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How would you plan one amazing ski month? - Page 2

post #31 of 48
Most of the Drive is on I 15 You do take a secondary road from Twin Falls ID over to Jackson. The drive time is less then 5 easy hours. You may want to stay a night in Driggs ID and ski Grand Targhee. Driggs is a lot less expensive then Jackson. The Place is well worth a day or two or Three.
Here is your powder day game plan. wake early and check the road reports. UHP says the road up LCC is closed for Avalanche work! No worries grab some coffee and head up Big Cottonwood wait also closed! You still got game I 80 is wide open and Park City is only 45 mins up the road. Now you did not hear this from me but locals know that one of the best Powder day spots in Utah is Deer Valley. Yes the that place with multi million dollar homes can be a powder skiers heaven. Seems that many of the Deer Valley guest just don't like all that nasty snow covering thier groomed runs. They take a spa day and you get the face shots. Now remember you did not hear that here.
post #32 of 48
Thread Starter 
Thanks - wonder what else I might not hear over here. How about sundance? is that really a hidden gem? Am definitely intrigued by Snow Basin and Powder too, and know I could get lost at Canyons.

An easy 5 hour drive to WY would be a snap. I drive 5 hrs to Vermont every weekend. After our 05/06 'lost season' in the east - I'm ready for the big time.
post #33 of 48

Gold Pass, Rocky Mountains, bunk it

Heh! If only we all had a month to burn on Skiing! You say you haven't been to the Colorado Hills. I learned to ski out east, and moved to Colorado 4 years ago. My skiing improved alot!! But it can be expensive to live out here, so a month off work isn't an option for me. (I know, sniff!)

So, back to your trip. As far as a pass goes, if $$ is less of an issue, buy a Gold Pass from Colorado Ski Country. They ARE $2500 or something, but they'll allow you into all the 26 Colorado resorts as many times as you want. I think you can also dig on Silverton Mountain -which is a new CO thing. A friend of mine had one of these and they are apparently transferable, so if you take a day off you can hand it over to your son/daughter/GF/wife.

As far as living situation, there are usually hostel-type living situations where you can share a room with others for like $30 a night. Most of these folks are friendly skiers doing the same thing as you, or local instructors. It's definatly the way to meet your Apres' buddies the first night.

I wouldn't recommend living in your car. It does get friggin cold.

Anyway, if I were in your situation, I'd do Colorado for a month. Hit all the resorts you can and tell us about it when you're done!


Quote:
Originally Posted by Schusseur View Post
Due to a particular job situation, I'll have one full month this winter to live out a lifelong ski dream. Never did the ski-bum thing as a young man - pursued a career instead. Now I'm 40ish and have a one-time opportunity to go back and correct history.

So where should I go and how should i go about it? am totally open as to location (one or many?), living situation (rent a room?, lodge it?, live in car?), hook-up with people or go alone?, etc.

I've been to Alta/Snowbird but am open minded since I really could go anywhere in North America (or Europe?). Haven't yet been to the big Colorado hills.

I want to experience the thrill. I want to do it all.

Then I'll head home and get back to work. So how would you plan one amazing ski month?
post #34 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by Schusseur View Post
Thanks - wonder what else I might not hear over here. How about sundance? is that really a hidden gem? Am definitely intrigued by Snow Basin and Powder too
Utah49 gives sage advice. Pass on Sundance - if you're looking epic face shots.

Powder Mountain isn't the world's gnarliest terrain, but it's got pow till the pigs come home. Cat rides up to James Peak and backside runs down DMI (Don't Mention It) to the bus will burn your quads for days.

Snow Basin doesn't get has much deep as PM, but it's still more than Vail, and what terrain! Great snow, superb fall-line orientation and the best lift system ever. You can hammer vert at SB like no place I've seen.
post #35 of 48
Dear Brother Schuss,

READ POST #29 AGAIN. Then read all the others and re-read what Choucas put up. Go drink a beer, smoke a joint, or have a cup of tea and forget about it for a while. Go back and read it one more time. Did it get you yet? Believe me, a month spent in the Alps is magical beyond comprehension. As I was reading most all the other responses, they all started sounding the same. My mind drifted off to my third trip to the Alps where I spent seven weeks both staying put AND storm-chasing. Bloody wonderful trip and I wondered why nobody had mentioned northern Italy until I got to Choucas` post.

There must be a reason why guys like Micah Black and Paul Parker set up camp in places like Alagna and Valtournenche, respectively. They are amazing ski towns, and better yet, located close to various incredible smaller ski gems unheard of to the myopic masses. I was very fortunate in `01 to stay in Courmayer while the tunnel from France was closed(due to an unfortunate event). It was like going back 20 years. You can`t grasp the richness of these quaint villages which are mostly absent of Mcboxes until you`re there in the flesh. I would also HIGHLY recommend Norway for an unforgettable ski experience. I went there with two Swiss friends and we skied in one main region and stayed in various villages and local huts for fairly cheap. Very friendly and safe, and every bit as stunningly beautiful as Alaska. It got me, and I want to return soon.

Most of the folks speak some English in Europe, and when they don`t, well half the fun is figuring things out. There`s usually at least one spot in the Alps getting regular good snow, and the different areas seem to alternate, so you may have to be flexible. Norway usually has good snow. A well-seasoned ski bummer will tell you the experience is more than just about the skiing. You will meet unforgettable people in either place and have the ski trip of your life, leaving you wanting more experiences like this. Some of the lift systems in the Alps are nothing short of engineering feats.

I know I mentioned my third trip to Europe earlier, but if I hadn`t had an incredible first trip, I wouldn`t have gone back for a second, third, and fourth visit. I live in Alaska and ski mostly backcountry 4-5 days a week every week, all winter, and getting out of state for a multi-week trip is what really tops off the whole season. I wouldn`t really recommend this place unless you don`t mind the darkness(pre-March), have a wad to spend (better places to blow it), and don`t mind skiing one resort. I`ve been to Whistler, Lake Tahoe, Wasatch, Jackson, Cascades, Colorado and they are all beautiful places to ski with great snow, except you have a month for an adventure- defined as where the outcome is neither known or predictable.

I actually envy you Schuss because you have no idea what you`re about to get into. I hope this helps, feel free to send a PM if you want more info. Did it get you? It will if you`re receptive to it.
"I want to experience the thrill. I want to do it all." Your words.

Peace and good luck. Arrivederci, guten tag, ciao!
post #36 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by Utah49 View Post
Most of the Drive is on I 15 You do take a secondary road from Twin Falls ID over to Jackson. The drive time is less then 5 easy hours. .....
Here is your powder day game plan. wake early and check the road reports.
.....
Seems that many of the Deer Valley guest just don't like all that nasty snow covering thier groomed runs.
There is a back way from SLC to Jackson (depart I-15 through Logan and wind your way through from there). Jackson locals say it's a 1/2 hour quicker, but you have to speed through the boonies and speed limit through the town speed traps. It's also got a few "we don't do no stinkin' plowin' after dark" sections. It's definitely a useful option when weather is moving in. The bonus is that you can stop and spend a 1/2 day at Beaver mountain and still make it.

The canyons often slide slightly after sunup. On a freshie day, it's often worth it to be at the top of the canyon by 8am at Alta. There is nothing like being one of 60 people skiing at Alta while the road is closed and Snowbird is under a lodge hold. Of course, your odds of getting caught going up the road are higher too, but hey, that's what adventure is all about, eh?

The Deer Valley powder secret is out. It's still nicer than Alta/Bird competition wise, but the days of easy fresh tracks all day and double depths in the woods are gone (see the powder history thread).
post #37 of 48
Be mindful of which month you pick.
That can make or break your experience.
February and March are great months for much of The Alps

Hem
post #38 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by col_surfer View Post
Dear Brother Schuss,

READ POST #29 AGAIN. Then read all the others and re-read what Choucas put up. Go drink a beer, smoke a joint, or have a cup of tea and forget about it for a while. Go back and read it one more time. Did it get you yet? Believe me, a month spent in the Alps is magical beyond comprehension. As I was reading most all the other responses, they all started sounding the same. My mind drifted off to my third trip to the Alps where I spent seven weeks both staying put AND storm-chasing. Bloody wonderful trip and I wondered why nobody had mentioned northern Italy until I got to Choucas` post.

There must be a reason why guys like Micah Black and Paul Parker set up camp in places like Alagna and Valtournenche, respectively. They are amazing ski towns, and better yet, located close to various incredible smaller ski gems unheard of to the myopic masses. I was very fortunate in `01 to stay in Courmayer while the tunnel from France was closed(due to an unfortunate event). It was like going back 20 years. You can`t grasp the richness of these quaint villages which are mostly absent of Mcboxes until you`re there in the flesh. I would also HIGHLY recommend Norway for an unforgettable ski experience. I went there with two Swiss friends and we skied in one main region and stayed in various villages and local huts for fairly cheap. Very friendly and safe, and every bit as stunningly beautiful as Alaska. It got me, and I want to return soon.

Most of the folks speak some English in Europe, and when they don`t, well half the fun is figuring things out. There`s usually at least one spot in the Alps getting regular good snow, and the different areas seem to alternate, so you may have to be flexible. Norway usually has good snow. A well-seasoned ski bummer will tell you the experience is more than just about the skiing. You will meet unforgettable people in either place and have the ski trip of your life, leaving you wanting more experiences like this. Some of the lift systems in the Alps are nothing short of engineering feats.

I know I mentioned my third trip to Europe earlier, but if I hadn`t had an incredible first trip, I wouldn`t have gone back for a second, third, and fourth visit. I live in Alaska and ski mostly backcountry 4-5 days a week every week, all winter, and getting out of state for a multi-week trip is what really tops off the whole season. I wouldn`t really recommend this place unless you don`t mind the darkness(pre-March), have a wad to spend (better places to blow it), and don`t mind skiing one resort. I`ve been to Whistler, Lake Tahoe, Wasatch, Jackson, Cascades, Colorado and they are all beautiful places to ski with great snow, except you have a month for an adventure- defined as where the outcome is neither known or predictable.

I actually envy you Schuss because you have no idea what you`re about to get into. I hope this helps, feel free to send a PM if you want more info. Did it get you? It will if you`re receptive to it.
"I want to experience the thrill. I want to do it all." Your words.

Peace and good luck. Arrivederci, guten tag, ciao!
Yeah, this post really blows my little map of western North America out of the water....I've never been to the Alps but can't imagine how radical it must be to have an extended stay in a town like Chamonix, St. Anton, Saas Fee, Grindelwald or any of the countless others....whew. :
post #39 of 48
What's stopping you from going?
Forget about imagining and purchase the flight tickets.
there are many wonderful adventures waiting to be had
as you write your life's book.

Hem
post #40 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bez View Post
Yeah, this post really blows my little map of western North America out of the water....I've never been to the Alps but can't imagine how radical it must be to have an extended stay in a town like Chamonix, St. Anton, Saas Fee, Grindelwald or any of the countless others....whew. :
Disclaimer: I've never skied the Alps.

Last January I took a group of business associates from Europe, who had ONLY skied the Alps, on a ski junket to Park City and Deer Valley (would have chosen Solitude or Alta, but they needed nightlife).

One day at Deer Valley we got hammered with 12 inches of fresh. Empire Canyon was a powder playground for most of the day. A gem.

The guys from Europe told me that in all their lives, after skiing many resorts in the Alps (can't tell you which), they had not encountered snow and sun like that.

Even the packed-snow days, in their estimation, exceeded the weather and snow they had experienced in Europe. They said the Utah snow was smoother and softer to ski on, and they expressed surprise at how polite people were.

Perhaps they were just being polite to me, as their host, or perhaps they were being careful not to PO us swaggering, rude Yanks. I can't say, because I've never skied Europe.

But, they seemed to prefer skiing here. They're coming again in January (sometimes I love my job).
post #41 of 48
No doubt the skiing on this part of the North American continent is second to none,: however, for the total ski vacation experience, I can't wait for my own European adventures! I spent one winter in a flat, dreary little northern German farm town where it rained 5 of seven days and the closest I could get to skiing the Alps was watching World Cup skiing on German tv, and yet I still had an awesome time. Europe is like that.
post #42 of 48
bez:
You may want to save the categorizations until after you have skied The Alps.

Captain Strato:
They were likely being sincere:
Utah (like nearly all of the US) is farther south than any of the Alps, and Utah resorts (like all of the Rockies' resorts) are based at higher altitude than most Alpine resorts,
hence drier snow and stronger sun.
These are often peculiarly striking features to European skiers who visit The Rockies.
Most American skiers who ski the Alps remark on how vast the resorts are, how uncontrolled (eg: little patrol activity or safety features) the skiing is, and how centralized skiing is to the ambient culture.

Hem
post #43 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by hemingway View Post
bez:
You may want to save the categorizations until after you have skied The Alps.
What categorizations? It's no secret to even non-skiers that both the European Alps and the mountains in western N. America have world class skiing.
post #44 of 48
This categorization:

[quote=Bez;543732]No doubt the skiing on this part of the North American continent is second to none [quote]

post #45 of 48
Surely we're not splitting hairs over the definition of "second to none", are we?: Last time I checked, Europeans still come to North America for what a lot of them consider the best skiing in the world. Heli, backcountry, lift-serviced....for whatever terrain or reason. Why else would they keep coming back?

BTW, just in case you misinterpreted me, from what I hear, skiing in Europe also qualifies as "second to none", as opposed to, say, skiing in China, Ukraine, or the Sahara desert.
post #46 of 48
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bez View Post
Surely we're not splitting hairs over the definition of "second to none", are we?: Last time I checked, Europeans still come to North America for what a lot of them consider the best skiing in the world. Heli, backcountry, lift-serviced....for whatever terrain or reason. Why else would they keep coming back?

BTW, just in case you misinterpreted me, from what I hear, skiing in Europe also qualifies as "second to none", as opposed to, say, skiing in China, Ukraine, or the Sahara desert.
"Second to none" indicates singularity in award.

The Alps still have more American skier visits than do the Rockies with European visits.
Both regions are stunning, and both have peculiar strengths and weaknesses.
until one has skied both, comparisons/contrasts are premature and speculative, at best.

Hem
post #47 of 48
Hem: What about rudeness? My guests commented that lift-line shoving and hostility was surprisingly absent in the US. Apparently, in Europe, getting to the lift is a test of one's elbows. They also mentioned the prevalence of smoking in Europe, especially in lines.

Neither of these issues would keep me from going to the Alps. I'd LOVE to give it a try. But I understand it's a substantially different experience - hence the charm?
post #48 of 48
Both you guys need to relax and have a seat.

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