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Bootfitting Wizard? Fact? Fiction? Let's Unravel The Age Old Mystery Here! - Page 4

post #91 of 109
Quote:
Originally Posted by RUIDI WIRSCH View Post
My opinion is that shoe soles (for the most part) are not shaped to the anatomy of the foot, and that many soles harmfully distort the antatomy of the foot.
Anyone with wide and/or large feet can attest to this. You should see what 50 plus years of shoes has done to my feet.
Bunions, pushed in last two toes and callouses behind the same two. Pads on the sides of my big toes of deep callous material.
No kidding at all here Ruidi these shoes have caused me much damage.

Should I mention plantar faciitis also, but better insoles seeems to have this in check for a few years now.

It's a painful world out there for some with the shoes that fit so poorly by design or lack of.
post #92 of 109
Dude Walker, that 3 degrees was told to me because I asked. I was in a seminar on boot fitting and I had heard the "some movement is nessasary" one two many times, so I asked "how much". Whether he was making it up or not I don't know. It sounds about right to me though, and he was a bootfitter who had expanded his knowledge by becoming a certified pedorthist.

I know I have a hard time getting my head around the concept that everyone that is skiing needs a custom footbed. For some reason this seems to fly in the face of the natural abilities of the foots mechanisms. Are the forces so much greater in skiing that the foot can no longer cope without full support underneath? Or is it that the foot's natural mechanisms are inhibited to such a degree that this support is a replacement or substitute, if you will, for the foots natural mechanisms?

My mind draws a parallel to a traditional dog sled. One made of ash and rawhide. Umweighted it is pretty rigid and may not sit fully on it's runners. Put a little weight in it and it loads up and spreads out over the snow and moves wherever it needs so that the load is fully supported by the runners. The joints in this sled are pretty rigid, but the rawhide allows enough give in the joints that the sled can move with surface and absorb the shock of the movement over the snow without becoming overly distorted, and moving too much.

This is what I am getting out of my current setup. When I went to supporting my foot from above over the instep, with gentle but firm pressure, I was able to free up the foot to absorb and move naturaly just enough to increase performance, and the long term comfort was there by using a foot bed designed for active use, and not rigid imobilaztion of the foot.

Ruidi, which medical professions were they? Later, RicB.
post #93 of 109
Quote:
Originally Posted by RUIDI WIRSCH View Post
Extensive time with several organizations in the medical industry, My interests are far beyond curent teachings in the industry.
You're going to continue to play it coy, aren't you?

Quote:
Originally Posted by RUIDI WIRSCH View Post
My opinion is that shoe soles (for the most part) are not shaped to the anatomy of the foot, and that many soles harmfully distort the antatomy of the foot.
This reply reinforces my sense that it's shape that's the issue. Tell us about the shoes you wear.
post #94 of 109
Ric B
Can you tell me more about the instep pads please?
David's stuff made so much sense to me based on my dodgy feet and experience with bootfitting and podiatrists...
Unfortunately with my dodgy leg/feet my solutions will be (are??) complex in extreme and I have not been in 1 location long enough to complete the whole process as he wished...
post #95 of 109
Quote:
Originally Posted by disski View Post
Ric B
Can you tell me more about the instep pads please?
David's stuff made so much sense to me based on my dodgy feet and experience with bootfitting and podiatrists...
Unfortunately with my dodgy leg/feet my solutions will be (are??) complex in extreme and I have not been in 1 location long enough to complete the whole process as he wished...
He was a very smart man wasn't he? I'll get very detailed in private if you wish. He was very concerned that what he had come up with through his research and effort would be used by someone ineffectively and/or to make money from. PM me. Later, RicB
post #96 of 109
Thread Starter 

Edited by RUIDI WIRSCH - 1/20/11 at 4:00pm
post #97 of 109
Quote:
Originally Posted by RUIDI WIRSCH View Post
Are the forces so much greater in skiing that the foot can no longer cope without full support underneath? Yes the forces of skiing are insane! Think about it: The ski is a huge lever arm, The leg is a huge lever arm! The foot is a boulder in a perpetual seesaw! The ski levers it one way, the leg levers it another! Levers move boulders! and I am certain the foot was not bread to survive these elements.

As for the instep variable: Hmmm I really like the analogy of the dog slead, but I can promise any aprouch from above (for control) Is a compensation for lack of "Know how" from below, Believe me in bootfitting consistant solutions from "Know How" can seem like a myth!

Hey all! I am travelin for the next 10 days! I hope to sneak on here once in a while...Keep up the analogies! Dog Sleds! I love it!
And I would say from my own experience and others that you would be wrong about that Ruidi. If all you know is from below then it would appear that way I guess. It may be that just the opposite is true. later, RicB.
post #98 of 109
Thread Starter 

Edited by RUIDI WIRSCH - 1/20/11 at 4:00pm
post #99 of 109
Quote:
Originally Posted by RUIDI WIRSCH View Post
Below and sides for power transfer and control in ski my man! I stand my ground and have proven it! Instep hight (jam down) buckle crush, over lacing, Bikers and straps etc... crush the foot in submission from above and you will lock out abilities every time. Althoug you did mention a air blatter tougne I believe ( I have no problem with that) Man those old conformable moldable tounges! remember those? we had to master perfection below to even attempt shootiong those old tounges in the day!
Again my point of view only! I love your research and analogies!
My guess is this is unlike anything you have ever tried or been exsposed to Ruidi. On the other hand I have no desire to try to convince you, other than to say that there is nothing crushing about it. What it does do is allow the foot to work in the normal needed fashion, yet it maintains optimum foot placement in the boot and contact with the bootboard. Maintaining foot placement by pressuring the sides and lower top of the foot (traditional means) is counterproductive to natural foot movement and it still doesn't maintain contact of the foot with the bootboard. The other plusses are increased circulation and sesitivity, both of which contribute to greater balance control. As Tristan Roberts said in his book "balance and Human locomotion", balance is about recognition. The modern sk booti does everything it can to take this recognition away from us. The instep pad along with effective ramp angle and forefoot room gave me my recognition back to a large degree.

All those issues of leaverage, in my humble opinion, are handled very effectively by the boot cuff and lower leg. Are the pressures under the foot really any greater than everyday semi-strenuos activeties create? It sure felt like it to me when my foot was pressure from the sides and lifting on and off my footbed. But not now. Why does it make sense to put so much effort into custom foot beds, then squeeze the foot from the sides, and then still leave room for it to lift away from the footbed?

I'll quote a line from an email I got yesterday, I hope he doesn't mind me quoting him, "I always noticed something when I took off MacPhail's boot and put my own back on. My own boots felt like cheap clothes - tight in the wrong places and loose in the wrong places." That is just how it feels to me. Once you have experienced this setup I think it would be very hard to go back. Things change slowly and I have no desire to force anything on anyone. But then if a person doesn't try something, how will they truly know if it works or not? Later, RicB.

P.S. How about the bottom of the foot and boot, and the cuff and lower leg for power transfer?
post #100 of 109
Quote:
Originally Posted by RicB View Post
My guess is this is unlike anything you have ever tried or been exsposed to Ruidi. On the other hand I have no desire to try to convince you, other than to say that there is nothing crushing about it. What it does do is allow the foot to work in the normal needed fashion, yet it maintains optimum foot placement in the boot and contact with the bootboard. Maintaining foot placement by pressuring the sides and lower top of the foot (traditional means) is counterproductive to natural foot movement and it still doesn't maintain contact of the foot with the bootboard. The other plusses are increased circulation and sesitivity, both of which contribute to greater balance control. As Tristan Roberts said in his book "balance and Human locomotion", balance is about recognition. The modern sk booti does everything it can to take this recognition away from us. The instep pad along with effective ramp angle and forefoot room gave me my recognition back to a large degree.

All those issues of leaverage, in my humble opinion, are handled very effectively by the boot cuff and lower leg. Are the pressures under the foot really any greater than everyday semi-strenuos activeties create? It sure felt like it to me when my foot was pressure from the sides and lifting on and off my footbed. But not now. Why does it make sense to put so much effort into custom foot beds, then squeeze the foot from the sides, and then still leave room for it to lift away from the footbed?

I'll quote a line from an email I got yesterday, I hope he doesn't mind me quoting him, "I always noticed something when I took off MacPhail's boot and put my own back on. My own boots felt like cheap clothes - tight in the wrong places and loose in the wrong places." That is just how it feels to me. Once you have experienced this setup I think it would be very hard to go back. Things change slowly and I have no desire to force anything on anyone. But then if a person doesn't try something, how will they truly know if it works or not? Later, RicB.
Ric, where does one go to learn more about the sort of setup that you have?
post #101 of 109
Quote:
Originally Posted by jstraw View Post
Ric, where does one go to learn more about the sort of setup that you have?
The fellow that developed this got thouroughly frustrated by the industry and gave up the whole business. He no longer has any commecial interest in it or skiing for that matter. A person might try contacting Lou Rosenthal at his shop in Whistler, (don't know the name of the shop), and maybe he could help. The pads require very high quality heat moldable foam that can only be bought in large quantities. PM me. Later, RicB.
post #102 of 109
RicB: "As Tristan Roberts said in his book "balance and Human locomotion", balance is about recognition. The modern ski boot does everything it can to take this recognition away from us."

That's exactly why there is the cult of the Flexon/Krypton. They do not give the kind of support you describe, but they do give you tremendously more feel than conventional boots, which allows for more of that "recognition."

The feel is the deal!
post #103 of 109
Quote:
Originally Posted by mudfoot View Post
RicB: "As Tristan Roberts said in his book "balance and Human locomotion", balance is about recognition. The modern sk boot does everything it can to take this recognition away from us."

That's exactly why there is the cult of the Flexon/Krypton. The feel is the deal!
I could never get my feet into one. Oh well. later, RicB.

Two I mean.
post #104 of 109
Well Well Well.....Welcome to Epic Ruidi

Maybe we can ski again someday....it's only been a little over 30 yrs now !

My S.O. went to Jeff Burgeron here in Breck last season to get fit and discovered she has an unusual curve in here lower leg. He suggested she get a different boot and did one fitting with that new boot and the results were nothing short of magic.

Does everyone need fitting ? Well.....yes....does everyone need the full blown custom deal....Well..NO !

btw Ruidi....Still got your stilts ?
post #105 of 109
Ok, now this is interesting..spill the dope on Ruidi!
post #106 of 109
Quote:
Originally Posted by jstraw View Post
Ok, now this is interesting..spill the dope on Ruidi!
He's somebody famous.
post #107 of 109
But of course.
post #108 of 109
Quote:
Originally Posted by Uncle Louie View Post
He's somebody famous.
To Who?
post #109 of 109
Thread Starter 

Edited by RUIDI WIRSCH - 1/20/11 at 4:00pm
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