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Got new boots. Superfeet?

post #1 of 22
Thread Starter 
Purchased my Salomon x-wave 9.0 (25.5) ski boots today. Last season, but no changes were upcoming, so I decided to save on the green. They fit excellently, nice and snug, no hell or foot movement that i can percieve at all.
The liner is one of Salomon's "higher end" liners, and the footbed is much more supportive than the last boot I had (also Salomon).

Should I consider superfeet liners, even if the bootfit seems to be good without them? Will any places let me try liners in my boots that I own w/out purchasing the liners? (Maybe a 6-pack would help things...)
post #2 of 22
No you should not. Those liners are VERY good. If you want to piss away some money custom Foot beds would be nice. But if the X-Waves feel good leave it alone.
post #3 of 22
As long as you are standing flat on your skis in the boots you probably don't need custom foot beds unless you have some other fit problems, which may not show up until you start skiing them. Hopefully the shop adjusted the built in cuff cants and checked you to make sure you are flat in the boots while standing up and when flexing.
post #4 of 22

behind the boot fitting curtain or ahead of the curve?:


Edited by RUIDI WIRSCH - 1/20/11 at 4:00pm
post #5 of 22
I say go for the custom footbeds. I especially liked the feeling the toe ridge gave me on my old cork ones.

I don't suppose you could transfer footbeds up to a new pair of boots that's not two sizes too small could you?
post #6 of 22

Welcome

Ruidi,

Your first post reads like an ad. Maybe it's that cool blue lettering.

Tell us a little about yourself.

And US, consider yourself lucky. I would suggest custom foot beds from someone qualified ie. an expert!
post #7 of 22

Edited by RUIDI WIRSCH - 1/20/11 at 4:00pm
post #8 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ghost View Post
I say go for the custom footbeds. I especially liked the feeling the toe ridge gave me on my old cork ones.

I don't suppose you could transfer footbeds up to a new pair of boots that's not two sizes too small could you?
Why not ? It's the same foot. They would degrade over some lengh of time but if the nice impression is still there use them in any boot/shoe
post #9 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by mudfoot View Post
As long as you are standing flat on your skis in the boots you probably don't need custom foot beds unless you have some other fit problems, which may not show up until you start skiing them. Hopefully the shop adjusted the built in cuff cants and checked you to make sure you are flat in the boots while standing up and when flexing.
Disagreeing with Mudfoot, and reiterating what Ruidi said. I'd quote Ruidi but that bold blue hurt my eyes.....
Custom orthotics don't just correct problems and are more than mere canting devices. They also stabilize the foot in the boot to quicken the transfer of forces to your ski. For just one of the benefits on a perfect foot, picture your foot going on edge. Before that foot applies any pressure to the boot, it must first collapse the arch. With an orthotic filling that space, it no longer has to collapse before the boot starts to respond.
In answer to Ghost, I still have my original Peterson orthotics from over 20 years ago in a pair of sneakers. Having a good friend who's one of the best boot doctors on the east coast helps, but whenever I get new boots, although not needed( my stance is aligned and feet are normal), I have new orthotics made. My old boots go in the garage as a spare, the spare boots get tossed, and the orthotics from the spare go into a pair of whatever. I have orthotics in just about every hiking boot, trail shoe and sneaker that I own. The orthotic is molded to your foot and cut be cut to the size of your new boots. So if your orthotic is of a decent quality, and you haven't developed any foot or stance problems since they were made, there's no reason not to recycle your old orthotics.
post #10 of 22
Most stock footbeds in top of the line ski boots are worth about a whopping 30 cents. I myself simply use Superfeet straight out of the box and have noticed a good difference, and I'm sure customizing them would only improve them further. IMO good skiing footbeds are a must, and having them fully customized is optimal.
post #11 of 22

Edited by RUIDI WIRSCH - 1/20/11 at 4:00pm
post #12 of 22
I have skied with custom footbeds for over 20 years and consider them an important part of my gear, but I have somewhat weird feet. I also skied for the last 5 years on Salomon X-wave 9s and I agree with MTT. They have a good stock footbed and one of the best moldable liners I have ever been in. Utahskier claims to have an excellent fit with no foot movement, which is what I experienced in those boots. Custom footbeds can make a huge difference in your boots' performance and I am a strong proponent of just about everyone using them, but I would hesitate to tell someone that is experiencing a rare "perfect fit" to start messing with it. He can always buy $100+ footbeds later.

As far as trying Superfeet before buying, if you are going to get new footbeds then your should not mess with anything but custom ones that require heating and molding them to your feet. This is an expensive leap of faith based on trusting your boot fitter.
post #13 of 22
Hey Ruidi, what do you suggest?
post #14 of 22
Thanks. I was thinking since the bottoms of the 20-year-old beds fit into my tiny old Koflachs so well that they might be swimming around in my new Solomons. On the other had I've had so much custom work done on the new boots to finally get them to fit, that any differences between the beds might just ruin all of that. The new boots do have custom beds. The new footbeds were made using heat and having my feet on a bean-bag type cushion that took the shape of my feet to start with and are some sort of plastic. The old cork ones were made using a lot of heat and a vacuum applied via plastic bag while heating and adjusting goopy cork sawdust. Dr. Joe did a good job the first time.

I've found that the plastic ones offer a little less support, but allow more air time before my heels/plantars start tho hurt on hard snow.
post #15 of 22
Thread Starter 
Mudfoot --

Thanks for the input on the same boots that I have! I've read that the boots actually have a "customfit liner" that is supposed to be heat moldable to one's foot. Is this legit? Can standing in your boot on a heating apparatus actually make the foam and synthetic materials adapt to your foot, much like a custom fit? Or is this something to be avoided?
post #16 of 22
Quote:
Originally Posted by utahskier View Post
Mudfoot --

Thanks for the input on the same boots that I have! I've read that the boots actually have a "customfit liner" that is supposed to be heat moldable to one's foot. Is this legit? Can standing in your boot on a heating apparatus actually make the foam and synthetic materials adapt to your foot, much like a custom fit? Or is this something to be avoided?
Utahskier,

Take your new boots and go see the guys at Cole Sport in Park City or Boot Works, they have by far and away the best tools for boot customization and have been instructed in state of the art boot fitting and alignment for today’s technique and more importantly today’s skis.

You bought a great boot, spend just a little extra time to get them set up correctly.

Coup
post #17 of 22
It sounds like you have the kind of foot and stance that may not require much attention. Let the seller fit them as best he can and then ski 'em a week before you consider tweaking them.
post #18 of 22
If you decide to get custom footbeds (not liners), you should get them fitted at the same place that fitted you boots; you don't need one fitter blaming the other. Keep all the responsibility for making them fit in one place, hopefully the place that gave you a fit guaranty (free fitting sessions until the boot fits or your money back).
post #19 of 22
Utahskier: My X-Waves are a few years old but I believe they only came with one liner, which needed to be heated with hot air before you tightly put the boot on for about 20 minutes to mold it to your foot. It resulted in the best and most comfortable fit I have ever had (and I've had a few). I was very impressed with the Salomon liner and how it continued to fit well for several years, but I do not believe that the removable footbed in the liner was moldable, although maybe the newer ones like you have are. I substituted my custom beds from my former boots when I went through the fitting process, but the stock X-Wave ones seemed pretty nice.

I agree with coupdevill, you've got a good boot so spend a little more with a good boot fitter to insure that you have the best fit possible. I am always amazed how a slight adjustment to my boots can make a huge difference in how they function. Proper alignment and foot stability is critical, so see a pro fitter, but my original point was that you do not necessaily need custom footbeds to achieve it.
post #20 of 22

Edited by RUIDI WIRSCH - 1/20/11 at 4:00pm
post #21 of 22
I got a pair of the x-waves myself, and love them just the way they are. I ski about 30-40 days in them last year, and it felt very comfortable all day long. i ski hard and put my equipment thru a hell of a work out All i can suggetst is to do what you feel is right. good luck and happy skiing.
post #22 of 22
Ruidi:

Having gone through the boot fitting process many times I agree with a lot of what you have said, but your bottom line appears to be that even in $600 top or the line boots the stock liners "are designed for sneakers" and therefore are useless, and if you get custom made liners there is a huge chance that they will not be right and may cause new problems. So even if you feel your new boots fit and ski perfectly you should take a high risk $120 gamble on some custom footbeds?
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