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Drills

post #1 of 22
Thread Starter 
We're almost to the start of the season, which for me means wondering if I've ever snowboarded before as I get re-acquainted with my edges. I like drills for at least portions of the day for most of the season, but early on here are some that I find really helpful:

1) Hangers -- traverse a wide, uncrowded slope making rapid edge changes to produce little, scalloped turns, then make a big turn and repeat in the opposite direction. Most have a "strong" direection and a weak one, make sure to do them both ways. (Originally got this from a BoosterTwo post a few years ago, thanks!);

2) Hands in Pockets;

3) Riding with eyes closed while a "spotter" calls out turns, again on a very empty slope; and

4) Spine leapers -- on a spine along the edge of the trail, make quick turns going back and forth across the spine.

I'll also be trying the 360 on-snow spins in bumps Jibster mentioned last week.

Others?
post #2 of 22
> I'll also be trying the 360 on-snow spins in bumps Jibster mentioned last week.

Speaking of those spins in the bumps, I'm still trying to get my mind around what that looks like. (Maybe Jibster will chime in.)

How do they work? Any videos, pictures, further descriptions to help me out?

I've only been riding a few seasons and am just starting to learn to ride the bumps. I'm guessing that in order to spin in the bumps, you have to be pretty much on the crest of the bump (and not in the troughs between). Is this exercise useful for beginning bumpers like me, or is it better suited for those trying to polish their existing bump skills?
post #3 of 22

spin to win

You could spin on top of the bump, but the idea is to spin and handle the terrain change mid spin. This really gets you in the zone. The spin should be consistent throughout and you just keep going and eating up bumps, troughs and whatever gets in your way until you get too dizzy...then you just spin the other direction.

I do have a video, unfortunately it's on someone else's camera. If you're a beginner bump rider you can still use this exercise. Just choose bumps that are smaller and on slightly less steep terrain. You'd think that your speed would get out of control, but it's almost exactly like just doing flatspins down a normal slope where speed is not an issue. You could warm up with a few connected flat spins in both directions on a non-bump slope. You could then approach an easier bump run and do the same spins on the edge of the bumps and the groomed slope. This way you're in the bumps a little bit (like for half the exercise), but can bail out easily. Once you've improved your skills and confidence, you can take it right down the middle of the bumps.

JB
post #4 of 22
CT,

My favorite is using bamboo. Read about it in my Rider Rally clinic notes. If you like those, you can find more clinic notes posted on my snow pro stuff page.

Enjoy!
post #5 of 22
In the spirit of using "bamboo", I have found that simply holding, overhand, a pole out in front of the torso encourages separation and much stronger and more focused application of force to the board.


Hem
post #6 of 22
Thread Starter 
Rusty,

Your clinic notes are great, and also clearly took a lot of time to compile and are much appreciated. I also really liked the flat-board turn drills, holding the board flat for a 3-count before switching to the new edge, outlined in the Jackson Rally notes.
post #7 of 22
CT,

Thanks for the compliment. I've been fortunate enough to take clinics from some of the best pros in the US. It's nice to be able to share a little of the experience with those who are unable to do so. I still use them too!
post #8 of 22

Nice site!

Wow. Thanks for the links. Nice site, The Rusty. Great work documenting some of the stuff you worked on at the Rider Rally. Makes me want to go to this year's session.



--is that how you like to be called: The Rusty? Or is Rusty OK?
post #9 of 22
Nice pick Boost! - ahhhhhhhhhhhhh

Rusty is fine. I took on TheRusty when I started my web site and found that the surf company called Rusty took Rusty.com (but was not using it - damn it I was sooo close). TheRusty is unique enough that I use it all over the web. There is a Rusty Guy on the alpine side of the forum, so sometimes we confuse people despite the different monikers. Although he claims to have visited the dark side, he does not claim to be a knuckledragger. But if another Rusty ever dares to invade this space, I will always be "THE" Rusty.
post #10 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by therusty View Post
Nice pick Boost! - ahhhhhhhhhhhhh
A pic like that almost makes you feel like everything is right with the world
post #11 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by CTKook View Post
We're almost to the start of the season, which for me means wondering if I've ever snowboarded before as I get re-acquainted with my edges. I like drills for at least portions of the day for most of the season, but early on here are some that I find really helpful:

1) Hangers -- traverse a wide, uncrowded slope making rapid edge changes to produce little, scalloped turns, then make a big turn and repeat in the opposite direction. Most have a "strong" direection and a weak one, make sure to do them both ways. (Originally got this from a BoosterTwo post a few years ago, thanks!);

2) Hands in Pockets;

3) Riding with eyes closed while a "spotter" calls out turns, again on a very empty slope; and

4) Spine leapers -- on a spine along the edge of the trail, make quick turns going back and forth across the spine.

I'll also be trying the 360 on-snow spins in bumps Jibster mentioned last week.

Others?

CTKook:

I would be interested in your elaboration on the goal(s) of each of the above exercises.

Thank You

Hem
post #12 of 22
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by hemingway View Post
CTKook:

I would be interested in your elaboration on the goal(s) of each of the above exercises.

Thank You

Hem
1) Hangers -- "soft" little turns that get you used to engaging & getting off uphill & downhill edges & provide snow "feel" through learning to use ankle & some knee articulation to control the edge, followed by a nice deep bottom turn that gives a feel for more Gs, use of hips, extension of legs thru belly of turn, etc.

2) Hands in Pockets -- better alignment & quiter upper body

3) Riding with eyes closed -- better board & snow feel, plus good practice for whiteouts

4) Spine leapers -- good practice for cross-under turns, getting balance fore & aft as you commit down the spine & then ride back up (i.e. feeling your balance move along the board), airborne edge change if you want that also works alignment & feel, or if not in the air good focus on absorption & re-extension & good prep for bumps & powder.

I played Hem, now give us your drills.
post #13 of 22
Thread Starter 
Snowboard version of "1000 steps:" little hops through the course of GS turns. First work with centered hops, then work with letting balance move through the course of the turn so that at the end of the turn you're basically doing little ollies and then at the start of the next turn you're doing little nollies. Good both for developing balance and also for seeing if there's something whack with your stance.
post #14 of 22
I have tried same task on an mellow pitch bump run, with the "centered hops"...Interesting reactions from participants.
post #15 of 22
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jonah D. View Post
I have tried same task on an mellow pitch bump run, with the "centered hops"...Interesting reactions from participants.
Rave reviews? Raving reviews?
post #16 of 22

Hammers, nails, and a t-square

Rave? Raving?

Where are your "ufo" pants, rave whistle, and glow sticks? Seriously though the feedback was as follows:
  • Very comfortable on toe-side even with the occasional increase of speed (challenge factor/switch...a little bit more challenge)
  • Heel side much like a train wreck at first...once the timing, intensity, duration (aka TID) kicked in there was a little bit better degree of comfort. The most significant factor was the increase usage of;Flexsion & extension of both the ankles & knee. Some commented on working against the body's natural instinct to shift their center of mass either fore or aft. I believe once the right level of flexsion & extension was achieved they were good to go.
  • Challenge factor switch...heel-edge/switch, most commonly resorted to placing weight more on back foot which in some cases made hops more like ollies at times rather than hops. But again after a few attempts were able to dail in just exaclty where the center of mass needed to be focused more.
  • Students realized that at the start of the hop it was easier on the left side of the mogul and then hopping over the crest/top to the right side (heading diagonally across the fall line). Some experimented with waiting til they were at the crest/top of the mogul .only to land sometimes in the trough which was often met with an endo or slow cart wheel over the bars.
  • Side note: at first there was quite a bit of almost commical arm waving going on!!! (maybe there was a rave going on after all?)
  • After the clinic, individuals were pretty much fearless when going back into the bumps. There was an overall high level of confidence with their center of mass, weight distribution, and pressure managment.
CTKOOK? San Nicademus High School Football Rules!!!!! Ok, I've jumped into the mud puddle now how about you?
525x525px-LL-vbattach1172.jpg
post #17 of 22
Thread Starter 
Very cool feedback.

I always think of NY as being a basketball state and then realize that it's produced a lot of really good football players to say the least. No photos here, you're a good-looking guy but if I put my mug up Rusty would have to delete that post for sure.
post #18 of 22

Pivot drills / mxmxviii

CTKOOK....xyzpdq,
  • Another good one excersize is on relatively flat terrain: Have students work on pivoting to board with one foot at a time rather both. (Keeping on foot some what static...while other creates the pivot.) Think of a basket ball player. Same idea here, focus on keeping boards base relatively flat if possible. Key thing here to get a decent grasp of this task... I feel almost little or no pitch works best. Case in point if there is more pitch to contend with the you get students using a bit more edging rather flat/even weight alomg the boards base. You end of getting the students doing skidded pivots across the hill.
  • Which brings me to the next progresion...turn up the volume/pitch. Students were then commenting on the fact that the fore/aft movment comes into play. Also the shortening/lenghting of the legs. Generally if the task was done with some sucesss the students lead leg was extended, back/trailing leg was shortened.
  • Be care young jedi...for more challenge try switch..this caused some interesting near edge catch situations. Oh yeah pick a day to do this wheh there is not a ton of on hill traffic.
Jonah

"No matter how hard you try you can't stop us now...."Africa Bambata & the soul sonic force / NYC Break Dance Anthem of the eighties
post #19 of 22
Thread Starter 
Very cool Jonah, a variant of those are actually how I really got the feeling of "collapsing" my hip into turns, apart from the weight distribution & possibly rotation aspects depending on how these are done.

Here's one I don't like: dagger turns. Basically working on really exaggerating a dynamic weight shift and "throwing" the board through the turn. I think it takes a great concept, namely dynamic riding, and turns it into something dysfunctional. Too much of a good thing. For you golfer types -- and I know you're out there : -- it would be like getting hands too active so you don't stay deep through the shot.
post #20 of 22
I often run across a few dagger throwers here and there.Mainly in my area still a few slow pokes using the 75 -25 split/rudder/pivot turn specials!!! (Hey wait that's how I'm still riding these days!!! Oh well guess I blew my cover!) CTK - good info re: the alpine/shoulder thread
post #21 of 22
Thread Starter 
Flatland linked heels: on a relatively mellow open slope, on your heelside edge, weight the nose slightly, throw a backside rotation and butter 360 back to your heelside edge. Close to a stupid pet trick imo, but 1) is fun and 2) helps develop part of the feeling for a backside rotation in the air.
post #22 of 22

Carving drills

Several good carving drills here.

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