or Connect
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Moguls/bumps

post #1 of 29
Thread Starter 
September 1st can't wait to get on skis. I took ski lessons in Whislter this summer at Momentum Adult ski camp. Anyone ever attend Momentum, Mogul logic, High North or World for mogul specific lessons? One of the instructors, Jim Schiman, who is a former world cup mogul skier made an interesting comment that he feels majority of mogul skiers slide down the back side of the bump as opposed to carving the backside of the bump. One of the reasons is an inability to maintain forward pressure, another reason is not getting all your weight on the downhill ski quick enough along with making quick,short radius turns. A second instructor, Jason Smith also a world cup competitor, demonstrated a drill for weight shifting. While making wide radius turns shift your weight onto the uphill ski, maintain forward pressure, initiate a turn with a lateral knee roll and then quickly get on the uphill ski. Anyone got any drills?
post #2 of 29
Welcome to Epic jsul185! It's nice to see good feedback from the camps. Thanks for posting that. Reacquiring forward pressure on the backs of the bumps is a common problem. One drills for this that I teach on the groomers is to lift the tail of the inside ski and press the tip into the snow all the way through the turn. There are many many more.

You might find it helpful to "SEARCH" for threads that contain the word "mogul". There's also an advanced search so that you can limit the results to threads that have mogul in the title. There are many threads on Epic covering the topic from movement analysis of individuals to philosphical discussions that also talk about drills that you can do to improve your mogul skiing. Enjoy!
post #3 of 29
When I did my CSIA level 3 course a couple of seasons ago the coach had me doing double pole plants on the crest of the bumps (this was on steep/large moguls) ... the problem I had was that I was flexing a fraction too early so by the time I actually should have flexed I had no room to absorb & no time to extend again on the other side ... so maintaining control in the fall-line on steeper bumps without introducing a skid was rather demanding. This exercise forced me to wait that all important fraction of a second & got me to re-centre ... it worked wonders for me and now I use it a lot in my own training and also with more advanced clients. The one key for me was to make sure that you swing the pole baskets out & forward with a circular wrist motion as opposed to lifting the pole by extending the hands forward & up ... when you're actually in the bumps this makes more sense as you avoid catching the baskets (especially on the inside) on the front of the bump.
post #4 of 29

The definition of "carve"

Quote:
Originally Posted by jsul185 View Post
September 1st can't wait to get on skis. I took ski lessons in Whislter this summer at Momentum Adult ski camp. Anyone ever attend Momentum, Mogul logic, High North or World for mogul specific lessons? One of the instructors, Jim Schiman, who is a former world cup mogul skier made an interesting comment that he feels majority of mogul skiers slide down the back side of the bump as opposed to carving the backside of the bump. One of the reasons is an inability to maintain forward pressure, another reason is not getting all your weight on the downhill ski quick enough along with making quick,short radius turns. A second instructor, Jason Smith also a world cup competitor, demonstrated a drill for weight shifting. While making wide radius turns shift your weight onto the uphill ski, maintain forward pressure, initiate a turn with a lateral knee roll and then quickly get on the uphill ski. Anyone got any drills?
Hey, Jsul! Guess you guys had fun out west this summer. Say hello to Joe M for me. My schedule will ease up this winter (not coaching at WV this season), so maybe we’ll meet up on the snow sometime.

Your post brings up a communication issue that’s really interesting to me and central to all of my mogul instructing and coaching. I write about it, at length, in my book.

Here’s something I’ve observed: When mogul skiers use the word “carve,” they don’t mean the same thing that instructors and racers mean when they use the word “carve.” The mogul skier’s “carve” allows for more skidding than the instructor’s or racer’s “carve” does.

So long as you’re talking with other mogul skiers, mogul coaches, etc, it’s okay to have a private definition of “carve;” you can all communicate with one another and know what you’re talking about. But with this post of yours, you’ve moved from that summer mogul skiing camp full of bumpers to a ski forum full of instructors and others who generally subscribe to the instructor/racer definition of “carve.” The result? Confusion and miscommunication.

For a number of reasons, mogul skiers and mogul coaches are eager to use the word “carve” to describe what we do in the bumps. Among these reasons is the fact that, for many years, the skiing masses have held carving/arcing as the gold standard of a "proper" skiing turn. Over the years, particularly when our discipline was young, mogul skiers have been accused of lacking technique and executing impure, ineffective turns. This carving/arcing-vs.-skidding standard of turning excellence, however, comes from alpine racing and doesn’t actually apply to mogul skiing, because mogul skiers do not try to move their bodies back and forth across the trail (which requires fast, efficient traversing between every turn and thereby makes the carve/arc necessary). We move our bodies straight down the hill.

All of this is important to me because I teach mogul skiing to average expert skiers who don’t hang out with bumpers; they have the instructor’s/racer’s definition of “carve” in their heads. Over the years, I’ve bumped into a few strangely effective, simple, one-liners for this audience. One of these is “don’t worry about carving in the bumps.”

When you advise an instructor or racer or most any advanced skier to “carve” in the bumps, he/she tries to do all sorts of things that don’t work in bumps. To make our mogul skiing techniques appreciated and understood by the masses, bumpers need to stop using the word “carve.” And I’m even talking about U.S. team skiers and coaches, and all of my USSA mogul coaching colleagues. “Carve” is simply not an accurate description of what we do. I could show you video after video after video of World Cup and Olympic mogul runs to demonstrate that bumpers don't carve on the backside of the bump or anywhere else, given the mainstream definition of the word “carve," a definition that's been around far longer than organized mogul competition has been around. Good bumpers use their edges very effectively. But we don’t carve.

-Dan DiPiro

P.S. While the best bump skiers often talk about carving on the backs of bumps or between bumps, when they ski good mogul courses at speed, their skis are often in the air in these places! Yes, modern ski technology is pretty amazing, but manufacturers are yet to create a ski that carves in mid air! Watch a World Cup video in slow-mo and you'll see what I mean.
post #5 of 29
Hey guys! I agree with Dan that it's a pretty rare thing to "carve" down the back side of the bump, and we shouldn't just lay 'em flat and be at the mercy of a skid/slip situation either. There still needs to be an edge change so we can allow the ski to arc (I think is the better word). It allows for a much better set-up for each on-coming bump, even while airborn, because when we reach the next bump, the ski TIP will hit it and begin to bend as opposed to the just the flat of the ski underfoot. If you've ever hit a bump sideways, whether it was a tactical speed check or a flat-out mistake, you know that it's tiring. Sometimes painful!

I do have a question about all this though. When "Forward Pressure" is discussed, What are you referring to? I see coaches and instructors sometimes saying forward pressure, when what they're really after is just "not back". The student can sometimes misconstrue then, and end up levering forward too far forward. Unfortunately "forward pressure" is sometimes the best way to say what you want, even though I feel it is inaccurate.

September 2nd. It snowed a little yesterday in the higher reaches of the Black Hills... Had the season's first ski dream last night. Opening day isn't until Nov 26. (Sigh) It's going to get worse before it gets better I think.

Spag
post #6 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by Notorious Spag View Post
...I do have a question about all this though. When "Forward Pressure" is discussed, What are you referring to? I see coaches and instructors sometimes saying forward pressure, when what they're really after is just "not back"....
Spag
Yes, Spag, I think that's right... "not back"... an aggressive posture is so important in bumps... always driving the hips down the fall line... never allowing them come back over the heels. Then you're in a position drive the ski tips down in every trough with quickness and force (extension), maintaining as much ski-to-snow contact as you choose to maintain (depending on how fast you want to go), and maintaining your balance, too.

-Dan
post #7 of 29
Thread Starter 
Great replies, I have read Dan's book, Everything the instructors never told you about mogul skiing and I highly recommend it. I believe mentally understanding what your trying to accomplish on differant terrain is vitally important. This is why I mention "carving" on the backside. I struggle with the concept. I like Spag and Dan's explanation relating carving to arcing, makes sense. When driving down the backside bump I try to stay out of the trough riding the bump high where the softer snow is,however, I think maintaining ski to snow contact is essential. Is it fair to say, on any terrain, that the goal when skiing is to maitain constant ski to snow contact?

When I lose control, I skip a bump and land on the frontside of the next bump. Like Spag said it can be painful. I may call it speed check but it's a flat out mistake. If you go to www.skidebosses.com, click on 2006, lake placid 20/01/06. Dale begg smith has great ski to snow contact while second place Alex Bilodeau seems to slide at the top and catch constant air at the bottom.

When I mentioned forward pressure I mean keeping you weight on the balls of your feet and never transferring weight to your heels.

jsul
post #8 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by Dan DiPiro View Post
P.S. While the best bump skiers often talk about carving on the backs of bumps or between bumps, when they ski good mogul courses at speed, their skis are often in the air in these places! Yes, modern ski technology is pretty amazing, but manufacturers are yet to create a ski that carves in mid air! Watch a World Cup video in slow-mo and you'll see what I mean.
Then explain how, when I went to the Olympia Mogul Camp, we worked on doing an edge set/direction change on the back of the bump. Also, when my friend (who's in a whole different statosphere than I) came back from a bump clinic, they were working on pushing off the back of the bump to gain speed.:
I agree they're in the air for most of the back side of the bump, but I don't think that's a goal.....
post #9 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by 2-turn View Post
Then explain how, when I went to the Olympia Mogul Camp, we worked on doing an edge set/direction change on the back of the bump. Also, when my friend (who's in a whole different statosphere than I) came back from a bump clinic, they were working on pushing off the back of the bump to gain speed.:
I agree they're in the air for most of the back side of the bump, but I don't think that's a goal.....
Good question, 2-turn. And here's the answer: mogul skiers control their speed, to a large extent, with absorption and extension.

Maximum absorption and extension = maximum ski-to-snow contact = maximum control.

And this – maximum control – is what I first teach aspiring bumpers, what your coaches were teaching you at camp, and what all new bumpers should learn.

World cup mogul skiers, however, are not out for maximum control. Their skis leave the snow between bumps not by accident, 2-turn. They are speeding themselves up (because speed is 25% of their score in competition) by lessening their ski-to-snow contact via less extension over the troughs. They are able to remain balanced, comfortable and in-control at high speeds and with less purchase on the snow. Again, the World-Cupper's skis leaving the snow between bumps is no accident.

But it takes a book to explain this stuff thoroughly, 2-turn. I invite you to buy a copy of mine on Amazon, give it a read, and let me know if it makes sense to you.

As for “pushing off the back of the bump”…. More ski-to-snow contact on the back of the bump will make you more comfortable with the speed at which you’re traveling; it’ll give you the means of handling your speed and remaining balanced, but it won’t actually increase your speed.

-Dan
post #10 of 29
Thread Starter 
it's great to hear about other camps. Does Olympia mogul camp have a website?
post #11 of 29
Interesting stuff from Dan, and well-expressed.
post #12 of 29
One instance in which I've seen people asked to carve in moguls is when doing the bump part of PSIA level II and III tests. As far as I can tell, skiing the zipper line is *not* a good idea there. Testers look at standard skiing criteria like a bigger independence of the skis etc. But then that is not mogul skiing as per this thread.
post #13 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by jsul185 View Post
it's great to hear about other camps. Does Olympia mogul camp have a website?
I didn't find it under Olympia, which was the name on the flyer my friends had, but these are the same people running Mogul Logic and it is the same instruction.
http://www.mogullogic.com/
The camp I took several years ago was a travelling camp at Killington run by Chuck Martin and several current and former World Cuppers. At that time, they also did the summer camp at Whistler and winter camps at Winter Park. I'm not sure if they still travel. Excellent instruction, they broke it down into 4 segments, Balance/stacking, Extension/absorbsion, turns(IIRC) and airs, and you got a different coach for each each segment.I got Chuck, Dave Babick, Ellen Shields, and I don't remember the the fourth off hand. They broke up the groups well, ranging from the top group, who had current and "good enough to be" World cup competitors in it, I think there was another group, then there was my group, and then 3 or 4 more, ranging down to the advanced intermediates. They broke down the movements beautifully, were surprisingly one on one considering there were eight in our group, had some great exercises that demonstrated thier objective and just watching thier execution I learned a lot. At the end of our camp Dave came over to the house we rented at Killington and had beer and pizza while he analyzed our videos. I know some intermediates who took the summer camp at Whistler and loved it.
One of the exercises was to exaggerate the absorbsion by skiing directly into a mogul, and come to almost a stop and your butt is almost touching your binding. I remember that one well cause it really drove home the absorb thing.....
post #14 of 29
The only real definition of "carve" is when the ski tracks along its edge, the tail passing over the same point in the snow as the tip. Hard to imagine many people doing that in bumps,certainly on the zipperline. You would have be carving tighter radius turns than SL skiers. Perhaps on Snowblades...
IMHO introducing the word "carving" when talking about mogul skiing is a bit of a red herring.
post #15 of 29
Thanks for the clarification, Dan. Lots of good banter going on here.

I think it's important to stay centered so that we can allow our hips and center of mass to keep driving forward, and also to keep the pivot point of the skis underfoot. Things can happen pretty quickly even when skiing slowly in the bumps, and our quickness in getting from one turn to the next can rely heavily on our ability to re-direct the skis. If we are too far forward, the pivot point on the ski is out in front of the binding, which can make the tail of the ski travel outside the arc of the tip. Harder to control. And skiing aft is, well, evil.

Does anyone have any good ways to explain this concept to students or peers other than "Forward Pressure"? This might be a subject for another thread, as it applies to so much more than bump skiing.

Cheers,
Spag
post #16 of 29
Spag,

I suspect you know this already, so this is for the pack following the thread. Because so many apsiring bump skiers are so easily put in the back seat on contact with the front side of the bump, telling them to push/drive their tips forward to maintain contact on the back is the most common tip to get students centered. It does not "explain the concept", but it achieves it.

For more advanced students I've used the old pole in the snow and a variation of the jet turn. For thinkers, I've used a pole placed vertically on the snow to demonstrate back seat skiing vs being perpendicular to the OVERALL snow surface. The part seems obvious, but when you point out all of the various snow surface angles in a bump field, it's easy to see how the mind can get confused about where it should be. For an extreme example of getting centered, I'll look for a big gap between bumps and do a jet turn between them. When you extend out almost horizontally to the pitch, then "land" on the bottom bump face you can really feel the centering process in your ankles as you absorb the landing and transition back to vertical. That's the feeling/concept you want in your regular bump turns to stay centered, just not as extreme.
post #17 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by Martin Bell View Post
The only real definition of "carve" is when the ski tracks along its edge, the tail passing over the same point in the snow as the tip. Hard to imagine many people doing that in bumps,certainly on the zipperline. You would have be carving tighter radius turns than SL skiers. Perhaps on Snowblades...
IMHO introducing the word "carving" when talking about mogul skiing is a bit of a red herring.

You know, I was just about to say the exact same thing. In this instance, I prefer to use the word "scarve" - a steered carve
post #18 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by Martin Bell View Post
The only real definition of "carve" is when the ski tracks along its edge, the tail passing over the same point in the snow as the tip. Hard to imagine many people doing that in bumps,certainly on the zipperline. You would have be carving tighter radius turns than SL skiers. Perhaps on Snowblades...
IMHO introducing the word "carving" when talking about mogul skiing is a bit of a red herring.
How about mometary carve? When you ski the 'slow line fast' I believe carving takes place. I have found that you can add some carve to Dan D's method, too. Carve can mean different things to different folks. I believe that I often carve in the bumps but others may dissagree.
post #19 of 29
Hiya Paul. Where in the turn do feel the most carving take place? How about the least? I feel fairly skiddy when skiing bumps, but I guess I might feel the most "carvy" at the bottom 1/3 of the bump I'm going around, and the least at the middle 1/3. Is that what you mean by "momentary carve"?
post #20 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by Notorious Spag View Post
Hiya Paul. Where in the turn do feel the most carving take place? How about the least? I feel fairly skiddy when skiing bumps, but I guess I might feel the most "carvy" at the bottom 1/3 of the bump I'm going around, and the least at the middle 1/3. Is that what you mean by "momentary carve"?
Well now, I'm not sure. First of all, when I ski the the slow line fast (if I actually do that) I would say it's turn initiation, turn and maybe release to a bit of a skid to accomodate tight quarters. I avoid the back of the bump at all cost.

Dipro's approach to (zipper line) bump skiing is much less carving in nature, but I do believe there is carving involved. I may be too liberal in my use of the word carve here. But that's how I see it, and feel it.

A momentary carve should be as close to a true carve as possible as I see it.
post #21 of 29
Yeah, if I'm making slower, round turns in the bumps I avoid the backs too. It's easier on the body to go around. In that instance I think more of "Scarving", where the skis are travelling in a consistent arc, but with any degree of skidding depending on my needs at the time. A pure carve takes too long to develop (in my mind), so I have to displace the tip/tail by turning the ski a little more, and tipping the ski on edge a little less. I think I mis-spole when I thought I was "Carvy" at the bottom of the turn. In a slower bump turn, it feels skidded throughout, but consistently skidded. (I'm confusing myself!)

Please keep in mind I hardly EVER ski bumps slowly. I haven't really started to pay the price for that yet, and until I do, ROCK ON!
post #22 of 29
I like to do both. I like the firm control of skiing the slow line fast and I like zipper line too. I need a video to show what I mean by carving in the bumps. Like I said, many may not agree with my definition of carve.
post #23 of 29
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Notorious Spag View Post
Yeah, if I'm making slower, round turns in the bumps I avoid the backs too. It's easier on the body to go around. In that instance I think more of "Scarving", where the skis are travelling in a consistent arc, but with any degree of skidding depending on my needs at the time. A pure carve takes too long to develop (in my mind), so I have to displace the tip/tail by turning the ski a little more, and tipping the ski on edge a little less. I think I mis-spole when I thought I was "Carvy" at the bottom of the turn. In a slower bump turn, it feels skidded throughout, but consistently skidded. (I'm confusing myself!)

Please keep in mind I hardly EVER ski bumps slowly. I haven't really started to pay the price for that yet, and until I do, ROCK ON!
I don't think you mispoke, You said when making slower turns you avoid the back side of the bump. When I attempt to ski slow I slide down the backside of the bump in attempt to gain speed control while trying to maitain 90% weight on the downhill ski and stay on the balls of my feet as opposed to my heels. Now I'm in the trough of the bump, so at "the bottom of the turn" your actually carving up the front side of the bump and beginning weight shift before the crest of the next bump. I consistently skid on the backside and carve on the front side. My goal is to carve throughout the turn but like you said a real carve takes to long to develop.

Farmers almanac calls for snow Oct 28-31 in the northeast.
post #24 of 29

Finishiation!

Aaaaah. I believe I said I may have "mis-spole". (I is a collidge gradjit.)

Anyway. Good point. The question then, I guess, is this. Is the front of the new bump the end of the turn? Or the beginning?

Bump skiing can be highly anticipatory. While the skis are are on the face of the bump, the mind (and the CM, for that matter) can be well into the next turn.

It can also be rather reactive. While the skis are on the face of the bump, the body and mind can still be "living in the now" and responding to feedback.

What then, with regards to bump skiing, constitutes the "end of the turn"? The "beginning"? Is there more than one correct answer?

Food for thought.
Spag

PS. Send some of that snow my way.
post #25 of 29
Thread Starter 
Your right, when carving a turn on groomed terrain, the beginning and the end points are different than I described in a bump turn. This leads me to believe that my description is incorrect but that's how I ski a bump. If you get a chance Spag ( or anyone else)can you walk me through the technique of 1 carved turn on groomed terrain? Where does it start? Where is the weight transition? How much weight transition is there? For example is it 100% on the downhill ski when carving groomed terrain? I love skiing bumps, steeps, trees etc.. I am forgetting the basics when trying to adjust to more difficult terrain.
post #26 of 29
Jsul. I'll do my best. Seems to me you have a pretty good grasp of what you are doing, so if I blow it for you, just ignore my post! Keep in mind that this is MY perception of the turn. Some others may have it different. Some others may have it better.

We can divide the "Carved turn on Intermediate terrain" into 3 sections.

1. Initiation - This is where the Center of Mass (CM) passes over the skis and to the inside of the new turn. The skis begin to tip onto their edges progressively. Rotary input from the legs is minimal. Edging input form the ankles is maximum. Foot to Foot Pressure is fairly even, but will progressively change.

2. Shaping (or "Control") -The skier actively guides skis through the apex of the turn via the use of the ankles, knees and hips. Higher edge angles develop. The ouside leg is fairly long, the inside leg fairly short. The CM is travelling a path INSIDE the path of the skis. Angulation between the upper and lower body achieves its maximum. Foot to Foot Pressure is now uneven, with the lion's share going to the outside. We do need to activate the inside ski, however, to make both skis carve. So 90% outside might be a bit much. I always strive for 50/50, even though in reality it may only be 70/30.

3. Finish - The edge angle, and therefore angulation in the body, DECREASES in preparation for the new turn. The CM moves back over the tops of the skis and we pass through "NEUTRAL" again.

Before you begin your carved turns, you'll need a GOOD SPOT TO MOVE FROM at each initiation. Some refer to it at "neutral". Neutral is where we are when we are skeletally aligned, relaxed, natural. Think of it as how you would stand if you were gliding down a gentle slope on flat skis and not turning. There is a finite place where Neutral happens between the finish and initiation phases of the turn. You don't pause there, you pass THROUGH it. I call that "Finishiation".


OK BUMPS. The phases of the turn remain the same, but there are some major differences that make Carving look like Carving and Bumps look like... well, like they do.

1. Edging isn't as prominent in bumps. It's THERE, but in much smaller increments than when carving. If you try to use the same edging input in the bumps as you do carving, you won't have a million-dollar smile for long.

2. Lengthening and bending the legs becomes a more important means of keeping ski/snow contact. In a carved turn it can be used more passively as pressure builds and recedes.

3. Things happen faster in the bumps and it's even more important to use simultaneous leg movements. Where touch and finesse will get you through a carved turn, finesse and speed are what ya need to negotiate "them dang things". By speed I don't mean speed across the snow, I mean the quickness and precision in which you tip, turn, and flex/extend the legs TOGETHER. I can fudge my way out of a carved turn when I get sequential, it's more difficult to survive mistakes like that in the bumps. (Yes, even when skiing them slowly.)

I'm not sure that helped, but I got to waste a little time. Cheers!

Spag
post #27 of 29

Move toward neutral!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Notorious Spag View Post
Before you begin your carved turns, you'll need a GOOD SPOT TO MOVE FROM at each initiation. Some refer to it at "neutral". Neutral is where we are when we are skeletally aligned, relaxed, natural. Think of it as how you would stand if you were gliding down a gentle slope on flat skis and not turning. There is a finite place where Neutral happens between the finish and initiation phases of the turn. You don't pause there, you pass THROUGH it. I call that "Finishiation".
For bumps, it is difficult to emphasize that GOOD SPOT TO MOVE FROM enough. Skiers frequently find themselves behind and/or uphill of their feet at the point where they should be moving through neutral. This makes the next turn initiation difficult because of the extra muscle required, or late, or both. The bumps feel like they're coming too fast, and the quads give out fairly quickly.

Why does this happen?

Consider Bob Barnes' "backpedaling" animation (http://forums.epicski.com/showthread.php?t=43973). Note that, when coming over the high spot (this can be the top of the bump, but it can also be a bridge or high point between bumps), the feet effectively move back relative to the CM. This can be accomplished in a variety of ways (pull the feet back, close the ankles, move the hips forward, etc.), but in real life, the backpedaling motion is often not complete and the required movement of the CM relative to the feet (or the feet relative to the CM) doesn't happen. The skier absorbs, but still ends up behind his/her feet. This is made worse as the skis accelerate down the backside of the bump. Without some powerful move to get the CM over the feet, the situation deteriorates, regardless of where the skier attempts the next initiation.

Note that the shape of the bump can help the skier move toward neutral, so that skier doesn't have to force the feet back or the CM forward.

Note also that the next initiation can occur almost anywhere, if the skier is moving toward or through neutral. Timing your move toward neutral puts you in control; now you can ski the bumps rather than having the bumps ski you. You can initiate on the front, over the top, on the back, on the bridge, in the gutter, off the side. You can choose how much edge, how much rotary, how much skid you're going to allow or cause. It puts you in a position to control the pressure and reduce "float," which will, in turn, enhance your speed control through the whole turn. Your precision and accuracy improve. Moving through neutral makes everything easier.

Skilled bump skiers can deal with being behind their feet. It's not too difficult to end up behind one's feet when skiing close to the limit. But it takes extra muscle, it makes the run more difficult, and, unless you're deliberately playing with turning on your tails, it's probably less fun. Skilled bump skiers make sure it's a transient condition.

Not that I've actually mastered any of this myself...
post #28 of 29
Here, here! Good post.
post #29 of 29
Thread Starter 
Great stuff guys!! Bob Barnes backpedaling animation is awesome. It's important to visualize your run, I enjoy making carved turns on groomed terrain and visualizing a bump or tree line run. I mention weight disturbution because CM is crucial and often I over rotate hips, throw the hands back or forward, kick the feet out in attempted to force or initiate a turn. Basically I try to do to much. In a bump run, I think patience is extremely important. When coming up the front of the bump you must be patient not to initiate a turn until you reach the top of the bump. At the crest of the bump you should be stacked(good skeletal form), contained (no flying body parts), and good CM w/ feet underneath you. This is where you are NEUTRAL only you must be fully absorbed. At the crest of the bump you weight shift then laterally roll your knee. There is no body weight at the crest of the bump. If you initiate the turn coming up the front side of the bump you must account for your body weight which is like doing a 200lb. leg squat on each turn because you are absorbing.

Sorry if I'm confusing anyone I'm certainly not an instructor, just trying to get a mental picture before it snows.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Ski Instruction & Coaching