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I nearly died today - Page 2

post #31 of 54
Tom, aint ice a b****, especially in that situation. Glad you came out OK.

SCSA, so a guy can ski 90 days a year and still have a family. My 14 and 12 yr. old are more interested if friends are involved, my 7 yr. old is the most enthusiastic and puts more into a run than the older ones. Sigh, time and money, how to spend it.
I've been through the trees a few times in search of untracked powder, should get a helmet or just be ready to go after a good powder dump. If the snow would just cooperate with my schedule and situation ...
post #32 of 54
Tom,

Great post and glad you are ok. Welcome, to epicski you are already a valuable member. You can tell because this post has made for some great conversation and sharing of "opinions". Stick around and the way I love the other pics and vids at your site.

SCSA,

Great points and I will be politically incorrect and agree with you. Give me the whole mountain but parts of it just don't need to be skied to "enjoy" the sport or to become better at it. Taking some risks are part of the enjoyment of the sport but only the ones that make you look foolish and not dead. This is for me only and to everyone their own. Don't tell me how to enjoy "my" skiing.

Ed
post #33 of 54
it's a good thing SOME people like adventure. if not: the americas would still be solely inhabited by native americans, we probably wouldn't have air travel, and, well, we probably wouldn't have SKIING. not to mention men on the moon and exploring the north and south poles.

sure, you say, but that's very different from attempting something that looks that dangerous just for a thrill. the only thing he could possibly gain was an adrenaline rush and a feeling of satisfaction, whereas these others were advancing mankind. so? who are you to look down at what tom does for entertainment? Tom's risks are calculated. he's aware of them. he accepts them.

the world is a better place b/c of people taking calculated risks. is tom making the world a better place? for him, maybe. i'd suggest that skiers like tom have improved the world of skiing. but that isn't the issue. adventure is simply not for some people, whether it's fear or practicality that holds them back. that's fine, but don't hold others back.
post #34 of 54
Everybody should definately measure their own skill and comfort level vs. the risks of specific terrain/conditions. Its totally personal.

Of course, the most dangerous thing anybody does in skiing - far more likely to kill you than tree skiing or cliff hopping - is *driving* there.
post #35 of 54
<BLOCKQUOTE>quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by Auxcrinier:
it's a good thing SOME people like adventure. if not: the americas would still be solely inhabited by native americans<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

Aux Crinier:

I know what you're trying to say, but some people would find it in extremely bad taste to equate a nearly successful genocide with "a taste for adventure."

Sorry for getting off topic. And now back to our regularly scheduled programming...
post #36 of 54
<BLOCKQUOTE>quote:</font><HR>Originally posted by jamesdeluxe:


Aux Crinier:

I know what you're trying to say, but some people would find it in extremely bad taste to equate a nearly successful genocide with "a taste for adventure."

Sorry for getting off topic. And now back to our regularly scheduled programming...
<HR></BLOCKQUOTE>

oh shut up. :

any 'genocide' you refer to took place far after the initial discovery, and had nothing to do w/ either the initial discovery or subsequent explorations.

note the use of the word 'solely'. lose the P.C. paranoia. it's presumptious and distasteful.

<FONT COLOR="#800080" SIZE="1">[ March 30, 2002 03:03 PM: Message edited 1 time, by Auxcrinier ]</font>
post #37 of 54
SCSA, are you serious?

If you are I hope you stay in the middle of the trail and go slow. People are killed skiing the groomed and sliding into the trees too. Better give up skiing altogether.

I wonder what the death rate of golfing is compared to skiing?
post #38 of 54
Are you ready?

action boy now
action girl now
be prepared to climb another mountain
Are you ready?

action boy now
action girl now
be prepared to swim across the ocean
Are you ready?

be prepared
to fill you plate
be prepared
don't hesitate
be prepared
for a great big bust
be prepared
to do what you must
be prepared
to take a hit
be prepared
to go for it
be prepared
for a sneak attack
be prepared
just don't look back

They say, where there's a will there's a way
We've heard, these are the things that they say
So….

Reach out for that big fat star
stick to the groove
and go real far
outrun the ones who steal the Abar (??)

Are you ready?

action boy now
action girl now
be prepared to blast into the future
action boy now
action girl now
be prepared to rearrange the picture

Are you ready?
post #39 of 54
I agree that tolerance for risk is an extremely personal issue, and not open to value judgement by anyone.

And there's the issue of relativity. I ski conservatively, for many reasons, among them being even the slighest injury can turn into career hell, but an astonishing number of people in my profession think that participating in any sort of snowsport other than snow shoeing is insanity! :

On the other hand, every society needs its heros. Think about the snowboard instructor Jeremy Glick. Perhaps having the cajonnes to push the envelope in his sport, gave him the courage to do what was needed, when the time came.

Lets Roll!
post #40 of 54
Great Post, great pics. I love the Superforce Nines too.. a fine stick.

<FONT COLOR="#800080" SIZE="1">[ April 01, 2002 07:41 AM: Message edited 1 time, by Rubob ]</font>
post #41 of 54
SCSA - Everyone has a level of risk they are willing to take in activities they pursue, the personal bar is set by many personal ideals, some such as yours, but obviously they are yours and yours alone and just because you have gotten to a point in your life where you have toned back or refuse to pursue "risky" activities that result in personal gratification/satisfaction, it doesn't mean that others that do are wrong in doing so and are dumped into one stereotyped category.

For some of us, life begins once we step out of work and pursue activities that challenge and exhilerate us both physicaly and mentally. Fullfillment and a feeling of success and happiness may be balance with personal growth and achievement along with family relationships. The late Alex Lowe, and all living and dead "famous" outdoors men/women are perfect examples of this.

You have obviously reached a point where your confidence has been shaken in your abilities and you have decided that the risks are no longer worth the results. I wouldn't ever hold that against you, but do you need to justify your very personal decisions by dumping on others who haven't gotten to that place yet?

Obviously with your stance it would be easy to take your philosophy to the extreme, such as not flying on airplanes, or driving a car at night, or even crossing a road, since people die doing these routine activities, and that would be too selfish.

I'm not trying to flame you, and if it seems it, I apologize in advance. Yours is just an interesting outlook, and an interesting topic. I don't think you are alone in your out look and I think it is one we all face as we get older, we each can look back on our youth and pick out behaviours that we now shudder at, and just wonder how we ever lived this long at all.
post #42 of 54
For some of us, life begins once we step out of work and pursue activities that challenge and exhilerate us both physicaly and mentally. Fullfillment and a feeling of success and happiness may be balance with personal growth and achievement along with family relationships.

nicely said, powderhound. I didn't realize my potential until quitting private law practice and freeing myself to have play time at 5:30pm every day and all weekend long. my skiing and mtb riding have leapt to new levels and I keep pushing harder. I doubt I'll ever catch up to the superstars who appear regularly in Powder's photos, but as long as I'm pushing the envelope and not getting complacent or scared into mediocrity, I keep myself rejuvenated and alive.
post #43 of 54
"...and we were back in time for tea. "

<FONT COLOR="#800080" SIZE="1">[ April 01, 2002 08:40 AM: Message edited 1 time, by ryan ]</font>
post #44 of 54
Todd, I agree. It's really a personal issue. I take risks skiing and in other aspects of my life and healthy fear makes me feel alive. I almost always try to have an escape route when things don't go as planned and I'm pretty bullet proof as far allowing myself to be pushed to do something I'm not confident about.
post #45 of 54
WoW!! : Glad you came out all right Tom. [img]smile.gif[/img]
post #46 of 54
powderhound,

Nicely said.

Well, I jumped off the cornice the other day skiing with SnoKarver. Got some nice air and nailed it - right in front of the Club Med instructor!

My problem, is that I love danger too - that's why I'm an entrepreneur.

The trees? I don't know what it is, probably the quick turns, but I can just ski them real well. That's when I knew I was in trouble. See, with my personality, I'd just keep pushing myself. So, I just have to stay out of them before something goes wrong.

No, I'll never lower myself down a rope to go skiing. But maybe I should keep my opinions to myself about others who do. After all, it's their life.

Yes, you'll still see me rippin. But I just need to find other ways to challenge myself. It's easy - smoother bump skiing, better turns. There's lots to work on inbounds.

Cheers,
post #47 of 54
This has been an interesting experiment. Tom of course is a maggot and someone suggested he repost here and see what the response was. When powmag is back up, you guys might be interested in checking out the same thread there.
post #48 of 54
SCSA, If you have had good training, lowering yourself down a chute or cliff, rocks, etc. by rope can be very safe and can allow access to some great terrain. It is just sort of a pain to carry all the gear and take the extra time away from actually skiing.
post #49 of 54
I wonder what condition it might be in, during 2003?

Great Photos.

[ August 15, 2002, 08:30 AM: Message edited by: IceKing ]
post #50 of 54
Just found this thread. Thats fantastic. I gotta find somebody to ski Europe with one of these days.
post #51 of 54
Nothing compares to the danger of a lift in Tom's dodgy old Citroen. Been there, done that, got brown underwear
post #52 of 54
Quote:
Originally Posted by SCSA
powderhound,

Nicely said. Well, I jumped off the cornice the other day skiing with SnoKarver. Got some nice air and nailed it - right in front of the Club Med instructor!

My problem, is that I love danger too - that's why I'm an entrepreneur.

The trees? I don't know what it is, probably the quick turns, but I can just ski them real well. That's when I knew I was in trouble. See, with my personality, I'd just keep pushing myself. So, I just have to stay out of them before something goes wrong.

No, I'll never lower myself down a rope to go skiing. But maybe I should keep my opinions to myself about others who do. After all, it's their life.

Yes, you'll still see me rippin. But I just need to find other ways to challenge myself. It's easy - smoother bump skiing, better turns. There's lots to work on inbounds.

Cheers,


pussywhipped.
post #53 of 54
Salomon Superforce 2 S in the Pas du Chevre picture ?

Are those the 'rock skis' ?

Might have been easier work with a wider ski.
post #54 of 54
Well, the thread is 3 years old. I think a lot of us still had straight skis at that time at least the old pair (rock) skis were straight. Thanks for dregging this up, Sluff Vert! Great thread!

OK I see now that Tom@cham dregged this thread up. Tom, your my hero but sharpen your edges!
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