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touring or alpine bindings w/Bro's?

post #1 of 16
Thread Starter 
I've pretty much convinced myself that I'm getting some Bro's this season...

My question is whether I should mount alpine bindings (Look/Rossi P12's), or mount AT bindings (of which I know very little about).

My dilemna is that I want to get into AT/ski-mountaineering, but only plan on doing a little bit of lift serviced touring this year...I'm pretty out of shape and want to work into ski-mountaineering slowly (want to build my climbing skills/ski skills and physical shape before getting myself killed).

The majority of my skiing for the upcoming season will be ski area and lift serviced, but I do want to be able use my existing gear once I go all out, which I hope to do the following season.

Is there an AT binding that will work with alpine boots that will provide the same performance as alpine bindings?

How will skiing w/AT bindings and AT boots (Scarpas?) perfrom compared to a regular downhill setup and will it be like re-learning to ski?

Thank's for any insight.
post #2 of 16
Have my shorter 179s set up with Naxo21s AT binder - pretty bomber and works fine in any condition.
post #3 of 16
I am perhaps the minority but I absolutely HATE touring bindings for skiing....whether it's the height or the side-to-side slop or the lack of ramp angle (or all 3), to me they just make the ski feel rediculously loose underfoot...maybe fritchi's fixed a bit of that with their new generation freeride (I forget what it's called)...I've only found them tolerable in pure pow or in really grabby firm snow...

...so unless you're sure you're going to do a decent amount of touring I'd personally steer you toward to alpine bindings and hiking or trekkers...but again, I am perhaps in the minority..

...I think MTT has had kind of the same experience as me...
post #4 of 16
I've pretty much convinced myself that I'm getting some Bro's this season...

My question is whether I should mount alpine bindings (Look/Rossi P12's), or mount AT bindings (of which I know very little about).

How hard are you skiing inbounds? I'd stay away from AT bindings if you're regularily hucking big, otherwise they're fine. Not as solid as an alpine binding, but you won't be giving up that much.

My dilemna is that I want to get into AT/ski-mountaineering, but only plan on doing a little bit of lift serviced touring this year...I'm pretty out of shape and want to work into ski-mountaineering slowly (want to build my climbing skills/ski skills and physical shape before getting myself killed).

Pretty much what AT bindings like the Freeride and Naxo are built for.

The majority of my skiing for the upcoming season will be ski area and lift serviced, but I do want to be able use my existing gear once I go all out, which I hope to do the following season.

The weight weenies will scream Dynafit, but unless you're going for huge vert or long, multi-day tours the Freerides or Naxos do there job well.

Is there an AT binding that will work with alpine boots that will provide the same performance as alpine bindings?

No, but either Freerides or Naxos work with Alpine boots and their performance isn't a huge drop.

How will skiing w/AT bindings and AT boots (Scarpas?) perfrom compared to a regular downhill setup and will it be like re-learning to ski?

Touring gear is typically a little softer and flexier than full alpine gear, ramp angle may feel a little off at first, but it's still making alpine turns with alpine gear.

Thank's for any insight.

With the weight of the Bros, I'd be hard pressed to put anything but an AT binding on them. Pretty sure my next gear purchase is going to be 179 Bros w/ Dynafits.
post #5 of 16
Unless you own multiple pairs of Skis, go Alpine on the Bro's. I skied allot of days this year with Freerides on Soft Bro's. This set-up was ok but for inbounds Alpine binders are better. mount the Bro's with look bindings and have a great winter.

To clairify, Freerides are pretty good on Bros for the downing. I used this settup most of this past winter with my alpine boots. The Ramp angle bugged me but I got used to it. The stack hight of the FreeRides made the skis a bit unstable in certain situations (They dam near stapped my ankles on STEEP HARD STUFF)

If you are a rock star skier and really what that AT set-up Go ahead put AT/ Binding on.

If you are buying your first fat skis? And you really want to rock the mountain on your Bro's Put alpine Binding on them.
post #6 of 16
Quote:
Unless you own multiple pairs of Skis, go Alpine on the Bro's. I skied allot of days this year with Freerides on Soft Bro's. This set-up was ok but for inbounds Alpine binders are better. mount the Bro's with look bindings and have a great winter.
Wouldn't you say "If you own multiple pairs of skis and have something else in the quiver to use for a touring rig, put alpine bindings on the Bros"?

I don't understand why someone who, by the sound of it, wants a pair of skis to transition over to touring would want alpine bindings.

I don't have a ton of experience on Freerides in bounds, likely only 30 days or so riding lifts with them, but for anything short of bulletproof ice they've been okay.
post #7 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by JeffW View Post
they've been okay.
And thats my point, I was in the same boat as this guy last year. I ended up sking my A/T set-up inbounds because my In-Bounds set-up was out for warrenty most of the winter.

I see allot of people who mount A/T bindings on there 1 Ski quiver because they might start doing some touring and they heard that the A/T bindings were close to the same as Alpine.

I say not the same, and the bad part is they are lacking when you need them the most, when your in a tough spot in Really technical terrain thats when the A/T binding are lacking.

Why spend all your time compensating for a binding and just getting by, when you can have real alpine binding doing what they supposded to do better.
post #8 of 16
Quote:
Why spend all your time compensating for a binding and just getting by, when you can have real alpine binding doing what they supposded to do better.
Cause touring on alpine bindings is harder than skiing on touring bindings.

For the record, though, I see your point and am hardly one to argue against adding more skis to the quiver.
post #9 of 16
I will post a picture that explains what I am talking about.
post #10 of 16
Thread Starter 
I do own multiple skis, but I've been told that Bro's make awesome AT ski's, and considering I now lust after a pair and I want to get into AT/Ski-mountaineering I just figured a marriage might be in order.

Thank's to the input thus far I'm gravitating towards alpine binders too really enjoy the ski's, especially considering that they will be used 90% of the time on in-bounds/lift serviced on/off piste conditions.
I don't want to sacrifice, or "make do" just so I can have an AT setup I'm not likely to fully use just yet.

I just figured that if it could be done w/out too much bother/difference than I would.

I'm still open to suggestions/input although, so keep it coming.
post #11 of 16
Really a personal decision, you've got guys like MTT (among others, for sure) that don't like them and a lot of others that use AT bindings exclusively with no complaints.
post #12 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by memosteve View Post
I do own multiple skis, but I've been told that Bro's make awesome AT ski's, and considering I now lust after a pair and I want to get into AT/Ski-mountaineering I just figured a marriage might be in order.

Thank's to the input thus far I'm gravitating towards alpine binders too really enjoy the ski's, especially considering that they will be used 90% of the time on in-bounds/lift serviced on/off piste conditions.
I don't want to sacrifice, or "make do" just so I can have an AT setup I'm not likely to fully use just yet.

I just figured that if it could be done w/out too much bother/difference than I would.

I'm still open to suggestions/input although, so keep it coming.
If you are going to buy skis for an A/T set-up Bro's are the ski to buy.

But as I said above.
post #13 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by MTT View Post
If you are buying your first fat skis? And you really want to rock the mountain on your Bro's Put alpine Binding on them.
...I think that sums it up
post #14 of 16
I just actually read Jeff W's 1st post

he makes some great points...as I said I could be in the minority.

it's just when I read this:
"but only plan on doing a little bit of lift serviced touring this year...I'm pretty out of shape and want to work into ski-mountaineering slowly (want to build my climbing skills/ski skills and physical shape before getting myself killed)."

I was thinking the having the ski perform at it's best on the downhill and sprinkling in some hikes or short climbs using trekkers would be the best approach....he could always remount with an AT binding no problem (2 drills doesn't seem to be as detrimental to the Bros value as it is to other skis)
post #15 of 16

Photo Bucket is back

This picture is a display of what I am talking about.
In this picture I have just landed a 10 ft drop into a STEEP bowl and I am cranking my first turn to bleed off some speed. I am really loading my legs and skis here,

If you look close at my right (Down hill) leg you can see that the ski is tilting away from me too much my leg is actually bending in the ski boot. This is because of the height and flex in the Free Ride binding.

Keep in mind that I was able to drop 10' into a real steep bowl and ski away with Free Rides, Its just not as comfortable as it is on the same ski with Alpine Binding.
Maybe if I was not such a fat bastard I would not have the problem??


Photo by Bio-Smear
post #16 of 16
Blaming whatever your feeling in that picture on the bindings is kinda lame. While a little bit of flex is noticeable with freerides when carving on hard snow or pounding icy moguls, it's not severe enough by any stretch to be the cause of your leg to folding over on you.
Really the only reasons to avoid freerides or naxos is because they make you nervous about hitting 20 or 30 footers to hardpack or if you're worried about the slight drop in performance on groomers (and if this is the case, fat skis w/ any binding aren't the right tool).
If you're focus is soft snow performance and the ability to hit some sidecountry shots, the minor drop in performance on groomers won't even come into play.
If you've got other skis for groomer days and moguls and aren't planning on using them to regularly huck 40' to flat, icy landings , there's no reason at all not too use them.
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EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › Ski Gear Discussion › touring or alpine bindings w/Bro's?