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Knowledgable opinions needed

post #1 of 17
Thread Starter 
I've been out of skiing for about 10 years. I'm looking at getting back to it, and am shopping for equipment. I have a few questions, but first a description of myself: male, 290lbs, intermediate skiier, ski mostly in icy northeast Pennsylvania. My questions:

1. I see a pair of K2 Axis Mod 188 skis with Marker M9.2 bindings for sale for $125. Is this a good deal? And, Is this a good ski for me?

2. Though I weigh 290lbs, I have more of a muscular build than I do a belly. But, the skis won't know that. Are there particular skis for particular weights, or is it that the more you weigh the longer of ski you should use?

Anything any of you can offer me in advice would be greatly appreciated! Thanks!!!
post #2 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by icynepa
I've been out of skiing for about 10 years. I'm looking at getting back to it, and am shopping for equipment. I have a few questions, but first a description of myself: male, 290lbs, intermediate skiier, ski mostly in icy northeast Pennsylvania. My questions:

1. I see a pair of K2 Axis Mod 188 skis with Marker M9.2 bindings for sale for $125. Is this a good deal? And, Is this a good ski for me?

2. Though I weigh 290lbs, I have more of a muscular build than I do a belly. But, the skis won't know that. Are there particular skis for particular weights, or is it that the more you weigh the longer of ski you should use?

Anything any of you can offer me in advice would be greatly appreciated! Thanks!!!
Hi Icy and welcome to Epic,

I was 250 two years ago. I would look at Volkls 5 Star in a 182cm (plus or minus a few cm) size. Volkl and Atomic tend to be very robust skis. I don't think you will like the K2 on ice.

Michael
post #3 of 17
I think barrettscv advise is pretty solid. The Five Star is a stiff ski with a lot of shape that can move you towards carving. It has a narrow 68 mm waiste, so its not going to support the big guy on soft conditions. In the Volkl line, I'd rather see you in a AC3 Unlimited, or AC4 Unlimited. Its wider,stronger and more versitile for you incase it should snow. If you want to check out a wider ski that will still rail ice, the expensive option is the Stockli Stormrider XL with a 75 mm waist or AT with a 73 mm waist (Check out THIS deal). That is practically a custom ski and would be very fast and stable. The Head Monster with an 82 mm waist is a strong stiff contender, less sidecut than some other options, but will definitely stand up to speed and weight. The K2 ski you're looking at has been out of production for quite a while. A really nice ski in its time (which is past).... and Marker 9.2 bindings? Might be OK, might be bad. Here is the EpicSki review by BanditMan from 2002 CLICK LINK. I would look for a lower price (<$100) on this used, discontinued ski with Marker Bindings.

You really need to focus on getting the right boot too. Avoid anything targeted at intermediates with a big cushy inner boot. That will just pack out and turn to mush for a bigger guy. Find one that fits, but is not overly large. Read the gear FAQ about shell fitting boots so you understand the basics on fit. You are definitely looking for a boot with a flex over 100 and up to 130 to support your weight and strength.
post #4 of 17
Welcome back ti skiing. I own a pair of the old K2 mod x skis IMHO They are stil some of the best bump skis out there. I like my old trusty Mod X skis a lot. K2 skis were never known for thier edge hold on hard snow. f I were skiing in PA I would be looking at something else.
Like Crquerider said look into gettng good boots first then start loking at skis. We have lots of members here who live in PA they could direct you to good bot fitters in your area.
post #5 of 17
Spend time and money on a great boot fitter and good boots.

Then, come winter, spend a day or two demoing scads of skis. When you find the ski you just LOVE and gotta have, start shopping for a deal. Renting for a few days til you new skis show up won't be such a bad thing (most areas at least have reasonable rentals), and you know you'll be getting a ski that makes you happy.

This is way better than just buying based on 'a good deal', cuz skiing has changed A LOT since you left and you don't want to spend $$ on skis that you don't like, or will hold you back.

Trust me on this!
post #6 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cirquerider
The Five Star is a stiff ski with a lot of shape that can move you towards carving. It has a narrow 68 mm waiste, so its not going to support the big guy on soft conditions. In the Volkl line, I'd rather see you in a AC3 Unlimited, or AC4 Unlimited. Its wider,stronger and more versitile for you incase it should snow.
"soft" snow conditions in the NE PA Poconos are so rock hard that most people would use crampons to walk across it. "bad" conditions are akin to skiing on freezer-burn. On those rare occassions where it actually snows it gets groomed out of existence before you'd have a chance to ski it anyway. Using a Volkl "unlimited" ski for PA ski conditions is like using a Hummer to pick up the groceries. Lots of people do it, but it's not really the ideal tool for the job.

Edit: agree 100% with finding the best boot fitter around and getting that taken care of. Good fitting boots that are appropriate for your skill level make everything sooooo much easier.
post #7 of 17
I'm not sure what part of the country (assuming USA) you live. However, Epic Ski has an index of Master Bootfitters. Find the most highly recommended bootfitter in your area. Go in early before the snow starts to fly and the bootfitter is not yet swamped. Since feet tend to spread over the course of the day, it's better to arrange an afternoon excursion to the ski shop.

Although you may be an intermediate skier presently, you are also a big guy so be careful not to get a boot that you will overwhelm. A good bootfitter can steer you in the proper direction in terms of suitable boot models. Since few people have feet that conform well to a ski boot right out of the box, a good bootfitter can make all the difference between skiing being a pleasant vs. a painful experience for your feet. After you get your boots and they are properly dialed in, you can look at skis.

BTW, Welcome to Epic ski.
post #8 of 17

Equipment - Out of Skiing for 10 yrs

DITTO Volklgirl Demo Demo for a few days and then buy. Ditto get some good boots, fit right first then ski's. Ski's have changed so much in 10 years you will be amazed. I don't think anyone can accurately tell you what ski you will like tooooo many variables. DEMO then buy. The more ski's you demo the better choice you will make and will save money in the long run. Good luck have a great winter - welcome back.
post #9 of 17
I would shy away from the Axis Mod. The Axis Mod has a wider shovel than the Axis X and is softer. They would be too soft for your size. They also would be a bad choice as an everyday ski for where you ski since they perform poorly on ice.
post #10 of 17
Another great deal on new Fischer RX8 and bindings HERE

OK KevinF, enough grip?
post #11 of 17
Growing up skiing the Poconos, I feel your pain. Finding demos in your length will be tough though. I recall there used to be a big demo day the weekend befoe Christmas at Jack Frost, I am not sure if that still happens. A local shop by me has some longer NEW K2's still available, PM me for the info.
post #12 of 17
Thread Starter 
All great advice I will follow. I can't thank you enough! I will be able to harbor a little of my anticipation for this upcoming season by shopping for new gear, but then what? This waiting stuff hurts! See ya'll again soon.
post #13 of 17
Pete is so right here. First get yourself some boots and do all the research here and on the net for as much as a informed decision as you can make. Boots are everything and skis mean little in comparison.

Then , Check out the skis. You are a big guy so you need big skis. Some of the midfats will suit you as a more narrow carver to a smaller person.

Then look at the skis around 90 in the middle for a next size for float starting point. I think looking at the Atomic Metron B-5 in one of the longer lenghths might be one for a starter . Also the Volkl AC-4 would be a good choice in the longer lenghth for a big guy that can bend a ski well.

Good luck and check back for more input as you get closer to a decision .

Welcome to Epicski and back on the slopes where you belong
post #14 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by GarryZ
Pete is so right here. First get yourself some boots and do all the research here and on the net for as much as a informed decision as you can make. Boots are everything and skis mean little in comparison.

Then , Check out the skis. You are a big guy so you need big skis. Some of the midfats will suit you as a more narrow carver to a smaller person.

Then look at the skis around 90 in the middle for a next size for float starting point. I think looking at the Atomic Metron B-5 in one of the longer lenghths might be one for a starter . Also the Volkl AC-4 would be a good choice in the longer lenghth for a big guy that can bend a ski well.

Good luck and check back for more input as you get closer to a decision .

Welcome to Epicski and back on the slopes where you belong

I have Volkl AC4 177cm and took them down a Super G Race Course with
no stability worries but on hard snow I found a lesson was necessary to get comfortable in GS turns. Fine in soft crud and Slalom turns. Good on ice and yes felt them bend on part of the Super G course.
post #15 of 17
I still don't think a AC3 would be a bad choice. IIRC, Buckmans had soem great prices on them, also Skibum in Chadds Ford too.
post #16 of 17
Quote:
Originally Posted by Phil Pugliese
I still don't think a AC3 would be a bad choice. IIRC, Buckmans had soem great prices on them, also Skibum in Chadds Ford too.
Phil has a good point. He is an intermediate and the Ac-3 is a good ski and less effort to steer. No real loss of quality or strenghth to carry the skier.
post #17 of 17
Spend your budget on good boots and then lessons with an instructor recommended in the instruction forum.

The smart move, in my opinion, would be to figure out how to get the most out of the new skis through instruction on a demo carving ski. Towards the end of the season you will have a much better idea what to look for.

I'd recommend something with a 65-70mm waist and a ~15m radius. Try starting at around ~170cm, moving up when the ski no longer feels stable. This will make it easiest to get the most out of the skis and have them perform well at speeds you are comfortable with while you are getting back into it. There are any number of good skis in this category such as (but by no means limited too) HEAD XRC 800, Volkl 5 Star, Fischer RX6, Atomic SX-9. It's the dimensions you are looking for, not the brand.

I don't think you should be concerned at all about float. If you happen to find yourself skiing in over 12" of powder, go rent a fat powder ski.
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