thief to blend in with the crowd with very little effort. Don't rely on separating your skis on the racks - most thieves grab quickly and don't notice that the skis don't match.

For skis, run a Kryptonite locking cable through the brakes on the bindings and loop around a rack or fixed pole.

For snowboards, use a Kryptonite Ball & Chain. Run the cable through the Ball attached to your extra binding insert, and through the heel cup of a binding then loop around a rack or fixed pole. Insert the cable into the combination head and scramble combination dials.

For all other gear - be sure to loop the Kryptonite cable through a permanent, fixed part on the equipment (i.e. ski board binding bail, ski bag zipper tag) and around a fixed object.

Always remember to give your lock a final tug to make sure that it is properly closed and secured before leaving your gear.
Thanks for that post Carbonissimo. I did not even think of going through the brakes. I had a couple pars of skis stolen so I will be purchasing one of those locks. No big deal since I ride with a pack every day I ride.
post #41 of 72
i just realized that a thrifty thief could lurk on these boards and learn what type of gear everybody owns and then have a field day. scary thought.

i second the eating on the lift, but with a slight modification. when in tahoe I usually brown bag it and eat in my truck. of course that's usually on nice spring days when i'm parked close to the lifts. on a few occassions (mostly spring skiing) I've even just plunked down next to whatever lift/run I'd just come off of and eaten there (I carry a small day pack with me most days).

the ski checks are great, too. some of them are even "unlimited" in that you pay $4 and you can stash and grab your gear all day, so if you need to stop for snack, lunch, a beer, another snack, and then apres ski, you can check them in each time.
post #42 of 72
I rely on reverse psychology - I don't even bother to place my skis vertically against a rack; rather, I simply leave them on the snow wherever I may have popped out. The common thief is simply overwhelmed by this maneuver.

Then again, my stuff not being stolen may have something to do with the 10 pair of children's skis and poles piled haphazardly on top of them!
post #43 of 72
Quote:
Originally Posted by iskitoofast4u View Post
I rely on reverse psychology - I don't even bother to place my skis vertically against a rack; rather, I simply leave them on the snow wherever I may have popped out. The common thief is simply overwhelmed by this maneuver.

Then again, my stuff not being stolen may have something to do with the 10 pair of children's skis and poles piled haphazardly on top of them!
You sure you don't teach in Colorado?

That's usually what happens with my skis, too! I have, however, spent 30 minutes digging through fresh powder trying to find them.
post #44 of 72
If you somehow find yourself always getting your skis stolen, when (if) you buy your next car, ask for the upgrade that allows passage from the trunk to the middle seats. I doubt someone would break windows and make all that noise for skis...

As for the ski rack concerns, most resorts have a place where you give $2 - $5 to have your skis safely stored where the theives can get them, they give you a password and everything, very secure .
post #45 of 72
Quote:
Originally Posted by iskitoofast4u View Post
I rely on reverse psychology - I don't even bother to place my skis vertically against a rack; rather, I simply leave them on the snow wherever I may have popped out. The common thief is simply overwhelmed by this maneuver.

Then again, my stuff not being stolen may have something to do with the 10 pair of children's skis and poles piled haphazardly on top of them!
Still be careful, my niece who was instructing at Okemo last year had her skis stolen out of the employees locker room.
post #46 of 72
Most skis get stolen from the rack where the thief doesn't stand out when he's "working". We always park our skis outside the ski-rack nd in plain sight (i.e. as annoyingly as possible) so that anyone approaching them stands out to all.
Personnel and lodge owners usually don't mind but you might want to check first.
post #47 of 72
Quote:
Originally Posted by Phil Pugliese View Post
Still be careful, my niece who was instructing at Okemo last year had her skis stolen out of the employees locker room.
locker room thefts happens, unfortunately, a lot. Friend of mine had a snowboard stolen last year when someone left the ski room door open. I'm sure most pros lock their skis in the locker room when they're not looking at them.
post #48 of 72
Rats are what thieves are. Pure skummy dirty rats that should be lynched. Especially the employees who steal thier colleagues skis!
post #49 of 72
Quote:
Originally Posted by catskills View Post
I put mine by the window of the lodge and then watch them from the lodge while I eat. I always have my quick draw trusty photo cell phone. I will run out and take their picture if they steal my skis. Then beat the crap out of them .

Love this!!!!!! Absolutely perfect and what a new thrill over lunch break. Actually I would go further, like placing a placard with a '07 $pricetag above the perfectly matched and shinny new skis. I don't think this is entrapment and also may fall within the "make my day" law in Colorado allowing me to first beat the crap out of them...then shoot them in defense of my life and property.
post #50 of 72
Ever since 1972, when my skis were stolen at a tiny bump in the road hill (barely) near our home, we have locked our skis. Learned the hard way. The skis had been used fewer than 10 times and were my very first pair.

The ski shop had given us a sale price, but wrote up a full price invoice for our insurance company. Even with depreciation, I got enough money to buy a new pair of skis. Our favorite ski instructor suggested that really I should have the skis my husband had, and he should get new ones. Ever since, I've maintained that my husband arranged the heist.
post #51 of 72
#1. I like the idea of the NEW 2007 Model and the $995.00 price tag.
Let's see horses are for transportation and can't transport you in deep snow. Skiis transport you in deep snow. If it is legal to shoot horse thieves, then it is legal to shoot ski thieves.

#2. I buy two to four year old model skiis. Wear them to teach kids and scratch the heck out of the top sheets as fast as possible. Leave those old, out of vogue, scratched up pieces of crap anywhere I want.
post #52 of 72
My skis are armed and they know how to defend themselves.
post #53 of 72
Quote:
Originally Posted by Phil Pugliese View Post
Still be careful, my niece who was instructing at Okemo last year had her skis stolen out of the employees locker room.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Stache View Post
#2. I buy two to four year old model skiis. Wear them to teach kids and scratch the heck out of the top sheets as fast as possible. Leave those old, out of vogue, scratched up pieces of crap anywhere I want.
Thats what my nieces skis were, 5 year old yellow Rossi 9X w/ Salomon Suspensions.
post #54 of 72
i have a simple solution:
dont take your skis off
toss a clif bar in your pocket and eat it on the chair. Just ski all day, if you have to go to the bathroom, use a tree or hold it
post #55 of 72
I'm surprised that no one has mentioned writing your name on the skis in permanent black magic marker - large letters.
It certainly would not stop someone from taking them but they might be hard to sell and a thief might not want some elses name on his skis which would indicate that the skis are stolen.
We have been very fortunate that we have never lost a pair of skis but this year we do plan to lockem up.
Gary
post #56 of 72
I always find that ski locks are not long enought to go around the rack, through the brakes then back up around the rack. Anyone else notice this?
post #57 of 72
Quote:
Originally Posted by 2-turn View Post
Great idea in theory, Except thieves usually watch you put your skis down, and have someone watching you go into the lodge signaling when your far out of sight, so they usually see where your separated skis are. Also, I know of two instances when 2 people got half thier skis stolen, some thieves just grab and walk, not realizing they got a mismatched set. I usually put them uphill from the lodge. If your worried about them, any lock will do, since the unlocked pair next to yours are easier to take.
It takes about 0.267 seconds longer to separate the mismatched pairs a couple of feet apart on the rack. Then as I'm walking away I scan the area and I usually keep my eyes on at least one set for the first 10 minutes or so - or even better put at least one set in view of where I can see them the whole break. In HUNDREDS of days doing this I've never had an issue - although I've never even caught someone scoping them out so maybe I'm just lucky :
post #58 of 72
I also seperate my skis with someone else, then seperate the pairs, and watch one pair for awhile.

I usually sit somewhere with a line of site veiw of my skis when at all possible. If not, I check them in a ski check.

At my local mountain in NJ, where anything left unatended WILL get stolen, I carry them through the bar, then out onto the deck right in front of the tables. Employees look a agravated, till they see me go back outside with them.

I will not ever, ever, ever leave my skis out of site at that resort. My sister didn't listen to me, twice, and lost two snow boards.

Sometimes catching the person steeling is worth having them stolen. I'd calmly walk out and follow them and get close even strike a conversation before they know I'm going for my skis. Then grab em as soon as some kind of authority is around.. if no authority, then its amazing how much ski boots hurt other legs.

Joe
post #59 of 72
Quote:
Originally Posted by RiDeC58 View Post
I always find that ski locks are not long enought to go around the rack, through the brakes then back up around the rack. Anyone else notice this?
The Kryptonite retractable is quite a bit shorter than I used to use, so I always look for the support post and lock my skis around that. (Always assuming it is either IN THE GROUND or fused at the base. Otherwise, they could just lift up the rack.)
post #60 of 72
Quote:
Originally Posted by RiDeC58 View Post
I always find that ski locks are not long enought to go around the rack, through the brakes then back up around the rack. Anyone else notice this?
I have deja vu, but turn the skis upside-down.
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